Any Dream Will Do

Television presenter Denise Van Outen, and Any Dream Will Do winner Lee Mead are engaged to marry, according to reports in The Mirror newspaper.

Lee, 27, proposed to 34-year-old Denise at home, before taking her on holiday to St Lucia to celebrate the engagement. Denise was very emotional when Lee popped the question in their new home in Kent, and she and her fiance are said to be very excited about getting married.

The pair have been together for the past 18 months after they met in 2007 on the set of talent show, Any Dream Will Do, where Denise was on the judging panel with John Barrowman and Andrew Lloyd-Webber. Lee went on to win the starring role in the hit West End musical, Joseph And His Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat.

No date has been confirmed for the wedding yet, but a spokesperson has confirmed the engagement, and said: “…it will probably be later this year.”

In 1996, Denise dated Dodgy guitarist, Andy Miller. Two years later, she dated Jamiroquai lead singer Jay Kay. They were reported to be engaged for a while, but they split up in 2001 due to his cocaine addiction.

Denise co-presented the breakfast show on Capital Radio with Johnny Vaughan, but she quit last summer due to her television commitments, which included ITV Saturday night entertainment show, Who Dares Sings.

After winning the role in 2007, Lee Mead was to play Joseph for only six months, but his contract was extended until January 2009. X Factor runner-up Gareth Gates will take over the position from February.

The public decided live on BBC One’s Any Dream Will Do tonight that Ben Ellis will not be Joseph.

With the final just one week away, tonight was Andrew Lloyd Webber’s last chance to step in and save the hopeful he thinks could still be Joseph.

The four remaining contenders had to battle it out to prove to the British public that they really do have the power, range and charisma to land one of the best loved and most coveted roles in the West End.

In addition to their solos the boys performed duets from musicals written by Andrew Lloyd Webber himself.

Ben Ellis and Keith Jack performed Starlight Express/Only You from Starlight Express, while Lee Mead and Lewis Bradley performed Oh What A Circus/High Flying Adored from Evita.

After performing their songs and receiving full and frank feedback from Andrew Lloyd Webber and the expert panel of Denise Van Outen, John Barrowman, Bill Kenwright and Zoe Tyler, the Josephs faced the agony of the public vote.

When asked by host Graham Norton who was not Joseph, Zoe Tyler and Bill Kenwright said Ben Ellis, while Denise Van Outen and John Barrowman said Lewis Bradley.

Lewis Bradley and Ben Ellis gained the least public votes, and had to sing a joint rendition of I Dreamed A Dream from the musical Les Miserables.

This week was Andrew Lloyd Webber’s last chance to have his say and choose which Joseph should be saved.

He said: “It’s a really, really difficult decision. Lewis.”

Ben Ellis said after his eviction: “I’m obviously disappointed that I didn’t quite make it to the final, but I kept fighting.

“All the lads still in there are amazing and I wish them the best of luck.”

Before leaving the stage Ben Ellis joined the other Josephs for the now traditional rendition of Poor Poor Joseph/Close Every Door from Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, before taking his final bow.

This week’s group song was the Queen classic Under Pressure.

The three remaining hopefuls go on to next week’s final when they will audition for the public and the public alone to decide who will be Joseph in the new West End production of Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

The public decided live on BBC One tonight in Any Dream Will Do that Daniel Boys will not be Joseph.

After some excellent performances last week, the six remaining Josephs had to prove to the British public that it wasn’t a one-off and they really do have the power, range and charisma to land one of the best loved and most prized roles in the West End.

Once they had performed their songs and received feedback from Andrew Lloyd Webber and the expert panel of Denise Van Outen, John Barrowman, Bill Kenwright and Zoe Tyler, the Josephs faced the agony of the public vote.

When asked by host Graham Norton who was not Joseph, Zoe Tyler and John Barrowman said Lewis, Bill Kenwright said Keith and Denise Van Outen said Craig.

Daniel Boys and Lewis Bradley gained the least public votes and had to perform a joint rendition of Bring Him Home from the musical Les Miserables.

