CSI Las Vegas

csi: crime scene investigation
living doll (24/24)
21.00–22.00

The successful Las Vegas-based forensics drama concludes its seventh series this week. In tonight’s nerve-wracking finale, the identity of the replica killer is finally revealed, but not before a member of the CSI team is placed in grave danger; and Grissom and Sara’s relationship comes to light.

After a season of twists and turns, the CSIs think they have a new lead on the serial killer that has struck four times, leaving a replica of the crime at each location. A man named Ernie Dell originally confessed to the crimes before killing himself, but it later emerged that he lied to protect somebody else – possibly one of his 13 foster children. The police now have a lead on another of his grownup foster kids, Trevor Dell –but when the CSIs arrive at his flat, they find him beaten to death on the bathroom floor.

Grissom suspects that the serial killer may have got there first when he finds a miniature doll of Trevor in the apartment. The doll boasts a tiny bracelet with Trevor’s name on it – yet the figure does not match the body and there is no replica scene to be found. “Maybe this one wasn’t planned,” Sara says. “Maybe the miniature killer has to make the miniature after the fact.”

DNA from a partial fingerprint on the doll reveals the surprising truth that the killer is a woman. “Female serial killers are rare enough,” Grissom muses. “Delusional psychosis in women – rarer still.” Nick cannot believe that a woman could have beaten Trevor to death, so he looks again at the cause of death, and discovers that he was electrocuted. A second look at the scene reveals that Trevor’s sink was electrified by the neighbour.

The police burst into the neighbouring apartment and arrest the occupant, who quickly confesses to stealing electricity from his neighbour by attaching cables to his supply. “So the genius steals power from his neighbour and ends up electrifying Trevor’s sink,” Catherine concludes. Trevor Dell’s death was nothing more than an accident – yet this does not explain the presence of the doll.

Grissom traces the person who made the bracelet on the doll and finds out who ordered it: a twentysomething girl named Natalie. Sofia pulls the name ‘Natalie Davis’ out of Ernie Dell’s file and Grissom and Catherine go to speak with Natalie’s biological father, Christopher Davis, who relates their tragic story: Natalie killed her baby sister when she was just six by pushing her out of a tree house. Davis gave her up for fostering and she was eventually cared for by Ernie Dell. Both Davis and another of Natalie’s foster parents testify that Natalie was deeply disturbed.

With the suspect identified, Grissom returns to the lab to find a new replica has been left in his office, showing a car turned over in the desert. Beneath the car, a trapped figure waves its arm. Lifting the car off, Grissom’s worst nightmare is realised when he finds a tiny doll of Sara.

A search reveals that Sara is missing and the CSIs race to pull together the evidence. It transpires that Natalie is a cleaner at police headquarters and planted the replica in Grissom’s office herself. She also recently bought a wrecked car in order to stage the latest crime scene.

The CSIs realise that Natalie has departed from her normal methods but are unable to explain why – until Grissom reveals that her motives are personal: “This girl holds me responsible for the death of Ernie Dell,” he says. “I took away the only person she ever loved, so she’s going to do the same thing to me…” With his relationship out in the open, can Grissom and his team finally catch the killer? And will they be in time to rescue Sara from her terrible fate?

csi: crime scene investigation
the good, the bad and the dominatrix (23/24)
21.00–22.00

The successful Las Vegas-based forensics drama continues its seventh season. This week, Catherine and Brass investigate when dominatrix Lady Heather is almost strangled to death at a Wild West theme park; and Warrick and Nick look into the death of a young woman apparently hit by a taxi cab.

An old acquaintance re-enters Grissom’s life this week when Lady Heather (Melinda Clarke, ‘The OC’), the notorious dominatrix, is found half-dead by a night-watchman at a Wild West theme park. As Heather is rushed to hospital, Sara and Catherine sweep the scene for clues. Catherine reflects that Lady Heather is “the only woman I’ve ever seen rattle Grissom,” and adds, “they had chemistry” –unaware that her musings on Heather and Grissom’s relationship are making Sara uncomfortable.

