I Own Britain’s Best Home

This ten-part series has seen the owners of some of the most beautiful properties in the country compete for the right to say they own Britain’s best home. The series has focused on individuals who are passionate about their homes: ordinary people who have toiled over build, design and décor to leave a personal stamp on their properties. The final programme in the series takes a closer look at the winning home. Why has this property in particular proven so popular with viewers? Plus, the presenters offer their tips on creating a stylish and comfortable home.

For the last nine weeks, I Own Britain’s Best Home has toured the length and breadth of the country in search of the finest properties in the land. Property consultant Melissa Porter, architectural designer Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell Harris have used their expertise to hunt down truly exceptional homes.

Working from a shortlist of some of the most impressive houses in the country, each presenter spent 24 hours in their chosen property, getting acquainted with the buildings and sniffing out the special features that make them unique.

However, the focus of the series has not just been on design styles and architectural flourishes. The show has also emphasised ‘the home’ as opposed to ‘the building’, encompassing the story of the owners’ relationship with their properties. To this end, the presenters got to know the owners and their families to find out what drove them to design and build their homes. They were keen to explore the individual charms of the properties, irrespective of value or location.

Homes featured across the series include a converted chapel in Yorkshire, a Georgian manor house in Essex, an award-winning new build in North London, a surprising bungalow in Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house in Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing properties ensured an extremely tough competition – but only one home has won the ultimate accolade.

In this special episode, the three experts pay an extra visit to the overall winner of this year’s competition. They find out exactly what makes this property the best home in Britain and why the public have voted it their favourite. The presenters take an in-depth look around the house and spend a whole day there to get a real sense of what it is like to live in Britain’s best home. Charlie, Melissa and Russell find out what inspired the owners to devote so much time and energy to their home, as well offering their personal views on the property in terms of design and décor.

As well as the house visit, the show looks back across the fabulous range of properties and owners that have featured in the series, giving viewers the chance to take inspiration and style tips for their own homes. And, as an extra treat, the presenters will reveal some of their very own secrets for creating the perfect bathroom, kitchen, bedroom and living room.

This series has seen the owners of some of the most beautiful properties in the country compete for the right to say they own Britain’s best home. The show has focused on individuals who are passionate about their homes: ordinary people who have toiled over build, design and décor to leave a personal stamp on their properties. In this week’s final, the winners of each heat battle it out for the ultimate accolade and a cool £25,000.

Over the last four months, architectural designer Charlie Luxton, interiors consultant Melissa Porter and property developer Russell Harris have been up and down the country staying at a selection of Britain’s most beautiful properties, scrutinising each house in fine detail. From the state-of-the-art kitchens to the latest in stylish swimming pools, this intrepid trio have left no stone unturned in order to uncover Britain’s very best residence.

“The idea of staying with complete strangers was a bit daunting at first, but it’s been a fantastic series to work on,” says Melissa. “Every house we’ve looked at has been stunning in some way, and the owners have all been wonderful. In fact, I’ve even made a few friends!”

From the minimal to the cluttered and cosy, from quaint country cottages to eccentric conversions, the selection of properties throughout the series represents a cross-section of Britain’s homes, and provides an insight into the country’s domestic culture. This week sees the culmination of the months-long survey: what does the British public consider to be its ideal home?

“The hardest task in this series has definitely been picking the winners,” explains Russell. “How on earth do you choose between a stylish, contemporary urban apartment and a 600-yearold timber-framed farmhouse? Fortunately for us, that decision has been up to the viewers.”

Each week, viewers have voted for one of three selected properties to make it into the final. Tellingly, it has been the traditional homes that have done really well, although this is no surprise to Charlie. “Whilst architects spend their professional lives designing cutting-edge and contemporary homes,” he says, “they often live in country cottages, because they are the ones with so much character.”

In the series so far, a seaside renovation in Kent, an old water mill in Gloucestershire, a Victorian town house in South London, a folly castle in Yorkshire and an ancestral home in Essex have all won their heats. This week, all the winning homeowners come together for the first time at an exclusive London location. Before the final results are revealed, there is a chance for a second look at the highlights of each of these spectacular homes.