Then it was up to Andrew Lloyd Webber alone to choose which Joseph should be saved.

He said: “I really don’t want to be in my shoes, but tonight I’m going to save Lewis.”

Daniel said after his eviction: “This has been the most amazing experience of my life, I still can’t believe I’ve sung in front of Andrew Lloyd Webber and six million people.”

Before leaving the stage Daniel joined the other Josephs for the now traditional rendition of Poor Poor Joseph/ Close Every Door from Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

This week’s group song was She Loves You by The Beatles, while trios performed That’s Life by Frank Sinatra and Don’t Rain On My Parade from the musical Funny Girl, both of which received rave reviews from the panel.

The five remaining hopefuls go on to next week’s show where they will again audition for the nation to decide who could be Joseph in the new West End production of Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

The public decided live on BBC One tonight that Rob McVeigh will not be Joseph.

After some harsh comments from the judges in last week’s Any Dream Will Do, the seven remaining Josephs had to fight back to prove to the public that they have the power, range and charisma to land one of the best loved and most prized roles in the West End.

Once they had performed their songs and received feedback from Andrew Lloyd Webber and the expert panel of Denise Van Outen, John Barrowman, Bill Kenwright and Zoe Tyler, the Josephs faced the agony of the public vote.

When asked by host Graham Norton who was not Joseph, Zoe Tyler said Daniel Boys, while Bill Kenwright, Denise Van Outen and John Barrowman all said Rob McVeigh.

Rob McVeigh and Lewis Bradley gained the least public votes and had to perform a joint rendition of Tell Me It’s Not True from the musical Blood Brothers.

Then it was up to Andrew Lloyd Webber alone to choose which Joseph should be saved. He said: “I’m going to save Lewis.” He said to Rob: “We’ll all follow your career with huge interest.”

Rob McVeigh said after his eviction: “To be honest I’m shocked I got this far, I know I’ve got a long way to go but I’m going out with my head held high, its been amazing.”

Before leaving the stage Rob McVeigh joined the other Josephs for the now traditional rendition of Poor Poor Joseph/Close Every Door from Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, before taking his final bow.

This week’s group song was You Really Got Me by The Kinks.

The six remaining hopefuls go on to next week’s show where they will again audition for the nation to decide who could be Joseph in the new West End production of Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, at the later time of 8.10pm.

The public have decided that neither Antony Hansen nor Seamus Cullen will be Joseph in tonight’s special double eviction on Any Dream Will Do.

The ten remaining finalists this week performed iconic pop songs in a bid to show viewers that they have the range, power and charisma needed to win one of the most prestigious and sought after roles in the West End.

After performing their songs and receiving full and frank feedback from Andrew Lloyd Webber and the expert panel of Denise Van Outen, John Barrowman, Bill Kenwright and Zoe Tyler, the Josephs faced the agony of not one, but two public votes.

At end of the first live show, when asked by host Graham Norton who was their Joseph, Zoe Tyler said Keith Jack, Bill Kenwright said Lee Mead and Denise Van Outen and John Barrowman both said Daniel Boys.

Antony Hansen and Craig Chalmers gained the least public votes, and had to sing a joint rendition of Everything I Do (I Do It For You) by Bryan Adams.

Then it was up to Andrew Lloyd Webber alone to choose which Joseph should be saved. He said: “This is so difficult, I was looking at my panel because they were both great performances, but I think tonight, just on balance, I’m going save … Craig.”

Antony Hansen said after his eviction: “I knew tonight that I wasn’t on form – and that the other guys were. I’m a better performer for just being in this competition, though, and I’d urge everyone who has a dream to perform to go out on a limb and have a go.”

In the evening’s second live show, Ben Ellis and Seamus Cullen won the fewest public votes and had to perform the pop classic He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother by The Hollies.

Once again it was up to Andrew Lloyd Webber to decide who should be saved. He said: “The plot thickens – what an extraordinary sing-off, I asked for emotion and I got it. But tonight, and at the end of the day, I’m going to save … Ben.”

