House

Despite all the trouble Charlie Sheen has been in recently, he still has one thing going for him: he earns more that anyone else on TV.

The Two and a Half Men star has been named the highest-earning TV star, finishing ahead of the likes of House actor Hugh Laurie and American Idol host Ryan Seacrest.

Sheen pulls a whopping $1.25m per episode of the sitcom, which he recently resigned on to for more seasons. Why wouldn’t you?

His co-star Jon Cryer earns a mild $550,000 for the same amount of work- coming in at second place on the list.

Hugh Laurie is the highest-paid drama actor, earning over $400,000 per episode of House, with Law & Order: SVU actors Christopher Meloni and Mariska Hargitay tied at second on $395,000.

Comedy stars Tina Fey pulls $350,000 per episode for 30 Rock while The Office boss Steve Carell’s pay cheque reads $297,000 per outing.

Source: Digital Spy

The House team will be without series regular Olivia Wilde for the majority of next season.

The 26-year-old actress, who plays Dr. “Thirteen” Hadley, will depart the hit series in order to shoot Iron Man director Jon Favreau’s new big-budget flick Cowboys & Aliens.

“She had this opportunity and she was really excited about it,” says House executive producer Katie Jacobs. “We’re very proud of her and very happy for her.”

“Olivia will be there at the very beginning of the season, and then she will not be there for a period of time.”

“The two things — the dates that she was going to be away and the story line [we wanted to tell] — worked out,” Jacobs adds. “When the story unfolds, it will [all make] sense.”

The production of the movie will overlap with that of House for at least two months and during this time her departure from the show is being disguised as a “leave of absence” for Wilde’s character.

Source: EW

 

Arriving on Sky1 HD earlier this year, HOUSE has cemented itself as a firm favourite with the channel’s viewers. Packed full of sarcastic witticisms from the eponymous grouchy yet genius medic, season five saw Dr Gregory House (Laurie) continue to unravel the most unusual of medical complaints (ruling out lupus each time); but a turning point came when team member Lawrence Kutner (Kal Penn) took his own life. As House struggled with his feelings about the suicide, his addiction to pain medication began to spiral out of control. Soon he was hallucinating about conversations with the deceased Amber (Anne Dudek) and as the series built to its finale a drug induced episode led House to hallucinate he had a passionate sexual encounter with love interest and sparring partner Dr Lisa Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein). As the season concluded, Wilson (Robert Sean Leonard) took House to a psychiatric institution.

Moving away from Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital, season six begins with a two-hour episode based in Mayfield Psychiatric Hospital where the doctor is now the patient. “The beginning of the season is primarily focussed on House trying to find some semblance of sanity” says executive producer David Shore, “and he isn’t necessarily succeeding.” Events in the premiere episode take place over a two or three month period and Emmy® winner Andre Braugher is confirmed to guest star as House’s doctor.

As the season progresses, House’s transition back to normal life is far from easy. As the diagnostician moves in with Wilson on his release from hospital and begins his efforts to reclaim his medical licence, the relationship between House and his best friend is explored. And although taking a back seat in the series, according to Shore, House and Cuddy’s relationship will continue to spark. After all, as Wilson pointed out, House’s hallucination of sex with Cuddy was the reality he wants to exist.

Elsewhere, Foreman (Omar Epps) takes control of the diagnostics department in House’s absence, leading to tensions between himself and Thirteen (Olivia Wilde), while the newly married Cameron (Jennifer Morrison) and Chase (Jesse Spencer) return to more prominent roles in the team.

The voice of Darth Vader, James Earl Jones, will guest star later in the series as an African dictator who becomes a patient at the hospital.

Accompanying the brand new series of HOUSE will be an exclusive behind the scenes special filmed on location for Sky1 HD. HOUSE: ACCESS ALL AREAS (Working Title) will journey to Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital to see just what happens on the set of the world’s most watched TV show. With exclusive interviews with all the key cast and crew including Hugh Laurie and David Shore, plus a behind the scenes set tour from Dr Cuddy (Edelstein) HOUSE: ACCESS ALL AREAS will allow fans to get as close to the show as humanly possible in never seen before detail.

