five news

Five has a commissioned a Five News Special fast turnaround one hour documentary about the two men at the centre of the historic political coalition, it was announced today (FRI).

In Dave and Nick: Where Did It All Go Right, Five News’ Chief Correspondent Jonathan Samuels tells the fascinating story of the unlikely partnership of Britain’s new Prime Minister, David Cameron and his deputy, Nick Clegg.  He delves into the backbiting, the fighting, and the courting and romancing which finally led two sworn political enemies to their tryst in the Rose Garden of Number 10.

Inspired by the extraordinary double header press conference which ushered in the first coalition Government since the war, this documentary will tell viewers more about both men and their personal and political backgrounds.

Samuels will ask if these two public school boys really have anything in common apart from a privileged education, super-achieving wives and a thirst for political power.  Are they Westminster’s answer to Ant and Dec? Will they last as long as Brad and Angelina?  And finally, is it true romance or just a shotgun wedding?

The documentary will include interviews with Lembit Opik, Boris Johnson, Kathy Lette, Toby Young, Dick & Dom and Five News’ Political Editor Andy Bell, who asked the infamous ‘joke’ question in the Rose Garden at Number 10.

This programme comes three weeks after Five’s successful fast-turnaround documentary, Volcanic Ash: Flight of Terror, which performed well above slot average with 1.7million viewers and a 9.1 per cent share amongst all viewers.

James Partridge, CEO of Changing Faces, the UK’s leading disfigurement charity, will be presenting the lunchtime bulletin on Five News at 12.45pm from 16th November for a week. A recent YouGov survey commissioned by Five News showed that:

When given a list of the most common facial disfigurements a TV presenter could have, 64% said none of them would cause them to change channel.

Almost half, 44% thought that it would be good to have people with facial disfigurements presenting TV shows.

Only 21% of those questioned agreed they would feel uncomfortable seeing someone with a facial disfigurement presenting a TV show.

Winnie Coutinho, Head of Campaigns and Communications at Changing Faces, said: “We believe that television can play a big role in changing attitudes and breaking down prejudices. Changing Faces is keen to learn whether the public would really accept someone with a disfigurement in this role once they see James Partridge reading the news next week.”

David Kermode, Five News Editor, added: “James makes a welcome addition to our presenting line up for the week that he is with us.  We are all looking forward to working with him and, at the same time, creating some debate around an important issue in society.”

Five News has met with the family of missing 40 year old Quentin Adams in Aberdeenshire as part of its ‘Missing Month’ taking place throughout August, in association with the charity Missing People.

Tonight, Five News reporter Jane Dougall will be shown speaking to Carol Law, the sister of Quentin Adams who went missing in November last year when he left to buy cigarettes and never came back. His family contacted the police but after an extensive investigation nothing has been uncovered.

Not knowing where Quentin is or what has happened to him has completely traumatised his family. They say they can’t continue with their lives until they know what happened to Quentin the day he walked away . His sister Carol tells Five News:

“Every day you wake up and I think, oh my gosh, there’s still this going on. Every day you hope you get a letter or a phone call or you see him somewhere and even in the back of my mind wishing that the police would maybe just come to your door as well and just say we know where he is.

“I don’t think that he’s committed suicide, I don’t. There’s something inside me that tells me that I know he hasn’t done that. I think he is somewhere trying to carry on, I’ve just got this inner belief that he is out there trying to carry on somewhere.”

When asked what she would say if he was watching this report Carol replied:

“I’d say just Quentin please I miss you so much, just let us know you’re ok, just please let us know you’re alright cause it’s hard, we miss you, we love you.”

During ‘Missing Month’, Five News is focusing on the on the plight of some of the UK’s many thousands of missing people and their families, with a special ‘Missing’ strand running through its programmes.

Five News is working with the charity ‘Missing People’ and is featuring a different package every week of August, highlighting either a specific missing person’s case or the wider work of the police and the charity in their quest to reconnect families in the UK with their missing relatives.

In addition, each day of the week on Five News’ 5pm and 7pm bulletins a short photo appeal for a different missing person will feature on air at the end of each programme.

Vikki Cook, Deputy Editor of Five News said: “By dedicating August as Missing month, we hope that we can help to bring to the public attention some of the outstanding missing person’s cases and perhaps even help to re-unite some families with their missing relatives.”

