Human Guinea Pigs

human guinea pigs (8/8)

Dan, Ollie, Nicky, Mike and Kirby are the Human Guinea Pigs – five best mates who take pleasure in performing outrageous stunts. In tonight’s season finale, the boys discover how hard it is to be women – and pregnant ones, at that. Kitted out with pregnant bellies, they attempt to endure hair removal, high heels and sleep deprivation.

Today the foolish fivesome find out what it takes for ladies to maintain their svelte appearances in an experiment entitled ‘To Wax or To Zap’. They are introduced to beauty therapist Doreen, who submits the intrepid idiots to a variety of hairremoval techniques.

First up is Mike, who is going to give electrolysis a go. Not a fan of needles, he is alarmed when he learns that this technique involves a needle sending a current into the hair root to damage it. “This isn’t science,” he whimpers afterwards. “This is just pure pain!” Next is Ollie, who tries out a rather less painful method: removal cream. This dissolves the proteins in the hair, making it easy to wash away. “Don’t you think he looks like Frankenstein’s bride?” laughs Mike when he sees Ollie minus one eyebrow. Finally, Nicky bravely steps up to try out waxing. How will he cope with the agonising procedure described by the professor as “utterly barbaric”?

The next challenge, ‘Heel Regret Wearing Them’, sees the boys step forward in the name of science to discover what ‘lady-shoes’ actually do to the wearer’s feet. High heels look great and are hence beloved by many women – and some men – but can wearing them do bad things to the body? To find out, the pigs each wear a pair of high heels for three days, during which they must walk andrun.

Soon enough, Kirby experiences one of the dangerous side-effects of wearing heels – twisting of the knees, which damages the cartilage around the joint and can lead to osteoarthritis, a condition much more common in women. Dan, meanwhile, is on what the professor calls “a fast-track to bunions” – where the big toe is forced inwards and a bony lump compensates by growing outwards. As well as causing tendon damage, posture problems and foot deformity, these shoes can also cause injury by provoking the simple act of falling over – as one of the pigs finds to his cost when the gang attempts a risky race.

Later, the daft boys find out what it is like to be deprived of sleep for 48 hours in ‘Can a Pig See Pigs Fly?’. With their pregnant bellies now replaced with baby dolls that cry, eat and need their nappies changing, the guys embark on their sleepless voyage of discovery. But what they do not know is that they are going to be monitored for hallucinations. As tempers fray, hysteria mounts and reaction times slow, will any of them start seeing things?

Also this week, one pig attempts a chillidrinking contest against a girl – with upsetting and messy results. When Nicky bows out after drinking five shots of the hot stuff, Dan steps up and drinks a terrifying half-pint cocktail of hot sauce. “It hurts to breathe,” he splutters afterwards, desperately attempting to neutralise the fiery capsaicin in the chillies with some yoghurt. And the boys attempt to demonstrate the difficulty faced by a sperm travelling to an egg –by encasing themselves in bubble-wrap and running around a dog track.

human guinea pigs (7/8)

Dan, Ollie, Nicky, Mike and Kirby are the Human Guinea Pigs – five best mates who take pleasure in performing outrageous stunts. Tonight, Dan demonstrates how a rocket is launched; there is a trip to an ice bar to learn about the effects of intense cold; and the pigs try to set a record for eating tripe.

Having grown up together and developed a shared fascination with hurting themselves, the Human Guinea Pigs are now putting their stupidity to good use to solve a range of scientific conundrums. They are assisted by Professor Stuart Milligan, who pushes them to their limits in the pursuit of knowledge. As the guinea pigs undergo various tests, the professor uses animation to explain what is happening to their bodies.

In tonight’s edition, Dan puts himself in the firing line in order to understand the forces involved in a rocket launch. The professor has devised a simulation involving small plastic film canisters, soluble pills and a sensitive area of Dan’s anatomy. The canisters are filled with warm water and the tablets are dropped inside. As the pills dissolve, they create a pressure inside the container. “This action continues until there is enough pressure to blow apart the canister from its lid,” the professor explains. “The reaction is the launch of the rocket.”