Seamus Cullen said after his eviction: “I am shocked – I thought I did enough on the individual and group songs but Ben put in a fantastic performance – the performance of his life, so hats off to him.”

Before leaving the stage both Antony Hansen and Seamus Cullen joined the other Josephs for the now traditional rendition of Poor Poor Joseph/Close Every Door from Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, before taking their final bow.

This week’s group song was One Vision from the Queen musical, We Will Rock You.

The eight remaining hopefuls go on to next week’s show where they will again audition for the nation to decide who could be Joseph in the new West End production of Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

Chris Crosby was the first Joseph to be voted out by viewers in tonight’s Any Dream Will Do hosted by Graham Norton.

Tonight, the 12 Joseph finalists auditioned live for the nation for the first time with an array of songs chosen to show the viewers that they can tackle a tune and give it their all whether it be pop, rock or musical theatre.

After performing their songs and receiving feedback from Andrew Lloyd Webber and the expert panel of Denise Van Outen, John Barrowman, Bill Kenwright and Zoe Tyler, the Josephs waited for the viewers to cast their votes.

The two with the lowest votes were Chris Crosby and Ben Ellis, who had to sing for survival with a joint rendition of Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel.

Then it was up to the Lord of the Theatre alone to choose which Joseph should be saved for another week.

Andrew Lloyd Webber said: “It’s a horrible situation as the standard is so high this year, but I’m going to save Ben.”

Ben Ellis will sing again next week, while Chris Crosby was left to say goodbye. Before leaving the stage he joined the other Josephs in a rendition of Close Every Door To Me from Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, before taking his final bow.

Chris Crosby said after the show: “It’s been an amazing experience – I couldn’t have asked for a better opportunity to work with such talented people. I can’t express how much I’ve learnt.”

Safe for another week were Keith Jack, Rob McVeigh, Daniel Boys, Seamus Cullen, Johndeep More, Antony Hansen, Chris Barton, Lewis Bradley, Lee Mead, Craig Chalmers and Ben Ellis.

The remaining hopefuls will go on to next week’s show where they will again audition for the nation to decide who could be Joseph in the new West End version of Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

Any Dream Will Do – from Saturday 31 March, 7.45pm on BBC One

Category: TV Entertainment; BBC One

Last year, the BBC One audience and Andrew Lloyd Webber solved a problem like Maria and catapulted telesales girl Connie Fisher to stardom in The Sound Of Music.

This year, the BBC is shining the spotlight on the world of musical theatre again with a nationwide talent search for a new West End star. This time, it’s the boys’ turn to prove they have the charisma and star quality to make it in the lead role of Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor™ Dreamcoat.

Joining musical composer and producer Andrew Lloyd Webber and presenter Graham Norton is the Any Dream Will Do panel, whose job it is to help viewers choose their Joseph.

Broadway and West End leading lady Denise Van Outen, Torchwood star John Barrowman, acclaimed theatre producer Bill Kenwright and outspoken and opinionated voice coach Zoe Tyler bring their expertise in theatre, music, acting and singing to offer advice to the wannabe Josephs.

The story so far…

Thousands of hopefuls have auditioned up and down the country and the judges now have the arduous task of whittling down the best in a series of call backs, followed by Joseph School and a final live performance to find a new Joseph.

Andrew Lloyd Webber is looking for a completely raw talent that he can turn into a superstar. “There have been some great Josephs,” says Andrew, “but, unlike Maria, there hasn’t been an ‘iconic’ Joseph.

“The audience have their favourites but I’m looking for someone with star quality, real charisma, to hold that show in what is a really complex character.”

Andrew continues: “There hasn’t been a male rock superstar cast in a role for some time and that’s what I’m looking for – somebody like Justin Timberlake.”

And just a few months ago, at the regional interviews, they didn’t disappoint when thousands of talented boys auditioned in Cardiff, Glasgow, Belfast, Manchester and London.

Doctors, builders, students, fathers, civil servants and farmers were among those who turned up and, together with those with some singing experience, made for one of the most diverse mix of people ever considered for a role like this.