Executive produced by David Shore, Katie Jacobs and The Usual Suspects director Bryan Singer, HOUSE was the most watched television show in the world in 2008. With three technical advisors working on the show – led by Lisa Sanders an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the Yale School of Medicine – the show’s medical credentials certainly stack up. In 2005, Laurie appeared on the cover of US Magazine TV Guide as “TV’s Sexiest Man” and, in 2008; House was voted the second sexiest television doctor ever, behind ER’s Doug Ross (George Clooney). The series also bares strong links with criminal detective Sherlock Holmes, and not just in House’s indifference to patients and addiction to drugs; his apartment number is 221B.

Brand new House, Sundays at 9pm from the 4th October on Sky1 HD.

With baffling medical mysteries, sarcasm and fashionable yet suggesting trouble stubble, the Emmy®, Screen Actors Guild®, Golden Globe® and Peabody® award- winning House, starring Hugh Laurie returns to Sky1 HD this October.

House has cemented itself as a firm favourite with TV viewers, becoming more than the cult classic many (ie Me) thought it would initially be.

Rammed full of sarcastic witticisms from the eponymous crank, season five saw Dr Gregory House continue to unravel the most unusual of medical complaints (ruling out lupus each time); but a turning point came when team member Lawrence Kutner (Kal Penn) took his own life.

As House struggled with his feelings about the suicide, his addiction to pain medication began to spiral out of control. Soon he was hallucinating about conversations with the deceased Amber (Anne Dudek) and as the series built to its finale a drug induced episode led House to hallucinate he had a passionate sexual encounter with love interest and sparring partner Dr Lisa Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein).

Yowzer.

As the season concluded, Wilson (Robert Sean Leonard) took House to a psychiatric institution. Moving away from Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital, season six begins with a two-hour episode based in Mayfield Psychiatric Hospital where the doctor is now the patient.

“The beginning of the season is primarily focussed on House trying to find some semblance of sanity” says executive producer David Shore, “and he isn’t necessarily succeeding.”

Sounds rather exciting doesn’t it? Brand new House is on Sundays at 9pm from the 4th October on Sky1 HD.

Golden Globe® and Screen Actors Guild winner Hugh Laurie returns to UK screens as Dr Gregory House in the medical whodunnit HOUSE this summer with brand new episodes airing on Sky1 and Sky1 HD from Sunday 31 May, 2009.

Golden Globe® and Screen Actors Guild winner Hugh Laurie returns to UK screens as Dr Gregory House in the medical whodunnit HOUSE this summer with brand new episodes airing on Sky1 and Sky1 HD from Sunday 31 May, 2009.

HOUSE is a doctor devoid of bedside manner, whose behaviour often borders on antisocial, but he’s a brilliant diagnostician whose unconventional thinking and flawless instincts afford him a great deal of respect from his peers. An infectious disease specialist, he thrives on the challenge of solving medical puzzles in order to save lives.

As the fifth season begins, HOUSE’s guilt and Wilson’s (Robert Sean Leonard) grief over the death of Wilson’s girlfriend Amber sends ripples through Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital. Wilson, still in mourning, wants nothing to do with HOUSE given his tangential role in her death. As a result, HOUSE, desperate to win back his only real friend, looks to his colleagues from his diagnostic team including plastic surgeon Dr Chris Taub (Peter Jacobson); the enigmatic Dr Remy Hadley (Olivia Wilde) and enthusiastic radical Dr Lawrence Kutner (Kal Penn) .

Hugh Laurie commented: “What we’re seeing this season is how vulnerable HOUSE really is. I think it’s fascinating to watch HOUSE pursue Wilson. He needs him, and I suppose he’s revealed himself more than ever this year because he’s so needy. Despite HOUSE’s vaunted independence and grumbled disdain for humanity, we’re seeing that he’s a man with real human emotion.”

But what does this mean for our curmudgeonly anti-hero? Will recent events have a lasting impact or will HOUSE return to his old self? Leonard commented: “Certainly Amber’s death has changed things between them and will continue to affect that relationship…he [HOUSE] doesn’t want Wilson to hate him. To me that’s the most naked HOUSE has been in five years.”