Alison Cowan, Director of Fundraising and Marketing at Missing People said, “More than 200,000 incidents of missing people are recorded each year, two thirds of whom are under 19. The charity works to support, find and safeguard all those affected by the issue of missing. We are delighted that Five News has thrown their support behind this important issue. Our hope is that the awareness raised by the Missing Month will help us to reunite some of the families who are living in limbo after the disappearance of a loved one, and make the public aware of the charity’s need for funds. If you have a sighting or information about a missing person, please call Missing People confidentially on Freefone 0500 700 700. Missing People also provides a 24 hour Freefone Message Home service (0800 700 740) to enable missing adults such as Quentin, and the estimated 70,000 adults who are reported missing each year, to regain contact with their familes. Recently – released figures from the charity reveal that the line received over 32,000 calls in 2007-8.”

Five News has joined Manchester Police on the hunt for missing people as part of its ‘Missing Month’ taking place throughout August.

Any quotes used from the report must credit Five News

Tonight, Five News reporter Peter Lane will be seen following police officers in Manchester as they try to track missing people from the city. As part of the report, Peter looks at the process of finding missing people and follows area officer Julie Potts and PC Gordon Easton as they try and find missing local teenager, Patrick Doyle.

PC Gordon Easton tells Five News: ‘People just don’t walk out of their home for no reason at all. So there is generally a reason or background so we have then got to ask, sometimes some sensitive questions.’

During ‘Missing Month’, Five News is focusing on the on the plight of some of the UK’s many thousands of missing people and their families, with a special ‘Missing’ strand running through its programmes.

Five News is working with the charity ‘Missing People’ and will feature a different package every week of August, highlighting either a specific missing person’s case or the wider work of the police and the charity in their quest to reconnect families in the UK with their missing relatives.

In addition, each day of the week on Five News’ 5pm and 7pm bulletins a short photo appeal for a different missing person will feature on air at the end of each programme.

Vikki Cook, Deputy Editor of Five News said: “By dedicating August as Missing month, we hope that we can help to bring to the public attention some of the outstanding missing person’s cases and perhaps even help to re-unite some families with their missing relatives.”

Alison Cowan, Director of Fundraising and Marketing at Missing People said, “More than 200,000 incidents of missing people are recorded each year, two thirds of whom are under 19. The charity works to support, find and safeguard all those affected by the issue of missing. We are delighted that Five News has thrown their support behind this important issue. Our hope is that the awareness raised by the Missing Month will help us to reunite some of the families who are living in limbo after the disappearance of a loved one, and make the public aware of the charity’s need for funds.”

Five is to launch a new early evening news magazine show hosted by Ian Wright, Melinda Messenger and Kate Walsh of The Apprentice fame, it was announced today.

The three hosts have been hired for their smart, witty opinions and their common sense approach to the big stories and talking points that have caught the public’s attention for the hour-long show, Live From Studio Five.  The show will be produced by Sky News and will launch in September.

Richard Woolfe, Channel Controller at Five, said: “This is news – but not as you know it.  It’s a chatty, forthright spirited magazine.  Ian, Melinda and Kate have warmth and attitude – they are a high energy, up front, breath of fresh air.

“For the first time on British TV presenters will be passionately discussing news events and expressing their no holds barred opinions in a way that reflects the way we all interact and react to the biggest stories of the day.

“With three such opinionated yet diverse hosts, the show is guaranteed to be lively, entertaining, unpredictable, spontaneous and sometimes outrageous and controversial – just watch the sparks fly.

“Every other broadcaster’s schedule at this time is totally predictable and I believe there’s a huge opportunity for a show like this which will shake things up, put Five on the map and get viewers talking about the channel.  Five has a fantastic record of innovation in news programming and this show will take that to the next level.”

The news, talk and entertainment show will bring you the day’s most gripping stories in the clearest, most entertaining way. It will mix live and recorded location reports, celebrity interviews, gossip and banter all based around that day’s popular news agenda.  

Viewers can expect to be entertained, informed, surprised and occasionally shocked as the presenters give us their personal take on that day’s events – all backed up by a team of Five News reporters and the news-gathering resources of  Sky News.  

Ian Wright said: “I can’t wait to get cracking on the new series.  Melinda and Kate are great girls and I love the banter we already have.  I struggle to get a word in when those two get going!  It will be high energy, fast-paced and a great laugh.”

