Doctor Doctor

doctor doctor (21/25)
09.30–10.30

The nation’s favourite GP, Dr Mark Porter, presents the daily medical show that tackles a diverse range of issues in front of a live studio audience. Offering viewers expert advice on all things health-related, Mark co-presents the show with leading psychiatrist Dr Raj Persaud, and is joined by a changing panel of top medical specialists. With no subject considered taboo, the experts field a variety of viewers’ questions about their physical and mental wellbeing, focusing on a different set of medical issues every day.

Forming the UK’s first TV doctor’s surgery, the new format of Doctor Doctor is interactive, allowing viewers the chance to ask questions via text, internet or phone. Members of the studio audience will also find out how healthy they are, with those in need of help being given advice on the spot.

However, there is much more to Doctor Doctor than the daily live shows –it also serves as an important information service for viewers at home. In addition to comprehensive fact sheets for the key topics covered in the series, there is a selfhelp video-on-demand service available online, covering a diverse range of topical subjects.

Throughout the series, Mark and Raj will be talking to some well-known celebrities about their ailments and exploring how they have overcome them. This morning’s show explores the issues surrounding anxiety disorders, and presents an A-to-Z guide to bladder complaints.

Tuesday’s programme gives pointers on how to make kids eat just about anything, and takes a look at Alzheimer’s disease.

Fertility is the subject of Wednesday’s edition, which also provides guidance on how to identify Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) in children.

On Thursday, the programme examines stress in the workplace, and suggests helpful ways to keep your cool. There is also advice on medicine management, including why it is important to always finish a course of treatment.

Rounding off the series on Friday, the main topic is salt. How much do you really eat? Plus, advice on how to keep your back in tip-top shape.

doctor doctor (16/25)
09.30–10.30

The nation’s favourite GP, Dr Mark Porter, presents the daily medical show that tackles a diverse range of issues in front of a live studio audience. Offering viewers expert advice on all things health-related, Mark co-presents the show with leading psychiatrist Dr Raj Persaud, and is joined by a changing panel of top medical specialists. With no subject considered taboo, the experts field a variety of viewers’ questions about their physical and mental wellbeing, focusing on a different set of medical issues every day.

Forming the UK’s first TV doctor’s surgery, the new format of Doctor Doctor is interactive, allowing viewers the chance to ask questions via text, internet or phone. Members of the studio audience will also find out how healthy they are, with those in need of help being given advice on the spot.

However, there is much more to Doctor Doctor than the daily live shows –it also serves as an important information service for viewers at home. In addition to comprehensive fact sheets for the key topics covered in the series, there is a self-help video-on-demand service available online, covering a diverse range of topical subjects.

Throughout the series, Mark and Raj will be talking to some well-known celebrities about their ailments and exploring how they have overcome them. This morning’s show presents a parent’s guide to the MMR jab, as well as advice on how to tackle depression.

Tuesday’s programme shows how to keep your kid’s temperature in check, and exposes five myths about mental illness.

The subject of Wednesday’s edition is diabetes. Plus, guidance on how to stop stings and bites being a pain.

Thursday’sshow looks at what puts the ‘super’ into super foods, and investigates ME.

Friday’s programme deals with the issues surrounding breastfeeding, and offers advice on how best to identify and treat thrush.

doctor doctor (11/25)
09.30–10.30

The nation’s favourite GP, Dr Mark Porter, presents the daily medical show that tackles a diverse range of issues in front of a live studio audience. Offering viewers expert advice on all things health-related, Mark co-presents the show with leading psychiatrist Dr Raj Persaud, and is joined by a changing panel of top medical specialists. With no subject considered taboo, the experts field a variety of viewers’ questions about their physical and mental wellbeing, focusing on a different set of medical issues every day.

Forming the UK’s first TV doctor’s surgery, the new format of Doctor Doctor is interactive, allowing viewers the chance to ask questions via text, internet or phone. Members of the studio audience will also find out how healthy they are, with those in need of help being given advice on the spot.

However, there is much more to Doctor Doctor than the daily live shows –it also serves as an important information service for viewers at home. In addition to comprehensive fact sheets for the key topics covered in the series, there is a self-help video-on-demand service available online, covering a diverse range of topical subjects.

Throughout the series, Mark and Raj will be talking to some well-known celebrities about their ailments and exploring how they have overcome them. This morning’s show investigates ways to become smarter and provides advice on understanding your blood pressure.

TV presenter Melinda Messenger is the guest on Tuesday’s programme, which explores the subject of postnatal depression. Plus: what every man needs to know about his prostate.

The subject of Wednesday’s edition is osteoporosis, and there is also advice on whether you should switch to a natural sunscreen.

Thursday’s show takes a look at the latest surgical developments in the treatment of cataracts, and explains what every parent needs to know about meningitis.

Friday’s programme investigates how to say goodbye to panic attacks forever, and gives advice on ways to manage Crohn’s disease.

doctor doctor (6/25)
09.30–10.30

The nation’s favourite GP, Dr Mark Porter, presents the daily medical show that tackles a diverse range of issues in front of a live studio audience. Offering viewers expert advice on all things health-related, Mark co-presents the show with leading psychiatrist Dr Raj Persaud, and is joined by a changing panel of top medical specialists. With no subject considered taboo, the experts field a variety of viewers’ questions about their physical and mental wellbeing, focusing on a different set of medical issues every day.

Forming the UK’s first TV doctor’s surgery, the new format of Doctor Doctor is interactive, allowing viewers the chance to ask questions via text, internet or phone. Members of the studio audience will also find out how healthy they are, with those in need of help being given advice on the spot.