Laurie adds: “HOUSE needs Wilson for…vanity. He needs someone to laugh at his jokes. HOUSE needs an audience as much as he needs patients for his clinical skills…the jokes aren’t simple comic relief. They’re quite profound. HOUSE’s ability to find humour in the absurd, whether it’s during an influenza outbreak, let’s say, or in the privacy of his own mind, helps HOUSE cope with the daily traffic of human misery that runs through the hospital.”

And find humour he does, albeit of the acerbic, bitter and twisted nature we’ve come to expect from the Vicodin addicted, misanthropic medical genius, professing such classic HOUSE-isms in the season opener, Dying Changes Everything, as: “My patient’s still fighting in the feminist trenches, but the war is over. Yesterday’s sluts are today’s empowered women, today’s sluts are celebrities — if that isn’t progress.”

HOUSE also stars Lisa Edelstein as Dr Lisa Cuddy, the Dean of Medicine and Hospital Administrator, with whom HOUSE maintains a somewhat volatile relationship – the two are engaged in constant conflict over HOUSE’s duties and unconventional behaviour, though even she would admit that his brilliance is more-often-than-not worth the trouble; Omar Epps as Neurologist Dr Eric Foreman who serves as Cuddy’s eyes and ears on HOUSE; Jennifer Morrison as Immunologist and Head of Emergency Medicine, Dr. Allison Cameron; and Jesse Spencer as Surgeon, Dr. Robert Chase.

In Season 5, as well as celebrating the shows milestone 100th episode, we’ll witness Cuddy fulfilling her dream of motherhood after adopting an infant girl and Foreman starting a relationship with Dr. ‘Thirteen’ Hadley, who continues to battle the deadly Huntington’s disease, plus the creators will further explore HOUSE and Cuddy’s relationship to determine exactly what type of relationship they share — if any. Fans have been buzzing about the “Huddy” hook-up for some time, with the chemistry between the two palpable. Lisa Edelstein commented: “I don’t necessarily think it will ever be a satisfying relationship in terms of both of them kind of settling in and saying this is what we’re doing. But she has a complicated relationship with men…She likes the screwed up ones…It’s a beautiful, complicated adult relationship between those two characters.”

HOUSE Season 5 launches with a double-bill on Sunday 31 May, 2009 on Sky1 and Sky1 HD.

Sky1 has signed a deal with NBC Universal International Television Distribution to secure the first run TV rights in the UK to the hit medical drama series House, it was announced today. House will continue its second run in the UK on Hallmark, where it has been airing since 2005.

Starring Hugh Laurie as Dr Gregory House, the series has won the hearts of viewers and critics alike and has been honoured on numerous occasions with awards including three Emmys, two Golden Globes and two Screen Actors Guild Awards. Sky1 has acquired the series as it enters its fifth season in the UK and reaches the milestone 100th episode.

House, an innovative take on the medical drama, solves mysteries where the villain is a medical malady and the hero is an irreverent, controversial doctor who trusts no one, least of all his patients.

BSkyB’s Sophie Turner Laing, Managing Director, Entertainment said: “I’m delighted to be bringing House to Sky1.  The series has long entertained fans with its highly original take on a medical procedural drama and wry humour.  Consistently excellent with a wonderful cast, House is the perfect addition to the channel that delivers the very best US drama to our customers.”

House is from Heel and Toe Films, Shore Z Productions and Bad Hat Harry Productions in association with Universal Media Studios. Katie Jacobs, David Shore, Paul Attanasio, Bryan Singer, Russel Friend, Garrett Lerner and Thomas L. Moran are executive producers.  House is distributed internationally by NBC Universal International Television Distribution.

(16/16)

Hugh Laurie stars as brilliant but caustic New Jersey medic Dr Gregory House in the fourth series of the Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning medical drama. In the season finale, House and his team struggle to save Amber’s life following the bus crash. As problems in her heart begin to affect her other major organs, House agrees to Wilson’s request to cool Amber’s body in order to buy time for a diagnosis.