In short order, the canister is blasted with considerable force at its target: Dan’s groin. This proves the mechanics of Newton’s third law of motion – that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction – as well as demonstrating the unutterable depths of Dan’s stupidity.

Undeterred, Dan is soon back in action alongside the other pigs as they make a trip to an ice bar in London’s West End, where the room temperature is kept at a bracing –5 degrees. The aim of this excursion is to answer two questions: why does being in the cold provoke the desire to pee, and does body fat help keep you warm?

To test the effects of the cold on urine production, the five pigs must endure the freezing temperatures dressed only in their underwear and a cape, drinking fruit juice to fill their bladders. After 40 minutes, the pigs begin to drop out to answer calls of nature, until only Mike and Kirby are left standing.

The professor, meanwhile, explains the biology behind their overwhelming desire to urinate. The cold reduces blood flow to the skin, sending it into the centre of the body and thereby increasing blood pressure. “The body’s response is to try and reduce the pressure by getting your kidneys to get rid of water,” the professor says. “Therefore, cold makes you pee.”

Mike and Kirby are declared joint winners after two excruciating hours in the cold, but there remains the uncomfortable job of inserting a thermometer into a delicate region in order to measure their core temperature. Surprisingly, both lads report their inner temperature has hardly changed. “Regardless of how fat they were, both boys’ bodies have been so efficient in reducing heat loss that their core temperatures haven’t changed, allowing them to keep their vital organs – and brains – nice and warm,” the professor concludes.

After the ice bar, the pigs retire to a pleasant country field for their last stunt –an attempt to break the world record for eating tripe. This vile, smelly foodstuff is offal from a cow’s intestine, and was once a staple of the British diet. Now the boys must eat as much as possible of the white, blubbery fare in 12 minutes, while the professor illustrates the mechanics of a cow’s four stomachs. But which of the pigs will emerge triumphant from this queasy contest? “If you can keep it down, tripe has got a lot to offer,” enthuses the professor.

Also this week, the pigs race a pair of horses to learn the meaning of horsepower, and attach bungee cords to their faces to understand the rubbery properties of human skin.

human guinea pigs (6/8)

Dan, Ollie, Nicky, Mike and Kirby are the Human Guinea Pigs – five best mates who take pleasure in performing outrageous stunts. In today’s programme, Kirby tries to beat the world record for doing car spins whilst eating doughnuts; the boys have their blood sucked by leeches, and Dan’s ‘spare tyre’ undergoes a test to find out just how much fat it contains.

Having grown up together with a shared fascination with hurting themselves, the Human Guinea Pigs are now putting their stupidity to good use to solve a range of scientific conundrums. Along the way the boys are assisted by Professor Stuart Milligan, who pushes them to their limits in the pursuit of knowledge. As the guinea pigs are submitted to various tests, the professor explains what is happening to their bodies using animated images.

In tonight’s edition, foolhardy Kirby attempts to set a new world record in an unlikely field. He is keen to perform a ‘doughnut’ – a stunt whereby a car spins around 360 degrees with its back wheels rotating around its front tyres, leaving a circular mark on the ground. But to make the trick even more interesting, pun-happy Kirby wants to do as many doughnuts as possible whilst eating actual doughnuts. Will this play on words land Kirby a place in the record books for the most doughnuts consumed while doing doughnuts, or will he simply end up with a bad case of car sickness? The professor and the gang keep an eye on events from a safe distance to see how Kirby’s body reacts during the stunt.

Elsewhere, the boys test a long-running medical belief by subjecting themselves to a treatment involving leeches. For centuries, the finest medical minds in the world placed faith in the restorative powers of these slimy blood suckers, with the first known medicinal use of leeches dating back to Ancient Egypt. It was thought that leeches helped drain ‘impure’ blood from the body, although these days doctors have found they are best used in operations to re-attach limbs. But what will these blood-thirsty little parasites do for the professor’s gang of intrepid guinea pigs? The boys apprehensively consent to find out.