Melinda Messenger said: “I am very excited to be part of a brilliant, innovative new show.  I can’t wait to work with Ian and Kate who are fantastic and I think we are going to have lots of fun together.”

Kate Walsh added: “Becoming part of the presenting team on the new show is an exhilarating and thrilling challenge – and I love a challenge! I can’t wait to get stuck in to daily live TV, and the show promises to be a totally new way of reviewing the day’s news.  Ian and Melinda are both consummate professionals and great fun, and I’m looking forward to bringing a bit of me to the personality of the show.”

Live From Studio Five is a Sky News production for Five. The Editor is David Kermode, the Programme Editor is Vivek Sharma and the Director is James Haggar.

Five News is working with the charity ‘Missing People’ and will feature a different package every week of August, highlighting either a specific missing person’s case or the wider work of the police and the charity in their quest to reconnect families in the UK with their missing relatives.

In addition, each day of the week on Five News’ 5pm and 7pm bulletins a short photo appeal for a different missing person will feature on air at the end of each programme.

Vikki Cook, Deputy Editor of Five News said: “The latest high profile case of missing chef Claudia Lawrence again made us think about how devastating it must be to have a loved one, friend or colleague go missing and not get the answers you are desperate for.

“News can be a powerful medium for distributing information – and at Five News we want to make it a powerful medium for bringing in information as well. Missing People are the key charity working on the issue of missing with great credentials and experience of working with broadcast media partners.

“By dedicating August as Missing month, we hope that we can help to bring to the public attention some of the outstanding missing person’s cases and perhaps even help to re-unite some families with their missing relatives.”

Alison Cowan, Director of Fundraising and Marketing at Missing People said, “More than 200,000 incidents of missing people are recorded each year, two thirds of whom are under 19. The charity works to support, find and safeguard all those affected by the issue of missing. We are delighted that Five News has thrown their support behind this important issue. Our hope is that the awareness raised by the Missing Month will help us to reunite some of the families who are living in limbo after the disappearance of a loved one, and make the public aware of the charity’s need for funds.“

Supportive activity will include local and regional consumer and a Missing People charity presence on the Five News website.

Five News relaunched this year with Britain’s highest profile newsreader Natasha Kaplinsky as its new face. The relaunch included a new set, new graphical branding, a new website and a new editorial direction, with an emphasis on a more positive agenda. The relaunch saw audience figures for the flagship show at 5pm increase more than 50 per cent year-on-year, with even bigger rises in ABC1 and 16-34 viewing. Alongside Natasha, Five News continues to champion new talent too – with both Matt Barbet and Isla Traquair sitting in the hot seat during Natasha’s maternity leave.

This week, Natasha Kaplinsky joins Five News to anchor the 5pm and 7pm bulletins. Before her move to Five, she had a successful five-year spell at the BBC hosting Breakfast and the Ten O’Clock News.

Why did you decide to join five news?
“I was actually really happy at the BBC, but the team at Five got in touch with me to offer me the chance to present the news on my own. A new show and team was being put together and the opportunity to be in a studio on my own was really exciting. The team at Five had so many great ideas. It was a big decision for me.”

There has been a lot of speculation about your salary. did you jump ship for money?
“It is a generous package but it was never about money. If it had been, I wouldn’t have taken so long deciding whether to join!”

Are you nervous about the re-launch?
“I am not the type to get nervous. I am excited and I just want everything to go smoothly. It is the countdown now –it’s a bit like Christmas as everything goes by so quickly. We’ve been filming marketing shoots and promos, and now suddenly I am nearly going to be on air. Everything has been designed around this new launch, and I have never done anything like this before. Do I feel under pressure? Whenever there is anything new, people take a critical/analytical look. Look at the re-launch of ‘News at Ten’. I am just really looking forward to starting work at Five.”

Tell us more about the new show.
“There will be two bulletins on Five. Each will last 30 minutes. We will be offering something different to other channels’ news bulletins. We want people to feel uplifted after watching the news. I will be interviewing people at roughly 20 minutes past. I’m really looking forward to this as I enjoyed this aspect of the job on BBC Breakfast news.”

What is it about news presenting that you love?
“It’s very addictive and I just love being part of what is happening in the world. News presenting, however, is not just about reading from an autocue. You get involved in all sorts of aspects such as the writing, style and the way it is told. It’s an incredibly hard job. You have people shouting in your ear, things going on around you and yet you have to be as serene and calm as possible. It’s tough but I love the adrenaline.”