However, there is much more to Doctor Doctor than the daily live shows –it also serves as an important information service for viewers at home. In addition to comprehensive fact sheets for the key topics covered in the series, there is a self-help video-on-demand service available online, covering a diverse range of topical subjects.

Throughout the series, Mark and Raj will be talking to some well-known celebrities about their ailments and how they have overcome them. Athlete Iwan Thomas is the special guest on this morning’s show, which focuses on feet.

The programme investigates cosmetic toe surgery and problems such as fungal nail infections, and explains how to have beautiful, healthy feet.

Tuesday’s programme explores the symptoms and treatment of bronchitis, and offers speedy solutions to unwelcome visitors like lice and worms.

The subject of Wednesday’s edition is breast cancer. The experts describe all the tests and treatments in plain English, and the special guests are singers Shaun Rogerson (‘The X-Factor’) and Linda Nolan.

Thursday’s show takes a look at eating disorders and empty nest syndrome; and Friday’s programme investigates the latest in asthma treatments. With special guest Helen Lederer (‘Absolutely Fabulous’).

doctor doctor: interview with dr raj persaud

Dr Raj Persaud returns to our screens this week as a co-presenter of Doctor Doctor, the new interactive health show beginning today on Five. He is a consultant psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital in London –one of the leading research and teaching institutions in Europe –and Gresham Professor for Public Understanding of Psychiatry. He has won a number of awards in his field and is widely published. His most recent publication, ‘The Mind: A User’s Guide’, is written in conjunction with the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

tell us a bit about your new series “Basically, ‘Doctor Doctor’ is a unique programme in that the audience gets to hear from Dr Mark Porter, myself and other top experts in the medical profession, talking directly about the kind of health issues that concern the public. It is also unique in that we do a live phone-in, where people at home can gain access to Dr Porter and myself.”

what issues will you be covering in the show? “We will be covering a wide variety of disorders, including a lot of things that people often find quite difficult to talk about, like sexual problems, for example. Because I’m a psychiatrist and Mark’s a GP, we’ll also be covering a lot of psychological, emotional and mental health issues, as well as things that people might be surprised to learn can be considered medical –like marital problems.”

how important is the show’s interactive element? “What we’ve found from the last few series is that people find the accessibility of the programme very important –the fact that they can ring up and be put through on air, or ring up for feedback and we can provide information. Another thing that we can do is demonstrate stuff. For example, one famous demonstration we did showed how to give an injection if someone suffered from an anaphylactic shock. We do lots of demonstrations which, because of the visual medium of television, allow us to help the public learn skills that they will need in the practice of saving lives.”

do you aim to reduce stigma through your television work? “I’ve written a book with the Royal College of Psychiatrists which is all about making people more aware of how common psychological and psychiatric problems are. Recent research suggests that one in two Europeans will, at some time in their lives, suffer from severe enough emotional problems as to warrant a formal psychiatric diagnosis. It is still taboo and there is still a stigma attached to it, but there are also many medical problems that are embarrassing. One of our focuses in ‘Doctor Doctor’ will be disorders that people need to recognise, selfdiagnose and be more open about.”

how does your public persona affect your consultation work? “My most important work is with the inpatients who suffer severe mental health problems at the Maudsley Hospital. What I find tends to happen is that patients are much more likely to follow the advice that the ward and myself give them, because they have developed a relationship with me via the television and know and trust me.”

you said that one of you aims in this series was to “help make britain’s brains healthier”. how do you hope to achieve this? “We want to get people to start looking after their brains. For example, a lot of people realise that an hour’s walk a day is good for your physical health, but they might not realise that the sunlight exposure and the exercise are actually very powerful antidepressants. Also, an hour’s walk a day can delay the onset of dementia. There is a plethora of things that people can do to better look after their brains. There are lots of practical points throughout the series that anyone can practise – the series is very much focused on self-help.”

doctor doctor (1/25)
09.30–10.30

The nation’s favourite GP, Dr Mark Porter, returns to Five this week with the daily medical show that tackles a diverse range of issues in front of a live studio audience. Offering viewers expert advice on all things health-related, Mark co-presents the show with leading psychiatrist Dr Raj Persaud, and is joined by a changing panel of top medical specialists. With no subject considered taboo, the experts field a variety of viewers’ questions about their physical and mental wellbeing, focusing on a different set of medical issues every day.

Forming the UK’s first TV doctor’s surgery, the new format of Doctor Doctor is interactive, allowing viewers the chance to put questions to the experts via text, the internet or phone. Members of the studio audience will all have relevant experiences to share, and serve as guinea pigs for the in-house doctors. Over the course of the series, they will have their blood, urine, breathing, eating habits and fitness tested. Every day, the audience members will find out just how healthy they are, with those in need of help being given advice on the spot.

However, there is much more to Doctor Doctor than the daily live shows –it also serves as an important information service for viewers at home. In addition to comprehensive fact sheets for the key topics covered in the series, there is a self-help video-on-demand service available online, covering a diverse range of topical subjects.

Throughout the series, Mark and Raj will be talking to some well-known celebrities about their ailments and how they have overcome them.

This morning’s show deals with heart problems and covers such aspects as spotting symptoms, the latest treatments and prevention.

Tuesday’s programme focuses on deep-vein thrombosis, exploring what the condition is and how best to prevent it.

The subject of Wednesday’s edition is sleep problems. From night terrors to sleepwalking, the experts advise how to ensure a good night’s sleep.

On Thursday, the experts explore obesity and examine why so many Britons over-eat.

And rounding off the week’s episodes, Friday’s edition explores MRSA: what are the risks, and what is the NHS doing about it?

  • BBC One
  • BBC Two
  • BBC Three
  • ITV1
  • ITV2
  • 4
  • E4
  • Film4
  • More4
  • Five
  • Fiver
  • Sky1