Also this week, Dan agrees to be a good sport when he allows the professor and the team to poke around his ‘spare tyre’. Just how much fat is to be found in the flesh around his tummy?

human guinea pigs (4/8)

Dan, Ollie, Nicky, Mike and Kirby are the Human Guinea Pigs –five best mates who take pleasure in performing outrageous stunts and hurting themselves. Now they are putting their stupidity to good use to solve a range of scientific conundrums with the help of Professor Stuart Milligan, who pushes the boys to their limits in the pursuit of knowledge. As the guinea pigs are submitted to various tests, the professor explains what is happening to their bodies using animated images. Today’s programme examines the effects of a car crash on the human body. Ever wondered what it is like to be in a car crash? The main experiment in this edition, entitled ‘Car Karashy’, investigates the different forces to which a body is subjected in a collision. Health and safety regulations mean that the pigs are not allowed to be in a real crash, so Professor Milligan helpfully recreates the same forces in other ways – lucky pigs!

The boys will be demonstrating how the safety equipment in a car works, which can all be explained through physics. The pigs are taken to a karate dojo, where they meet Loughborough University lecturers Andy and Dr Pain –who both happen to have black belts in karate! The pigs are then kitted out, one at a time, with speciallydesigned suits that use the same principles as a car’s crash-absorbing technology. Made out of a super-dense foam, the suits absorb the energy from any crashes the pigs suffer, making sure their internal organs are kept intact.

Andy and Dr Pain take turns practising their moves on the pigs –and hold nothing back after Ollie insults them! The suit acts like a car bumper, which has great shock-absorbing properties. The energy is transferred from Andy’s foot through the suit and into Nicky, resulting in him flying across the floor. According to Professor Milligan, this is “a perfect example of the first law of thermodynamics in action”.

Later on, the guinea pigs are on a rugby pitch, where they are going to recreate a multi-car pileup using Nicky, Ollie and a group of rugby players. Nicky is small of frame and will represent a motorbike, whereas Ollie is larger and will represent a car. The rugby players form a semicircle around each pig and then pound into him from a number of angles.

Ollie is first to don the suit and face the crowd, and is immediately hit hard from behind. As Ollie is unaware of what is going to happen and therefore unable to brace himself, his body moves faster than his head and he consequently suffers a minor example of a common car-crash injury: whiplash. He is in a fair amount of pain – but why? It is because he is absorbing all of the pain in one part of his body – the point of impact –which, in this case, is his ribcage. The rugby players, however, are able to absorb the energy into the whole of their bodies.

Nicky is not happy about taking part in the experiment after seeing what the rugby squad did to Ollie. “Every part of me is telling me not to do this,” he whines. So why is it necessary for Nicky to repeat the experiment?

Professor Milligan explains that because Nicky is smaller, it is important to see where the energy goes when he is hit. Like a motorbike in a real crash, Nicky travels further on impact due to his lower body mass absorbing less energy than Ollie’s. In the space of half an hour, the guinea pigs sustain a broken collarbone, a possible rib fracture and whiplash – proving that they are truly stupid for taking part in such a dangerous experiment! Also in tonight’s programme, Kirby comes face to face with a ghost in order for Professor Milligan to explain the science behind goose pimples; the pigs are tested for ESP and a ten-year-old girl outshines the pigs in a sugary endurance test.

human guinea pigs (3/8)

Dan, Ollie, Nicky, Mike and Kirby are the Human Guinea Pigs –five best mates who take pleasure in performing outrageous stunts. Today’s programme sees the boys head to the limits of lunacy as they are shot with rubber bullets and attacked by angry dogs.

Having grown up together and developed a shared fascination with hurting themselves, the Human Guinea Pigs are now putting their stupidity to good use to solve a range of scientific conundrums. Along the way the boys are assisted by Professor Stuart Milligan, who pushes them to their limits in the pursuit of knowledge. As the guinea pigs are submitted to various tests, the professor explains what is happening to their bodies using animated images.