Sara is curious to know more about Lady Heather, but her attempts to collect DNA samples from her at the hospital are rebuffed, while the dominatrix refuses to answer Brass’s questions. A concerned Grissom has better luck at extracting her story: “I was planning an Old-West party,” Lady Heather explains, “and I was checking out the facilities.” She claims the theme park’s owner gave her permission to be there at night, but she will not say who it was that almost garrotted her with a rope, and quickly checks out of hospital.

Evidence shows that Lady Heather may have endured three strangulation attempts, and could have been sexually assaulted – yet she did not fight back. An appalled Grissom cannot understand why Heather is protecting her attacker: “This makes no sense,” he says. “Why didn’t she fight?”

The case takes a sudden turn when the nightwatchman is found dead. The police theorise that he could have been involved in Heather’s attack – only for her to get her revenge on him. Brass and Catherine head to Heather’s house with a search warrant and demand to know her whereabouts at the time of the watchman’s death, only for an unexpected figure to step forward and provide her with an alibi: Grissom. “She was here with me,” he says. A furious Catherine cannot believe that Grissom has planted himself in the middle of an investigation, while Sara is confounded by her lover’s behaviour. Can Grissom explain his actions and get to the bottom of the case?

Also this week, Warrick and Nick probe the death of a young woman apparently hit by a car. The victim turns out to be a kleptomaniac who was picked up by a foreign taxi driver in a black and yellow cab. Footage from the cab’s onboard camera indicates that the woman picked the driver’s pocket before getting out – giving him motive for running her down. But further evidence in the form of paint flecks from the scene indicates a second cab was involved. Was the young woman a victim of two battling taxis?

csi: crime scene investigation
leapin’ lizards (22/24)
21.00–22.00

The successful Las Vegas-based forensics drama continues its seventh season. This week, the disappearance of a casino employee leads the police to uncover a UFO cult that believes reptilian aliens are taking over the world.

On a dusty ranch in the desert, heavily-armed SWAT police have a suspect surrounded. Holed up in his farmhouse, the man engages the police in a shootout before finally turning a gun on himself. The dead man is Hank Connors, and the police believe he may have been involved in the disappearance of casino card dealer China De Vere one week before. Connors was in a UFO club with China’s husband Preston, who is also missing. The CSIs begin a sweep of the ranch and soon make a gruesome discovery in the barn: China’s head is mounted to the wall like the head of a stuffed animal.

A subsequent search of Connor’s house reveals a wealth of information on the UFO cult. Grissom dusts off a film of the group’s leader outlining his belief that reptilian aliens are trying to conquer the planet. The cult’s propaganda claims that the aliens can only be killed by having their heads severed with a sword – as with China De Vere. “So Connors cut off her head because he thought she was a serpent from outer space?” Sara asks. Meanwhile, Nick finds bones from the rest of China’s body in the pigsty and backyard.

Suspicion now falls on Connor’s friend Shannon Turner (Ally Sheedy, ‘The Breakfast Club’), who initially claims not to know China De Vere. She bites Greg’s hand when he tries to take DNA from her, but further incriminating evidence surfaces when Catherine discovers a sword in Shannon’s house and a mug bearing a photo of Shannon with China’s husband Preston. Prints from the sword match those of Shannon, while lab tech Archie discovers CCTV footage of her in the casino, playing cards at China’s table and making friends with her. “I think she was gaining her trust – stalking her,” Sara says.

Brass draws the pieces together and lays them before Shannon: “You killed China and you got Connors to help you move the body,” he says. Brass also tells her his theory about what happened to the missing Preston: “Connors killed Preston because he was obsessed with you and he wanted to eliminate the competition,” he says. But Shannon insists that Preston cannot be killed and is in fact over 4,000 years old: “Preston is a great man,” she says. “He has the wisdom of the ages.” Shannon reveals that China was a dangerous reptile and, as a self-styled “Protector of Mankind”, she was obliged to kill her.

