Garrow’s Law

9:00pm Sunday 4 December on BBC ONE

A vicious riot erupts on polling day in the Westminster constituency. As the crowd parts, an old man lies on the ground, brutally clubbed to death. A black man, Nicholson, stands on trial for murder.

Garrow is distraught because Sarah has left him. Southouse’s assiduous young nephew, George Pinnock, brings him news of the case and manages to coax him back to life.

When it is revealed in court that Nicholson is completely innocent, and the evidence against him a feeble fabrication by a newly created police force, Garrow is galvanised into action. What is the purpose of the cover-up? Garrow and George begin to unearth vote-rigging, state brutality and abuse of power at the very highest levels.

But without Sarah, Garrow is incomplete. She has disappeared and has illegally taken Samuel with her. Sir Arthur Hill is furious and vengeful. Garrow must somehow untie the destructive knot that binds all three of them together in anger and recrimination. Will he succeed? And at what cost to all three of them?

Nicholson is played by Nyasha Hatendi, William Garrow by Andrew Buchan, George Pinnock by Harry Melling, Lady Sarah Hill by Lyndsey Marshal and Sir Arthur Hill by Rupert Graves.

9:00pm Sunday 27 November on BBC ONE

General Thomas Picton, Governor of Trinidad, is in the dock accused of the brutal torture of a16-year-old mixed heritage woman. In prosecuting the case, Garrow sees the potential to expose not only the man, but also the colonial system that makes many an Englishman rich.

Garrow is approached by his political nemesis, Lord Melville, who has a proposition. If Garrow agrees to limit the scope of his prosecution, Melville will use his considerable influence to persuade Hill to give Sarah back her son.

Garrow is confronted with an impossible choice; to expose British colonial brutality in open court or to re-unite his beloved Lady Sarah with her son.

Meanwhile, Sarah, supported by an ailing Southouse, faces her husband at the Court of Chancery, determined to advocate the rights of the mother as equal to those of the father.

During the Picton trial, a now gravely ill Southouse collapses, exhorting that Garrow “let justice be done though the heavens fall”.

What will be the outcome for Sarah? Will Garrow be forced to follow his head or his heart?

General Thomas Picton is played by Patrick Baladi, William Garrow by Andrew Buchan, Lord Melville by Stephen Boxer, Lady Sarah Hill by Lyndsey Marshal and John Southouse by Alun Armstrong.

9:00pm Sunday 20 November on BBC ONE

Spitalfield silk-weavers, Quinn and Foley, are accused of feloniously destroying silk looms in an act of industrial sabotage, as Garrow’s Law continues. However, their defence is perilously thin and the evidence is strongly against them.

A bored and disillusioned Garrow is looking for a case that will challenge and engage his restless mind and he must persuade a sceptical jury of their innocence.When one of the defendants turns Kings Evidence against his friend, love and loyalty compete with fear and death in the 18th-century courthouse. Garrow is conflicted – are his clients innocent or guilty? And do they deserve the noose?

Meanwhile, John Southouse is furious. He regards Lady Sarah’s attempt to get custody of Samuel as misguided, futile and ruinous. The creditors are at Garrow’s door and Southouse believes Sarah’s obsession with Samuel is an indulgent distraction. But Southouse’s own life is about to be turned upside down when he is diagnosed with Typhus (“gaol-fever”) and his prognosis is uncertain.

William Garrow is played by Andrew Buchan, Ciaran Quinn by Ruaidhri Conroy, Cathal Foley by Hugh O’Conor, Lady Sarah Hill by Lyndsey Marshal and John Southouse by Alun Armstrong.

9:00pm Sunday 13 November on BBC ONE

William Garrow attempts to change British law forever in the opening episode of Garrow’s Law, written and co-created by Tony Marchant and based on a true story. Garrow returns to the Bailey risking his reputation to defend James Hadfield, who is on trial for High Treason for attempting to assassinate King George III.

Garrow agrees to meet Hadfield at Newgate, but finds his defence perplexing. Hadfield is convinced that God has spoken to him. He insists that he did not want to kill the King, but rather wanted himself to be killed by an outraged patriotic crowd. Is he a madman or an assassin? Eighteenth century law does not permit a man to be mad sometimes.