“The contest will be very, very open,” says Andrew. “I want as diverse a mix on stage as possible. Because so many people have sung Joseph at school, everybody will have an opinion on who they think makes a great Joseph, which makes the competition, very, very exciting.”

At the auditions, the boys were asked to perform two contrasting songs in front of a leading casting agent, to show off their vocal range, but not everybody had what it takes to get to the next stage…

The London call backs

Only 100 boys make it to the London call backs and, this time, the Joseph wannabes have to prove their worth in front of Any Dream Will Do’s panel of judges. John, Denise, Bill and Zoe tested the boys on both their musical theatre and pop ability before whittling the numbers down to just 50.

This proved a massive test for both types of singers. Vocal coach Zoe is charged with the task of turning boyband boys into theatre singers and stretching the range of the musical theatre lads to include pop in just a short time at Joseph School.

The question the panel have to ask themselves about each boy is: can it be done in time? Have the panel seen anybody with star quality yet? And did nerves get the better of them?

“You can’t afford to be nervous when you’re getting on stage in the West End,” says Denise, star of Chicago on Broadway and in the West End. She also played the leading lady in Tell Me On A Sunday, so should know a thing or two about the process.

“People have no idea about what it takes to audition and perform on stage,” she says. “It’s really tough and shows like Maria and Any Dream Will Do reveal the hard work that goes on behind the scenes.”

Joseph School

The final 50 boys enter Joseph School, where a team of the best coaches in the business teach them vocals, acting and choreography.

With every boy getting the very best in training, there’s some unexpected blossoming of talent, but viewers also see those who can’t hack the pace and, as the drama unfolds, more dreams are made and broken.

The intense Joseph School workshops also include celebrity mentors such as Jason Donovan popping in to lend their support and advice on what it takes to make it as a Joseph. In addition, the panel give the boys nightly progress reports and dreaded overnight homework tasks.

Andrew Lloyd Webber is also on hand to drop a few bombshells as he realises that turning a completely untrained voice into one that can handle eight shows a week is again going to be harder than he thought. Has he cast his net too wide? Can a builder really be the next Joseph?

“The character of Joseph is very difficult to cast,” says Andrew. “He has to be nauseatingly gorgeous so you understand why the brothers throw him in the pit and we have to be convinced of the journey he goes on and the value of forgiveness. It’s a tough call.”

The live performance

The final test is one that will stretch the boys to their limit as Andrew invites them to his castle in Ireland to perform for his friends, family and local people.

The auditions, London call backs, Joseph School and live performance will play out on the first two shows of Any Dream Will Do.

Only 12 boys will come through the audition process still clinging to their hopes of wearing the Dreamcoat. Then it is up to the BBC One audience, over eight live shows, to decide which young boy will become a superstar and take to the stage – fulfilling their wildest dreams and changing their lives for ever.

Last year, the BBC One audience and Andrew Lloyd Webber solved a problem like Maria and catapulted telesales girl Connie Fisher to stardom in The Sound Of Music.

This year, the BBC is shining the spotlight on the world of musical theatre again with a nationwide talent search for a new West End star. This time, it’s the boys’ turn to prove they have the charisma and star quality to make it in the lead role of Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor™ Dreamcoat.

Joining musical composer and producer Andrew Lloyd Webber and presenter Graham Norton is the Any Dream Will Do panel, whose job it is to help viewers choose their Joseph.

Broadway and West End leading lady Denise Van Outen, Torchwood star John Barrowman, acclaimed theatre producer Bill Kenwright and outspoken and opinionated voice coach Zoe Tyler bring their expertise in theatre, music, acting and singing to offer advice to the wannabe Josephs.

The story so far…

Thousands of hopefuls have auditioned up and down the country and the judges now have the arduous task of whittling down the best in a series of call backs, followed by Joseph School and a final live performance to find a new Joseph.

Andrew Lloyd Webber is looking for a completely raw talent that he can turn into a superstar. “There have been some great Josephs,” says Andrew, “but, unlike Maria, there hasn’t been an ‘iconic’ Joseph.

“The audience have their favourites but I’m looking for someone with star quality, real charisma, to hold that show in what is a really complex character.”