Do female newscasters get a raw deal?
“Yes, but it just comes with the territory. Female newscasters are cast as if they will do anything to get where they want. It’s just not like that at all.”

Have you ever cried when reading the news?
“Welling up happens a lot. There can be reports, such as a famine, flood or one about children, where you literally cannot watch it. But your job is to remain calm and give the information to viewers.” will you just be reading the news or do you plan to do other projects? “I would love to do some more programmes for Five in the future. For the time being though, I want to concentrate on making sure the news bulletin goes well.”

You left the bbc in october. what have you been doing since then?
“All sorts of things! Seeing friends and family. Going on holiday. It’s been really wonderful to have a break and it’s the first time I have been off work for this length of time since I was a teenager. But I am now really looking forward to starting work again.”

And finally, have you been keeping up with the dancing after winning ‘strictly come dancing’?
“No, not anymore! But I do still love the show and watch it all the time. The last series was fantastic!”

Saturday 16 –Friday 22 February on FIve

Natasha Kaplinsky is to be the new face of Five News in 2008.

Natasha is the regular presenter of BBC One’s Six O’Clock News and also guest presents on the BBC Ten O’Clock News.

She has starred in shows such as Who Do You Think You Are?, Children in Need and Strictly Come Dancing.

At Five Natasha Kaplinsky will present the main 5.30pm and 7pm news bulletins.

Natasha Kaplinsky said: “After five incredibly rewarding years at the BBC, I found the chance to work with the team at Five too exciting to pass up. Chris Shaw has an unrivalled track record in reinventing television news and I already know how talented Jay Hunt and David Kermode are, having worked with them at the BBC. Five has changed the face of news before, and now they’re going to do it again. I can’t wait to be a part of it.”

Chris Shaw, Senior Programme Controller at Five, said: “As one of the country’s leading news presenters Natasha has proved she has real authority, and with her BBC One shows she also demonstrated her warmth and star quality. I believe at Five we can bring all those qualities together in a new kind of news programme.”

Jay Hunt, Five’s Director of Programmes, said: “Natasha is one of the most talented broadcasters on British television. From the Six O’Clock News to Children in Need she has demonstrated her popularity with viewers. I am thrilled she has decided to join Five and become one of the key faces of the channel.”

Five News Editor, David Kermode, said: “Natasha is one of the brightest stars in broadcasting and I’m absolutely delighted that she’s joining Five News. She’s a great communicator, and has a really distinctive style that sets her apart.”

Before joining the BBC to present BBC Breakfast with Dermot Murnaghan, Natasha was a co-presenter on Sky News’ Live at Five following several months working on their Breakfast programme Sunrise in 2000. Prior to that she was a presenter on London Today and London Tonight. She also presented LWT’s Sunday morning current affairs programme Seven Days.

thursday, may 24th, 2007
kirsty young to leave five news

After ten years at Five, Kirsty Young is to step down from her role as the channel’s news anchor, it was announced today (THURS).

Kirsty has no immediate plans other than continuing to host Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs. She will leave Five News in the autumn. Her fellow news anchor John Suchet will continue to present Five News at 5.30pm and 7pm.

Kirsty said: “I couldn’t have worked anywhere better. I’ve been so happy at Five and I’ll miss the incredibly talented people in the news room but after ten years I feel it’s time for a change.

“Working in TV news has been a tremendously exciting and exhilarating experience and I will miss that day to day buzz but I feel now is the right time to focus on other areas.”

Chris Shaw, Senior Programme Controller at Five, and a former Editor of Five News, who brought Kirsty Young to the channel in 1997, said: “Kirsty was the Face of Five News when it launched and she defined a new style of news presentation. Obviously we’re sorry she is leaving but understand that she wants a change and everyone at the channel wishes her the very best.”

Lisa Opie, Five’s Managing Director, Content, added: “Kirsty has played a key role in the success of Five News and I hope we will still see her appearing on the channel from time to time in the years ahead.”

Kirsty Young caught the public’s attention when she perched rather than sat behind a desk to read the first ever news bulletin on Five News.

Her pioneering informal style helped Five News win several awards in its first year. Kirsty briefly left Five in 1999 to join ITV News before returning to the channel in 2002.

In addition to the news she also presented several high profile programmes for Five including, most recently, a debate featuring the next Prime Minister, Gordon Brown, and an audience of ten year-olds.

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