But what appears to be a closed case takes a sharp turn when Brass answers a call from a sheriff who has found a naked man wandering the desert. The man is none other than Preston De Vere, who says that he was abducted by aliens: “I was a captive, held against my will,” he says. Preston claims not to know that his wife is dead, and says that he was with another member of the UFO cult on the night in question. Brass knows that Preston and Shannon were close, but can he prove that they killed China together? In order to expose the manipulative Preston, Brass and Grissom visit a meeting of the UFO cult. But the cult’s members believe that the police are alien lizards, and refuse to talk to them…

csi: crime scene investigation
lab rats (20/24)
21.00–22.00

The successful Las Vegas-based forensics drama continues its seventh season. This week’s episode is a departure for CSI, as the focus turns to the crime lab technicians. Hodges convinces his fellow techs that Grissom needs their help in cracking the replica killer case, so they review each of the murders.

It is a busy night in Vegas as the CSIs handle multiple cases. With Grissom occupied, lab tech David Hodges (guest star Wallace Langham) comes up with a covert plan to help crack the replica killer case. The killer has struck four times, leaving a model of the crime scene at each location. Hodges gathers his fellow techs Archie Johnson, Henry Andrews and Mandy Webster and implies that Grissom needs a hand: “We have one shift to show what we’re made of,” he says.

Hodges calls a meeting in Grissom’s office to discuss the first two victims: Izzy Delancy (see the episodes ‘Built to Kill’, Parts 1 and 2) and Penny Garden (see the episode ‘Post Mortem’). Their colleague Wendy Simms (guest star Liz Vassey) joins them to study the third victim, Raymundo Suarez (see the episode ‘Loco Motives’). This case led to a man named Ernie Dell confessing to the murders before killing himself.

Hodges breaks up the meeting to remonstrate with Simms, telling her that he did not include her in the plan because she dominates the group: “You think you’re too cool!” he snaps.However, Simms sticks around as they review the fourth case, the murder of Barbara Tallman (see the episode ‘Monster in the Box’). Ernie Dell’s confession was found to be false and his son Lionel was interviewed as a suspect.

The techs realise that the only link between the cases was a phone number called by all the victims. “What happened when they called the number?” Simms asks. When Hodges cannot provide an answer, she impulsively dials the number on his phone, only to get a computerised answer message.

Hodges, Andrews and Simms try to list the common features between the crimes. They rule out several factors – including food, music and flowers – because the Suarez case does not fit. Hodges examines the Suarez replica again and discovers a tiny canister containing bleach. He realises that bleach was present at all the scenes except for the Garden case – could it be there too?

Hodges is interrupted by Simms, who tells him that she is fed up of sneaking around behind the CSIs’ backs. “What makes you think if the CSIs can’t solve this, we can?” she asks. Later, Simms realises that Hodges lied about Grissom asking for their help, and confronts him angrily. “You put all of us at risk here!” she says. Hodges explains that it is his “lucky day”: a string of good fortune on his way to work prompted him to look into the replica killer case.

Hodges’ persistence pays off when he discovers a bleach coupon in the Garden replica. He has found a common theme. Grissom appears, looking unimpressed: “This better be good, Dave!” he growls, before Hodges outlines his theory that bleach may have been the trigger for the killer. Grissom’s interest is piqued. Has Hodges’ discovery provided a breakthrough?

Also this week, Grissom helps Robbins in the morgue with the body of a man found in a lake. Movement inside the corpse’s stomach results in a gruesome explosion, as a rat bursts out and scurries off into the shadows. Grissom leads the morgue staff in a hunt for the slippery rodent.

csi: crime scene investigation
monster in the box (16/24)
21.00–22.00

The successful Las Vegas-based forensics drama continues its seventh season. Tonight, Grissom receives another replica crime scene and realises that the miniature serial killer is still on the loose. With only two days to go before the crime is due to occur, the CSIs must locate the scene and save the victim before it is too late.