Following the revelation that Amber was involved in the bus crash that left House with partial amnesia (see last week’s episode, ‘House’s Head’), the doctors race against time to save her life. Wilson and House rush to Amber’s bedside where they discover that, having been found without identification, she has been treated as a ‘Jane Doe’. Despite losing her kidneys in the accident, Amber emerged from surgery in a stable condition – only for her heart to begin racing out of control. “Whatever’s doing this to her heart, it isn’t from the crash,” her doctor says.

House is convinced that he recognised a symptom in Amber prior to the crash, but cannot remember what it is. He persuades Amber’s doctor to transfer her to Princeton Plainsboro Hospital, but she suffers a cardiac arrest in the ambulance. House is about to shock her back to life when Wilson stops him by claiming the defibrillation could result in brain damage. He begs House to put her into “protective hypothermia” by cooling her body, thus slowing the progress of the illness and buying them time to diagnose her. “This is not a solution. All you’re doing is pressing pause,” House warns him, before agreeing to the procedure.

At the hospital, Amber is transferred to intensive care where her body temperature is gradually lowered. The team runs a differential diagnosis and Kutner and 13 are sent to search her apartment for clues. House, meanwhile, struggles to recall the events prior to the crash. He knows that he met Amber in a bar, but cannot remember why. Is it possible that he had romantic designs on his best friend’s girl?

The discovery that Amber was taking diet pills prompts House to wonder if they are behind her illness. But this theory is ruled out when Chase notices that Amber is jaundiced – indicating her liver is failing. “Liver failure means whatever this thing is, it’s spreading despite the fact that she’s frozen,” Foreman says. Against his better judgment – and that of his team – House agrees to Wilson’s demand that they lower Amber’s temperature even further. He then comes up with a new idea when he finds a rash on the small of her back – but once again gives in to Wilson’s wishes and delays warming her up until the diagnosis is confirmed.

Convinced that House is letting his friendship with Wilson cloud his judgment, Foreman takes matters into his own hands and goes to see Cuddy. “House is going to kill the patient,” he says. Cuddy agrees and the pair begin to bring Amber out of her semi-frozen state, until they notice that her brain waves are slowing down. “Well done!” declares a furious Wilson. “We still don’t know what it is, but you’ve just let it spread to the brain.”

With Amber’s symptoms now affecting her heart, liver and brain, House seems no closer to a solution. Wilson then hits him with an extraordinary request – he wants him to undergo “deep brain stimulation” to jog his memory in the hope of remembering the symptom that he saw. This involves sending electrical jolts through the brain – but having just survived a bus crash and a heart attack in rapid succession, House is in no shape for such a procedure. “You think I should risk my life to save Amber’s?” he asks Wilson. House agrees to do what he can to help his friend – but can he find the clue he needs to save Amber’s life?

Hugh Laurie stars as brilliant but caustic New Jersey medic Dr Gregory House in the fourth series of the Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning medical drama. This week, in the first part of the season finale, House suffers short-term memory loss after being involved in a serious bus crash. While his colleagues urge him to rest, House is plagued by the belief that someone on the bus needs his help.

“I don’t know how I got here,” says House. Sitting in the corner of a lap-dancing club, the dazed doctor realises he cannot recall the last four hours of his life. He diagnoses himself with concussion and discovers that he is bleeding from a gash on his head. But even more troubling is his conviction that somebody needs his help. “Someone is going to die unless I find them,” he says.

Stumbling into the street, House is confronted with the scene of a terrible bus accident. The vehicle is lying on its side while paramedics swarm to help the victims. Some 30 passengers were injured in the crash and most of them have been taken to Princeton-Plainsboro Hospital. At the ER, House is checked over by Cameron, who insists he go home to rest. But House is convinced that, prior to the crash, he saw one of the passengers exhibit signs of an illness. Who was it?

In order to kick-start his memory, House allows Chase to hypnotise him. He enters a dreamlike state and retraces his movements before the accident. He sees himself getting drunk in a bar with Amber – which may or may not be a figment of his imagination. The bartender takes the keys to House’s motorbike as he is not fit to drive, which explains how he ended up on the bus.