Andrew continues: “There hasn’t been a male rock superstar cast in a role for some time and that’s what I’m looking for ” somebody like Justin Timberlake.”

And just a few months ago, at the regional interviews, they didn’t disappoint when thousands of talented boys auditioned in Cardiff, Glasgow, Belfast, Manchester and London.

Doctors, builders, students, fathers, civil servants and farmers were among those who turned up and, together with those with some singing experience, made for one of the most diverse mix of people ever considered for a role like this.

“The contest will be very, very open,” says Andrew. “I want as diverse a mix on stage as possible. Because so many people have sung Joseph at school, everybody will have an opinion on who they think makes a great Joseph, which makes the competition, very, very exciting.”

At the auditions, the boys were asked to perform two contrasting songs in front of a leading casting agent, to show off their vocal range, but not everybody had what it takes to get to the next stage…

The London call backs

Only 100 boys make it to the London call backs and, this time, the Joseph wannabes have to prove their worth in front of Any Dream Will Do’s panel of judges. John, Denise, Bill and Zoe tested the boys on both their musical theatre and pop ability before whittling the numbers down to just 50.

This proved a massive test for both types of singers. Vocal coach Zoe is charged with the task of turning boyband boys into theatre singers and stretching the range of the musical theatre lads to include pop in just a short time at Joseph School.

The question the panel have to ask themselves about each boy is: can it be done in time? Have the panel seen anybody with star quality yet? And did nerves get the better of them?

“You can’t afford to be nervous when you’re getting on stage in the West End,” says Denise, star of Chicago on Broadway and in the West End. She also played the leading lady in Tell Me On A Sunday, so should know a thing or two about the process.

“People have no idea about what it takes to audition and perform on stage,” she says. “It’s really tough and shows like Maria and Any Dream Will Do reveal the hard work that goes on behind the scenes.”

Joseph School

The final 50 boys enter Joseph School, where a team of the best coaches in the business teach them vocals, acting and choreography.

With every boy getting the very best in training, there’s some unexpected blossoming of talent, but viewers also see those who can’t hack the pace and, as the drama unfolds, more dreams are made and broken.

The intense Joseph School workshops also include celebrity mentors such as Jason Donovan popping in to lend their support and advice on what it takes to make it as a Joseph. In addition, the panel give the boys nightly progress reports and dreaded overnight homework tasks.

Andrew Lloyd Webber is also on hand to drop a few bombshells as he realises that turning a completely untrained voice into one that can handle eight shows a week is again going to be harder than he thought. Has he cast his net too wide? Can a builder really be the next Joseph?

“The character of Joseph is very difficult to cast,” says Andrew. “He has to be nauseatingly gorgeous so you understand why the brothers throw him in the pit and we have to be convinced of the journey he goes on and the value of forgiveness. It’s a tough call.”

The live performance

The final test is one that will stretch the boys to their limit as Andrew invites them to his castle in Ireland to perform for his friends, family and local people.

The auditions, London call backs, Joseph School and live performance will play out on the first two shows of Any Dream Will Do.

Only 12 boys will come through the audition process still clinging to their hopes of wearing the Dreamcoat. Then it is up to the BBC One audience, over eight live shows, to decide which young boy will become a superstar and take to the stage – fulfilling their wildest dreams and changing their lives for ever.

BBC’s newest reality show Any Dream Will Do will be open for auditions in the next week, all over the UK. Click below for the places and times…

Read more.

Following the success of How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria?, Peter Fincham, BBC One Controller, today announced Any Dream Will Do which will search for the leading cast members in Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s Joseph And His Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat.

The search for Joseph will begin with auditions in key UK cities early next year and the show will broadcast in the Summer.

Any Dream Will Do will unite host Graham Norton and music impresario Andrew Lloyd Webber who, along with a panel of experts, will chose a male lead who will be performing in the West End next year.

The winner of How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria?, Connie Fisher, has wowed West End audiences since her debut in The Sound Of Music in November and interest from the public has meant an extended run of six months.

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