In tonight’s edition, the boys head across the Atlantic to take their unique brand of idiocy to the USA. Taking advantage of America’s lax gun laws, they decide to test the effects and the efficacy of rubber bullets. Though these projectiles are designed to incapacitate rather than kill, they can still pack a real punch, so viewers are reminded not to try this at home!

Elsewhere, Dan investigates the possible consequences of having too much of a good thing by ingesting vast quantities of vitamin C, and Ollie attempts to beat his personal best on the track with the help of an angry dog. To round the show off with some more suffering in the name of science, the boys explore the various properties of pepper –by attacking each other with spray.

human guinea pigs (2/8)

Dan, Ollie, Nicky, Mike and Kirby are the Human Guinea Pigs –five best mates who take pleasure in performing outrageous stunts and hurting themselves. Now they are putting their stupidity to good use to solve a range of scientific conundrums with the help of Professor Stuart Milligan, who pushes the boys to their limits in the pursuit of knowledge. As the guinea pigs are submitted to various tests, the professor explains what is happening to their bodies using animated images. Today’s programme examines the effects of a car crash on the human body.

Ever wondered what it is like to be in a car crash? The main experiment in this edition, entitled ‘Car Karashy’, investigates the different forces to which a body is subjected in a collision. Health and safety regulations mean that the pigs are not allowed to be in a real crash, so Professor Milligan helpfully recreates the same forces in other ways – lucky pigs!

The boys will be demonstrating how the safety equipment in a car works, which can all be explained through physics. The pigs are taken to a karate dojo, where they meet Loughborough University lecturers Andy and Dr Pain –who both happen to have black belts in karate! The pigs are then kitted out, one at a time, with speciallydesigned suits that use the same principles as a car’s crash-absorbing technology. Made out of a super-dense foam, the suits absorb the energy from any crashes the pigs suffer, making sure their internal organs are kept intact.

Andy and Dr Pain take turns practising their moves on the pigs –and hold nothing back after Ollie insults them! The suit acts like a car bumper, which has great shock-absorbing properties. The energy is transferred from Andy’s foot through the suit and into Nicky, resulting in him flying across the floor. According to Professor Milligan, this is “a perfect example of the first law of thermodynamics in action”.

Later on, the guinea pigs are on a rugby pitch, where they are going to recreate a multi-car pileup using Nicky, Ollie and a group of rugby players. Nicky is small of frame and will represent a motorbike, whereas Ollie is larger and will represent a car. The rugby players form a semicircle around each pig and then pound into him from a number of angles.

Ollie is first to don the suit and face the crowd, and is immediately hit hard from behind. As Ollie is unaware of what is going to happen and therefore unable to brace himself, his body moves faster than his head and he consequently suffers a minor example of a common car-crash injury: whiplash. He is in a fair amount of pain – but why? It is because he is absorbing all of the pain in one part of his body – the point of impact –which, in this case, is his ribcage. The rugby players, however, are able to absorb the energy into the whole of their bodies.

Nicky is not happy about taking part in the experiment after seeing what the rugby squad did to Ollie. “Every part of me is telling me not to do this,” he whines. So why is it necessary for Nicky to repeat the experiment? Professor Milligan explains that because Nicky is smaller, it is important to see where the energy goes when he is hit. Like a motorbike in a real crash, Nicky travels further on impact due to his lower body mass absorbing less energy than Ollie’s. In the space of half an hour, the guinea pigs sustain a broken collarbone, a possible rib fracture and whiplash – proving that they are truly stupid for taking part in such a dangerous experiment!

Also in tonight’s programme, Kirby comes face to face with a ghost in order for Professor Milligan to explain the science behind goose pimples; the pigs are tested for ESP and a ten-year-old girl outshines the pigs in a sugary endurance test.

For the first time on British Television a group of men will be shot with a taser gun to demonstrate the impact of 50,000 volts going through the human body in Five’s new entertainment show Human Guinea Pigs.

Human Guinea Pigs sees five friends experimented on by a professor in the name of science. Dan, Ollie, Nicky, Mike and Kirby were discovered on the internet by Five performing outrageous stunts and in the new series will solve some of life’s greatest mysteries.