However, House is no closer to identifying the person in need of his help until, in the ER, the driver of the bus suddenly collapses with paralysis in his legs. House’s team runs a differential diagnosis on the driver while House explores other means of jogging his memory. He uses smell to trigger his recollection, before immersing himself in a sensory deprivation tank. Each attempt gives rise to a new set of hallucinatory scenes – all featuring a mysterious, attractive woman whose significance to the case is unclear. “I’m the answer,” she tells House.

Before House can probe deeper, he is dragged out of the tank by his colleagues and collapses. Scans show the fracture in his head has worsened and he is ordered to stay at home – with a nurse and security guard for company. However, with the bus driver’s condition deteriorating, Cuddy soon has no choice but to recall him.

Back at the hospital, House hits on the idea that the driver has an air bubble in his bloodstream. He theorises that the bubble was dislodged while he was driving and caused him to jerk the steering wheel – thus leading to the accident. The solution is to stick a needle in his heart and remove it – but Cuddy refuses her consent. House promptly barricades himself and 13 in the patient’s room and orders his horrified subordinate to perform the procedure. “Shut up and make a decision!” he tells 13. “Keep standing there, he’s dead either way!”

House is vindicated when 13 successfully removes the bubble and cures the driver. House returns home to sleep, only to be disturbed by another dream about the accident. “It’s not over,” he tells Cuddy. “I saved the wrong person.” House now speculates that the driver’s condition, rather than being the cause of the crash, was in fact a result of it –which means there was somebody else on the bus who caught his attention. “I need to get back on that bus with all 31 passengers to remember who and what I saw,” he declares.

House recreates the scene onboard another bus with hospital staff taking the place of the passengers. Fired up on Alzheimer’s pills to help break through his amnesia, he finally decodes the mystery woman’s message and relives the crash, leading to a heart-stopping revelation…

(14/16)

Hugh Laurie stars as brilliant but caustic New Jersey medic Dr Gregory House in the fourth series of the Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning medical drama. This week, House kidnaps the lead actor from his favourite soap opera in the belief that he has a brain tumour. Tests appear to disprove House’s theory, until the patient develops new symptoms that defy explanation.

Evan Greer (Jason Lewis, ‘Sex and the City’), the handsome star of a daytime soap opera, is stunned when he climbs into a waiting limo and is kidnapped by the chauffeur. The driver claims the actor has a brain tumour and needs urgent treatment. A bewildered Evan realises that his abductor has tried to contact him before. “You’re the nutjob doctor that keeps calling my publicists!” he says. “Actually,” replies House, “I’m the nutjob head of diagnostic medicine.”

Once at the hospital, House persuades Evan to undergo a test to confirm his theory. House explains that, whilst watching the soap, he noticed Evan displaying signs of a loss in peripheral vision that could be due to a tumour. However, Evan’s test is negative, and House’s attempts to keep him in the hospital under false pretences are exposed by Foreman. A furious Evan makes to leave, only to be sedated by House in a lift and taken for an MRI.

House’s shenanigans in keeping Evan against his will are particularly ill-timed this week, as the hospital is undergoing an inspection. In a desperate bid to keep her star doctor under control, Cuddy asks Cameron and Foreman to keep a close eye on him. At the same time, she begs House to tone down his excessive behaviour. House, however, is more concerned by the news that the MRI shows Evan is healthy. “See if you can talk him out of suing me,” he asks his team.

Evan is about to check out when he suddenly collapses in the lobby, suggesting that House was right all along. Tests confirm that the numbness in his foot is indeed the symptom of something more serious and the team begins a differential diagnosis. House visits Evan’s dressing room for clues about his lifestyle and, after talking with his co-star, returns with the news that the actor may be impotent. However, before he can establish whether this is another symptom of Evan’s condition, the actor almost suffers a heart attack.

Cameron now suggests Evan may have an autoimmune condition, which could be fixed by zapping his thyroid gland with radiation. House is keen to launch straight into the treatment, but Foreman disobeys his orders and runs a test to confirm the diagnosis first. Foreman’s prudence proves to be wise as the test proves negative, and instead reveals that Evan’s kidneys are failing. Matters are further complicated when Evan develops a fever and slips into a coma.