Convinced of Hadfield’s insanity, Garrow risks a defence which seeks to change the law. But in a country where the King himself seems completely lunatic sometimes, is it a defence which threatens the Establishment, or is it an assault on George III himself?

Now living in an ‘irregular’ relationship with Lady Sarah Hill, Garrow finds himself ostracised and impoverished. He must deal with the competing demands of domestic happiness and professional integrity.

Meanwhile, separated from her husband, Sir Arthur Hill, Southouse informs Sarah that she has no independent rights of her own. She is determined to be reunited with her son and commits a desperate act to try to get him back. But is it an act that provokes her estranged husband? What will be the implications for her and Garrow?

William Garrow is played by Andrew Buchan, James Hadfield by Mark Letheren, Lady Sarah Hill by Lyndsey Marshal, Sir Arthur Hill by Rupert Graves and John Southouse by Alun Armstrong.

William Garrow is played by Andrew Buchan, James Hadfield by Mark Letheren, Lady Sarah Hill by Lyndsey Marshal, Sir Arthur Hill by Rupert Graves and John Southouse by Alun Armstrong.

Can you give a hint at what there is to look forward to in the new series?

The cases are fascinating. They are written very honestly and accurately, and are, dramatically speaking, very challenging to perform. They’re also very powerful in the sense that each case resonates today. The first one looks at madness and how it was defined in legal terms in that day and age. The third case looks at the case of General Picton, Governor of Trinidad, who devised specific methods of torture, almost as a sport, for his own general amusement and entertainment. There was a sickening brutality to all of his methods, and he was eventually brought to trial for them. All of the cases have been shocking and captivating and we’ve been very spoilt with the guest actors we’ve had. They really bring the cases to life.

 

What challenges do you and Lady Sarah face as a couple?

Enormous challenges at work to get his reputation back, to put food on the table, to keep a home. And whilst he’s in court, Sarah enters into a custody battle with Sir Arthur to win Samuel back, without Garrow’s knowledge. Alongside the huge emotional tug of war, neither of them can afford the legal costs. Now that you are a couple, are there some intimate scenes in the new series? Yes! They are together now, and they do the things that couples do; be it laughing, crying, household chores, or a bit of how’s your Father!

 

What was it like filming those love scenes together?

Love scenes at the best of times can be pretty damn strange because there are about fifteen random people in the room watching you, so it’s usually the most un-sexual thing you can do. Lyndsey is a friend so it was slightly strange, but at the same time we trusted each other. And luckily the director handled the whole thing with a great deal of sensitivity.

 

Were you in the gym every night in preparation?

(Laughs!) Oh…you know… just working on my lats and my delts, redefining my quads. No, there was not much time for all of that, but I did go swimming whenever I could. 

 

What is it like filming with Alun Armstrong? Is he a lot of fun?

With Alun, there is a small joker of a boy running around inside a 66 year old’s body! He’s relentless with his wit and he’s just fantastic to be around, both on set and off. He’s a true revelation. He’s a superb actor, and is just brilliant at bringing perspective.

 

What is your costume like this year?

It’s the same costume – Garrow certainly can’t afford anything different because he’s hard up. But I think Silvester (Aidan McArdle) has stepped up his game – he’s enjoying a little promotion maybe. It is good actually because I’ve only just come to terms with how to fasten everything. Any new clothes and I’d have to consult the dressing manual all over again.

 

Do you get recognised as “someone from the telly”?

On and off, it depends what my hair’s doing that day. If it’s got post shampoo slump, then not a chance! I just look like someone from a grunge band. But when people do come up to me, they very rarely get the name of the programme right. It’s usually Gallow’s Law or Garrisons or ‘that lawyer thing’. It’s now become a bit of a cast joke. The best example happened quite recently when a lady came up to me at a wedding, and said “This one is an actor. This one is on a legal programme…Grey’s Anatomy!!”

 

Your co-stars in Party Animals have gone on to find amazing success. Are you still in touch?

Yes – sporadically. They’re all class. A fantastic, talented bunch of people – you’d only ever wish them all a great deal of success. They’ve all gone into very different arenas; with Andrea (Riseborough) doing films and then Matt (Smith) in Doctor Who and Shelley (Conn) now doing Spielberg – all very different and very challenging pieces of work. Superb.