Grissom is stunned to receive another miniature crime scene in the mail. The package has been waiting for him while he was away on sabbatical. The model shows a living room with a woman’s body lying on a sofa, and seems to be the work of the ‘miniature’ killer who has killed three people. Yet a man named Ernie Dell already confessed to the crimes and killed himself (see ‘Loco Motives’). This package was postmarked after Dell died and the date on the newspaper in the miniature is two days hence. “This murder hasn’t happened yet,” Grissom surmises. It would seem that the killer is still alive and, somewhere, a woman is in danger.

As Grissom inspects the replica, Hodges wonders if the victim is to be poisoned or smothered. “It doesn’t matter how she dies if we can’t figure out who she is or where she is,” Grissom replies. But a set of restaurant flyers in the model provide a clue. Grissom narrows down the delivery area and the police begin searching several city blocks for a building that matches the exterior of the model. Warrick spots the building and the doorman identifies the room as the apartment of Dr Barbara Tallman. Entering the flat, Nick and Warrick find Tallman confused and disorientated, but alive.

Dr Tallman, a retired psychotherapist, cannot think of anyone who would want to kill her. The police suspect that the killer’s arrival is imminent, so Sofia places an undercover cop dressed as Dr Tallman in her apartment, on the sofa. Sure enough, a man appears at the door and is detained. He identifies himself as Peyton Tallman, Barbara’s brother, and is quickly discounted as a suspect. Hours later, the killer has failed to show and Sofia calls off the surveillance, only to find that the undercover cop is dead. The crime scene is complete – but its intended target was missed.

The cause of the cop’s death was carbon monoxide poisoning. Nick finds a timer device in the chimney that closed the flue and allowed the fumes to enter the room. “It could have easily been put in place a month ago,” he says, which means that the killer had no intention of being at the scene.

Back at the lab, Grissom gets more bad news. Barbara Tallman has been found dead on her sofa. The crime scene is now “perfect”. But there is a subtle difference – this time there are liquid traces on her body. The liquid is identified as tears, but there are no tracts on Tallman’s face. “I don’t think the victim was crying,” Catherine says. “I think the killer was.” When Doc Robbins reveals that Tallman had Parkinson’s disease, and DNA evidence leads to the guilty party, her death makes sense. Her murderer was not the miniature killer, but somebody with a much more humane motive.

Also this week, while Grissom is occupied with the Tallman case, Sara reviews the Ernie Dell file with Nick and Warrick. They suspect that Dell had a reason for making a false confession: “I think he was trying to protect someone,” Sara says. “Someone that he cared a lot about.” Sara and Greg discover that Dell had a son who may be connected with the murders. But the son vehemently denies any involvement, telling them that he was estranged from his father and even changed his name. Dell did, however, have dozens of foster children to whom he was more closely attached. Could one of them be the serial killer?

csi: crime scene investigation
sweet jane (12/24) 21.00–22.00

The phenomenally successful Las Vegas-based forensics drama continues its seventh season. In this week’s episode, the team are joined by a new CSI, Michael Keppler, who assists them on a case involving four unidentified women murdered over a span of 30 years.

The ever-changing face of Las Vegas has thrown up another victim – a young woman found dead near the highway. Catherine is first on the scene, joined by a new face – CSI Michael Keppler (Liev Schreiber, ‘The Omen’, ‘Scream’), who is filling in for Grissom while he is away on sabbatical.

A quick examination of the victim reveals that she was swabbed with alcohol to remove any marks. “Unlike most men, this one knows how to clean up after himself,” observes Catherine. They run the girl’s details through a directory of missing people and find a match: she is Veronica Sorenson, a 17year-old runaway.

The autopsy reveals that Veronica was raped while high on ecstasy. Keppler hypothesises that the killer was not a first-timer and that his preferred type of victim is probably fixed. They search the database for unsolved homicides resembling Veronica’s case and come up with three matches: in 1975, 1989 and 1999.