Stuart Milligan, professor at Kings College, London will use the human guinea pigs to test scientific theories explaining what’s happening to their bodies using animated images.

In the first episode, the human guinea pigs fly to Seattle to meet police officers who test weapons designed to incapacitate criminals. Here the guinea pigs experience the power of the taser gun.

The taser gun sends a series of electrical shocks through a person’s body, overriding the body’s communication network. As soon as the taser hits, the nervous system is confused and the muscles contract up to 90 times per second. Will our guinea pigs live up to the challenge?

Five will run clips, bloopers and out-takes from the series on Youtube from 6pm today http://www.youtube.com/humanguineapigs

This will run alongside Five’s microsite www.five.tv/humanguineapigs To watch tasering for the first time on British TV watch Human Guinea Pigs, Monday 22nd October, 7.30pm on Five or visit these web addresses.

human guinea pigs (1/8)

New to Five this week is an entertaining series that answers all those imponderable questions you have sometimes wondered, like… what happens when you put 50,000 volts through the human body from a taser? Do different sized objects dropped from the same height really travel at the same speed? And what if those objects are a fat human and a thin human?

Dan, Ollie, Nicky, Mike and Kirby are five best mates who grew up together and were discovered by Five on the internet doing outrageous stunts and hurting themselves. Now they are putting that stupidity to good use to help solve burning pub fact conundrums. These guys are the Human Guinea Pigs, and Professor Stuart Milligan –who teaches at King’s College, London and is the cleverest one of the bunch by far –is going to push the boys to the absolute limits of stupidity in the pursuit of science.

Each show consists of a number of experiments set by the professor. As the boys are submitted to the tests, the Prof explains what is happening to their bodies using animated images.

This week’s show features a first for British television. Nicky, Mark and Kirby have been sent to Seattle, where they meet a group of police officers who test weapons designed to incapacitate criminals without killing them. The guinea pigs are here to discover what happens to the human body when 50,000 volts is surged through it – all thanks to a taser.

Tasers send a series of electrical shocks into a person, overriding the body’s communication network. An overload is not pleasant, as demonstrated by the gang’s screams when they hit the floor, temporarily paralysed. “I couldn’t control anything,” says Nicky. “I felt like a board.” As soon as the taser hits, the nervous system is confused and the muscles contract up to 90 times per second.

Also in the show is an experiment entitled ‘It’s Spin-a-Long Time’. The boys are in their back garden to explain what balance is all about. The first guinea pig to offer his services is Kirby, who sits in a chair in the garden as the others spin him round and round. Professor Milligan explains that the body’s main balance sensors are in the ears, but shows how easy to disrupt these sensors.

The pigs are taken to Bradwell Marina, where they think they will be floating to France on a life raft with no food or water. But in reality they are going to be used to explain what happens to the body during seasickness and why does it happen. They were given lots of beer the night before, fed greasy bacon sandwiches in the morning and wrapped up warm in wet suits – which, unbeknownst to the lads, are all elements to compound seasickness. Able seaman Eric Shaun explains: “There are two stages of seasickness – the first is you think you are going to die; the second is you wish you were going to die.”

The Professor explains that motion sickness involves vision and other senses – a lack of vision combined with a feeling of movement serves to confuse the brain and often elicits an explosive reaction from the guts.

After 47 minutes out at sea, the guinea pigs begin to crack, one by one – except Dan, who remains surprisingly chipper throughout.

human guinea pigs

This entertaining new series sees the principles of chemistry, biology and physics put to the test across of a range of experiments conducted on a group of five young men with a passion for hurting themselves –and each other: the guinea pigs.

The show’s eccentric professor, Stephen Milligan, will guide viewers through the facts and figures as the guinea pigs take part in their own practical experiments. Among the burning issues addressed in the series are how the body deals with sub-zero temperatures; what happens when a number of mosquitoes launch an attack on naked skin; how gravity can hurt a 200-pound man and whether boys are tougher than girls.

The boys all live together in a student house and will carry out their research in the real world, using such sites as car parks, city centres and back gardens.

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