9.00pm Sunday 14 November on BBC ONE

Andrew Buchan returns to the Old Bailey as the pioneering 18th-century barrister along with Alun Armstrong as his friend and mentor, Southouse

A stellar cast, lead by Andrew Buchan (Cranford, Party Animals), Alun Armstrong (New Tricks, Little Dorrit), Lyndsey Marshal (Being Human, Rome), Aidan McArdle (Beautiful People, Jane Eyre) and Rupert Graves (Wallander, God On Trial), return for a second series of BBC One’s acclaimed legal drama Garrow’s Law, which recently started shooting in Scotland.

A Twenty Twenty / Shed Media Scotland production through BBC Scotland, the four-part factual drama is inspired by the life of pioneering barrister William Garrow (Buchan). RTS award-winning Garrow’s Law revisits the Old Bailey of Georgian London and is set against a backdrop of corruption and social injustice, based on real legal cases from the late-18th century.

In an age where the defence counsel acted in the minority of cases, the young William Garrow championed the underdog and pioneered the rigorous cross-examination of prosecution witnesses that paved the way for our modern legal system today.

Dominic Barlow, executive producer, Twenty Twenty / Shed Media Scotland, says: “We are delighted to be bringing Garrow’s Law back to BBC One. This series will not only see Garrow fighting legal and political injustice in the Old Bailey but also injustice in his personal life that could end his career at the Bar.”

Mark Bell, Commissioning Editor, Arts, adds: “Tony Marchant and the team at Twenty Twenty did a great job in bringing William Garrow from the shadows of British legal history to a broad audience on BBC One. Round Two of his trials and tribulations will see him continue to fight for love and justice through more shocking and amazing cases of the time.”

Co-created by Tony Marchant (The Knight’s Tale, Mark Of Cain, Crime & Punishment), Garrow’s Law, series two is produced by Nick Pitt (Robin Hood, Silent Witness) and directed by Ashley Pearce (Poirot, The Commander). Executive producers are Dominic Barlow and Tim Carter for Twenty Twenty / Shed, Gaynor Holmes for BBC Scotland Drama and Mark Bell, Commissioning Editor, BBC Arts & Knowledge.

Garrow’s Law series two was commissioned Jay Hunt, Controller, BBC One, and Mark Bell, Commissioning Editor, Arts.

The second series starts shooting at the end of June until mid-August at BBC Scotland’s Dumbarton studios. It will broadcast later in 2010.

Garrow’s Law continues in the footsteps of distinctive programming made recently through BBC Scotland including Single Father (BBC One), The Deep (BBC One), Lip Service (BBC Three), One Night In Emergency (BBC One Scotland), River City (BBC One Scotland), Waterloo Road (BBC One) and Wallander (BBC One).

 

In the late 18th century, a young, idealistic barrister, William Garrow, is given his first criminal defence case at the Old Bailey by attorney and mentor, John Southouse.

The case is brought by Mary Pace who needs a barrister to defend her innocent brother, Peter. He finds himself falsely accused by the renowned thief-taker, Forrester, of robbing a man at gunpoint.

At the Old Bailey, Garrow meets the prosecuting barrister, Oxford-educated Silvester, who quickly becomes Garrow’s nemesis. An over-confident Garrow is outwitted in court by Silvester and Forrester humiliates Garrow when questioned by him. Silvester wins the case and the infamously harsh Judge Buller sentences Peter Pace to death.

Garrow is devastated but his performance nonetheless catches the eye of Lady Sarah Hill who is in court taking notes for her husband, the politician Sir Arthur Hill.

Garrow is invited to dinner at Sir Arthur and Lady Sarah’s home but the dinner party does not go well. The talk around the table of crime and punishment offends Garrow’s sense of justice and he leaves in disgust.

Lady Sarah Hill takes notes at a magistrate’s hearing of a young maidservant, Elizabeth Jarvis, who is accused of murdering her newborn baby. Her mistress, Mrs Tarling, discovered her condition and the case is brought before Judge Buller at the Old Bailey.