House is now convinced that Evan’s condition is due to a severe allergic reaction, while Foreman believes he has an infection. Unfortunately, they do not have time to confirm the diagnosis – and know the wrong treatment will kill him. House overrules everybody and prepares to administer Evan with a massive dose of steroids – enough to “jump start a car”, in the words of the pharmacist.

Cuddy arrives in time to beg House to wait for a confirmation of the diagnosis, reminding him that his actions – under the nose of the inspector – could get her fired. “If you think I’m wrong, tell me I’m wrong,” House snarls back. He has been wrong throughout this whole case – are his instincts correct now?

Also this week, Wilson and Amber probe the balance of power in their relationship as they make the vital purchase of a new bed. And Cameron finds herself back working for House as she is charged with the onerous task of completing his filing. Her willingness to submit to the chore prompts House to challenge her: “You miss me,” he declares. Is Cameron regretting her decision to leave the team?

Hugh Laurie stars as brilliant New Jersey medic Dr Gregory House in the fourth series of the Emmyand Golden Globe-winning medical drama. This week, the team tackles the unusual case of a patient who is just too nice. Is there a medical reason for his sickly sweet personality, or is it possible that he is just naturally kind-spirited?

Mild-mannered Jeff is brought into the hospital presenting with fainting spells and dysgeusia, a condition that affects the sense of taste. Jeff is married to one of the nurses at the hospital and is widely known by all to be a particularly agreeable guy. When House tests Jeff with his usual jibes, he fails to raise the patient’s ire and becomes immediately suspicious. House lists Jeff’s niceness as a symptom of his mystery illness, but Foreman refuses to accept this. “You want it to be a symptom because then we’re supposed to be jerks,” he observes, “which means you don’t even have to try to be nice.” But House insists he is right and orders a toxin investigation be carried out in Jeff’s home.

At Jeff’s house, Kutner discovers a bottle of hydrofluoric acid, which is known to cause fainting and affect the tastebuds. As Jeff cleans carpets for a living, he would have been exposed to high amounts of the chemical. However, House points out that there are problems with this theory. Hydrofluoric acid causes depleted calcium levels, but Jeff’s are normal. From this information, House concludes that Jeff’s calcium levels must have been elevated to start with. House diagnoses Williams syndrome, a condition that is linked to high levels of the mineral. To add weight to his verdict, House points out that another hallmark of Williams is that its sufferers are missing the ‘suspicion’ gene. “He’s nice in the sense that your toaster is nice for making you breakfast,” House explains. “It’s the only thing his wiring will let him do.”

While the doctors are debating the fact that Jeff does not display all of the syndrome’s characteristics, he suffers a stroke. It is now clear that there is something else wrong with the patient, and Kutner hits upon another possibility – he may have neurosyphilis. The tests come back positive, so Jeff is put on a course of penicillin. Initially it appears to be working – his personality is changing, which means the lesions on his brain caused by the syphilis are healing. Noting Jeff’s new-found aggression, House makes the dubious observation that “syphilis prevents domestic violence”.

But when Kutner sees the change in Jeff, a completely different idea dawns on him. Could House’s hostile temperament be related to syphilis, just as Jeff’s placid nature was? In the lab, he finds definitive proof that House does indeed have syphilis. It seems that House’s personality could be nothing more than the symptom of a disease. While the team grapples with this shocking relevation, Jeff’s health takes a turn for the worse as he goes into cardiac arrest. With no new theories to hand, it is back to the drawing board for House. Will he be forced to admit that perhaps people can be nice for no reason?

Also this week, House and Amber enter into a ‘custody battle’ when House claims that Wilson’s girlfriend is monopolising his best buddy’s time. After House wins a small victory by securing Wilson’s Wednesday nights, he attempts to get his friend drunk so he will not be of much use to Amber when he gets home. But Amber latches on to House’s games and introduces a penalty clause into their agreement. She has made it clear that she is not about to let House come between her and her man. As the two lock horns, could it be that Amber and House have met their match in each other?

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