The CSIs each take a file and report back. The 1999 victim was washed liked Veronica but there was almost no information in the file – “shoddy police work”, as Nick puts it. The 1989 victim, meanwhile, was not washed, unlike the other two, indicating that the killer’s method may have evolved: “Practice makes perfect,” Keppler says. Lastly, the victim from 1975 was different in that she was fully clothed. Keppler’s background in criminal profiling tells him that all four girls were murdered by the same man. When Catherine reminds him that he is a CSI now, not a profiler, Keppler asks, “what’s the difference?” “Evidence,” Catherine shoots back. She wants leads and IDs rather than theories.

Autopsy records from the 1999 victim reveal evidence of a sedative, but the only way to get further information from the older cases is to exhume the bodies. Once exhumed, Robbins examines the girl from 1975 and discovers an old–style silver tooth. Robbins realises that Veronica had a similar filling, and that the sedative in the 1999 corpse was once commonly used in dentistry. Could the killer be a dentist?

An online search by Keppler points to a clinic that could be connected with all four cases, so he and Catherine pay a visit. The receptionist confirms that a Dr Dave Lowry worked on Veronica Sampson, and directs them to the restaurant where Lowry is having lunch.

Silver-haired ‘Dr Dave’ (Ned Beatty, ‘Superman’, ‘Deliverance’) proves to be a genial figure –“He kind of reminds me of my Uncle Ralph,” Keppler deadpans. Lowry is unfazed by the gruesome photographs he is shown, and offers little for the detectives to go on. But back in the lab, Nick has found pictures from the 1989 case that show a bite mark on the victim’s shoulder. Catherine and Keppler return to Lowry’s clinic to acquire his dental impression.

A comparison of the teeth marks draws a blank, but something about the symmetry of Dr Lowry’s teeth sets Keppler thinking: “Would you go to a dentist with bad teeth?” he asks Catherine. Their only chance to convict Dr Lowry now lies in proving that the cheerful dentist has had dental work since the crime – and thereby finally solve the murders of these women, years after their brutal deaths.

csi: crime scene investigation
sweet jane (12/24) 21.00–22.00

The phenomenally successful Las Vegas-based forensics drama continues its seventh season. In this week’s episode, the team are joined by a new CSI, Michael Keppler, who assists them on a case involving four unidentified women murdered over a span of 30 years.

The ever-changing face of Las Vegas has thrown up another victim – a young woman found dead near the highway. Catherine is first on the scene, joined by a new face – CSI Michael Keppler (Liev Schreiber, ‘The Omen’, ‘Scream’), who is filling in for Grissom while he is away on sabbatical.

A quick examination of the victim reveals that she was swabbed with alcohol to remove any marks. “Unlike most men, this one knows how to clean up after himself,” observes Catherine. They run the girl’s details through a directory of missing people and find a match: she is Veronica Sorenson, a 17year-old runaway.

The autopsy reveals that Veronica was raped while high on ecstasy. Keppler hypothesises that the killer was not a first-timer and that his preferred type of victim is probably fixed. They search the database for unsolved homicides resembling Veronica’s case and come up with three matches: in 1975, 1989 and 1999.

The CSIs each take a file and report back. The 1999 victim was washed liked Veronica but there was almost no information in the file – “shoddy police work”, as Nick puts it. The 1989 victim, meanwhile, was not washed, unlike the other two, indicating that the killer’s method may have evolved: “Practice makes perfect,” Keppler says. Lastly, the victim from 1975 was different in that she was fully clothed. Keppler’s background in criminal profiling tells him that all four girls were murdered by the same man. When Catherine reminds him that he is a CSI now, not a profiler, Keppler asks, “what’s the difference?” “Evidence,” Catherine shoots back. She wants leads and IDs rather than theories.

Autopsy records from the 1999 victim reveal evidence of a sedative, but the only way to get further information from the older cases is to exhume the bodies. Once exhumed, Robbins examines the girl from 1975 and discovers an old–style silver tooth. Robbins realises that Veronica had a similar filling, and that the sedative in the 1999 corpse was once commonly used in dentistry. Could the killer be a dentist?

An online search by Keppler points to a clinic that could be connected with all four cases, so he and Catherine pay a visit. The receptionist confirms that a Dr Dave Lowry worked on Veronica Sampson, and directs them to the restaurant where Lowry is having lunch.