Lady Sarah goes to Southouse and insists that Garrow defends Elizabeth and that she will pay for the defence. Southouse has no choice but to instruct Garrow and they go to visit Elizabeth at Newgate Prison.

In court, Garrow is this time well-prepared having visited an obstetrician with a queasy Southouse and gathered vital medical evidence. He discredits the evidence of the prosecution witnesses – Mrs Tarling and a surgeon, William Herring – and advises Elizabeth to defend herself to the jury as law dictates he is not allowed to do so.

His method of defence works and the jury find Elizabeth not guilty. She is released.

A jubilant Garrow vows to change the law and bring justice to the defenceless and he tells Southouse that he hopes the support of Lady Sarah will help him do so. Southouse does not approve.

Future episodes will appear on BBC Network Programme Information

Fighting For Justice… The 18th century legal world comes to life in new four-part drama on BBC One, inspired by the life of the pioneering barrister William Garrow, starring Andrew Buchan (Cranford, The Fixer), Alun Armstrong (New Tricks, Little Dorrit), Lyndsey Marshal (Rome) and Aidan McArdle (The Duchess, Beautiful People).

Co-created by Tony Marchant (The Knight’s Tale, Holding On, Crime And Punishment), Garrow’s Law is set in the Old Bailey of Georgian London against a backdrop of corruption and social injustice and is based on real cases from the late 18th century.

Each one-hour episode begins with the investigation of a case sourced from the Old Bailey archives, from rape and murder to high treason and corruption, and follows Garrow (Buchan) and his associate Southouse (Armstrong) working to uncover the truth or fight for justice.

In an age where the defence counsel acted in the minority of cases the young Garrow championed the underdog and pioneered the rigorous cross-examination of prosecution that paved the way for our modern legal system of today.

“A gifted maverick, at times arrogant and with a burning sense of destiny, Garrow is driven to change the nature of the trial against a backdrop of social and political upheaval,” says Jamie Isaacs, Executive Producer, Twenty Twenty Television.

Garrow’s Law is a Twenty Twenty/Shed Media Scotland production for BBC One. The series was commissioned by Mark Bell, the BBC’s Commissioning Editor for Arts, for BBC Knowledge.

Andrew Buchan (Cranford, Party Animals), Alun Armstrong (New Tricks, Little Dorrit) and Lyndsey Marshall (Rome) star in a new four-part legal drama inspired by the life of pioneering barrister William Garrow on BBC One.

Garrow’s Law is set in the Old Bailey of Georgian London against a backdrop of corruption and social injustice and is based on real legal cases from the late 18th century.

Each one-hour episode begins with the investigation of a case sourced from the Old Bailey archives from the day, from rape and murder to high treason and corruption, and follows Garrow (Buchan) and his associate Southouse (Armstrong) working to uncover the truth or fight for justice.

In an age where the defence counsel acted in the minority of cases, the young Garrow championed the underdog and pioneered the rigorous cross-examination of prosecution witnesses that paved the way for our modern legal system of today.

“A gifted maverick, at times arrogant and with a burning sense of destiny, Garrow is driven to change the nature of the trial against a backdrop of social and political upheaval,” says Jamie Isaacs, Executive Producer, Twenty Twenty Television.

Co-created by Tony Marchant (The Knight’s Tale, Holding On, Crime And Punishment), Garrow’s Law is a Twenty Twenty/Shed Media Scotland production for BBC One.

The series was commissioned by Mark Bell, the BBC’s Commissioning Editor for Arts, for BBC Knowledge.

Mark Bell says: “It is a great privilege to be bringing history to life for BBC One in this way. Garrow made the law as we know it.

“His is a thrilling and dramatic story, brilliantly re-imagined in this script.”

Jay Hunt, Controller, BBC One, says: “It’s a fantastic collaboration between factual and drama to create an immersive history piece which should also feel like a period drama.”

Filming begins this summer in Scotland and Garrow’s Law will be broadcast on BBC One later this year.

BBC Knowledge has a long tradition of making well-received factual-based dramas such as the recent Best: His Mother’s Son, Casualty 1907 and Maxwell.

www.bbc.co.uk/tv/comingup/garrowslaw

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