Silver-haired ‘Dr Dave’ (Ned Beatty, ‘Superman’, ‘Deliverance’) proves to be a genial figure –“He kind of reminds me of my Uncle Ralph,” Keppler deadpans. Lowry is unfazed by the gruesome photographs he is shown, and offers little for the detectives to go on. But back in the lab, Nick has found pictures from the 1989 case that show a bite mark on the victim’s shoulder. Catherine and Keppler return to Lowry’s clinic to acquire his dental impression.

A comparison of the teeth marks draws a blank, but something about the symmetry of Dr Lowry’s teeth sets Keppler thinking: “Would you go to a dentist with bad teeth?” he asks Catherine. Their only chance to convict Dr Lowry now lies in proving that the cheerful dentist has had dental work since the crime – and thereby finally solve the murders of these women, years after their brutal deaths.

csi: crime scene investigation
sweet jane (12/24) 21.00–22.00

The phenomenally successful Las Vegas-based forensics drama continues its seventh season. In this week’s episode, the team are joined by a new CSI, Michael Keppler, who assists them on a case involving four unidentified women murdered over a span of 30 years.

The ever-changing face of Las Vegas has thrown up another victim – a young woman found dead near the highway. Catherine is first on the scene, joined by a new face – CSI Michael Keppler (Liev Schreiber, ‘The Omen’, ‘Scream’), who is filling in for Grissom while he is away on sabbatical.

A quick examination of the victim reveals that she was swabbed with alcohol to remove any marks. “Unlike most men, this one knows how to clean up after himself,” observes Catherine. They run the girl’s details through a directory of missing people and find a match: she is Veronica Sorenson, a 17year-old runaway.

The autopsy reveals that Veronica was raped while high on ecstasy. Keppler hypothesises that the killer was not a first-timer and that his preferred type of victim is probably fixed. They search the database for unsolved homicides resembling Veronica’s case and come up with three matches: in 1975, 1989 and 1999.

The CSIs each take a file and report back. The 1999 victim was washed liked Veronica but there was almost no information in the file – “shoddy police work”, as Nick puts it. The 1989 victim, meanwhile, was not washed, unlike the other two, indicating that the killer’s method may have evolved: “Practice makes perfect,” Keppler says. Lastly, the victim from 1975 was different in that she was fully clothed. Keppler’s background in criminal profiling tells him that all four girls were murdered by the same man. When Catherine reminds him that he is a CSI now, not a profiler, Keppler asks, “what’s the difference?” “Evidence,” Catherine shoots back. She wants leads and IDs rather than theories.

Autopsy records from the 1999 victim reveal evidence of a sedative, but the only way to get further information from the older cases is to exhume the bodies. Once exhumed, Robbins examines the girl from 1975 and discovers an old–style silver tooth. Robbins realises that Veronica had a similar filling, and that the sedative in the 1999 corpse was once commonly used in dentistry. Could the killer be a dentist?

An online search by Keppler points to a clinic that could be connected with all four cases, so he and Catherine pay a visit. The receptionist confirms that a Dr Dave Lowry worked on Veronica Sampson, and directs them to the restaurant where Lowry is having lunch.

Silver-haired ‘Dr Dave’ (Ned Beatty, ‘Superman’, ‘Deliverance’) proves to be a genial figure –“He kind of reminds me of my Uncle Ralph,” Keppler deadpans. Lowry is unfazed by the gruesome photographs he is shown, and offers little for the detectives to go on. But back in the lab, Nick has found pictures from the 1989 case that show a bite mark on the victim’s shoulder. Catherine and Keppler return to Lowry’s clinic to acquire his dental impression.

A comparison of the teeth marks draws a blank, but something about the symmetry of Dr Lowry’s teeth sets Keppler thinking: “Would you go to a dentist with bad teeth?” he asks Catherine. Their only chance to convict Dr Lowry now lies in proving that the cheerful dentist has had dental work since the crime – and thereby finally solve the murders of these women, years after their brutal deaths.

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