The owners of all eight winning properties talk about the lengths they have had to go to in creating their remarkable homes, and explain what winning their heats has meant to them. Celebrity experts reveal what they have loved about the contenders and their homes, while the three expert presenters share their specialist perspectives on the best of architecture, design and interiors from across the series. However, the eight finalists will not be able to forget that they are gathered for one reason.

At the end of the programme, the final results will be announced and the winning homeowner will walk away with £25,000 and, more importantly, the knowledge that he or she owns Britain’s best home.

This nine-part series sees the owners of some of
the most beautiful properties in the country
competing for the right to say they own Britain’s
Best Home. The series focuses on individuals who
are passionate about their homes: ordinary and
extraordinary people who have toiled over build,
design and décor to leave a personal stamp on
their properties. This week’s programme features a
trendy factory conversion, an eco-friendly property
made from natural materials and a grand Georgian
manor house.
I Own Britain’s Best Home sees a team of three
presenters travel the length and breadth of Britain
in search of the nation’s best residence. Property consultant Melissa Porter, architectural designer Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell Harris have the expertise and the eye to hunt down truly exceptional homes.
After making their selections, the presenters spend 24 hours in their favourite properties, getting acquainted with the buildings and sniffing out the special features that make them unique.
However, I Own Britain’s Best Home is not just interested in beautiful design and architectural flourishes – the series emphasises ‘the home’ as opposed to ‘the building’, and it aims to encompass the story of the owners’ relationship with their properties. To this end, the presenters get to know the owners and their families to find out what drove them to design and build their homes.
They are keen to explore the individual charms of the properties, irrespective of value or location.
Each programme features three properties of different types, from thatched country cottages to urban bachelor pads. At the end of the show, viewers have the opportunity to vote for their favourite. The winner from each heat goes through to the final, where one property will eventually be awarded the title of Best Home. Homes featured across the series include a converted chapel in Yorkshire, a Georgian manor house in Essex, an award-winning new build in North London, a surprising bungalow in Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house in Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing properties promises an extremely tough competition – but only one home can win the ultimate accolade.
In this week’s instalment, Melissa, Charlie and Russell test-drive an innovative, eco-friendly house in Devon built from mud and straw, an impeccable Georgian manor house in Tunbridge Wells and a super-sleek factory conversion in the Midlands.

This nine-part series sees the owners of some of
the most beautiful properties in the country
competing for the right to say they own Britain’s
Best Home. The series focuses on individuals who
are passionate about their homes: ordinary and
extraordinary people who have toiled over build,
design and décor to leave a personal stamp on
their properties. This week’s programme features a
medieval house, a surprising bungalow and a
glamorous, gadget-filled home.
I Own Britain’s Best Home sees a team of three
presenters travel the length and breadth of Britain
in search of the nation’s best residence. Property
consultant Melissa Porter, architectural designer
Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell
Harris have the expertise and the eye to hunt
down truly exceptional homes.
After making their selections, the presenters
spend 24 hours in their favourite properties,
getting acquainted with the buildings and sniffing out the special features that make them unique.
However, I Own Britain’s Best Home is not just interested in beautiful design and architectural flourishes – the series emphasises ‘the home’ as opposed to ‘the building’, and it aims to encompass the story of the owners’ relationship with their properties. To this end, the presenters get to know the owners and their families to find out what drove them to design and build their homes.
They are keen to explore the individual charms of the properties, irrespective of value or location. Each programme features three properties of different types, from thatched country cottages to urban bachelor pads. At the end of the show, viewers have the opportunity to vote for their favourite. The winner from each heat goes through to the final, where one property will eventually be awarded the title of Best Home.
Homes featured across the series include a converted chapel in Yorkshire, a Georgian manor house in Essex, an award-winning new build in North London, a surprising bungalow in Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house in Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing properties promises an extremely tough competition – but only one home can win the ultimate accolade.
In this week’s instalment, Melissa, Charlie and Russell road-test a medieval timber-framed house in Sussex, a surprising bungalow in the Lake District and a glamorous Bond-style home in the Midlands. Which property will win a place in the final for a chance to claim the coveted title and a cool £25,000?

This nine-part series sees the owners of some of
the most beautiful properties in the country
competing for the right to say they own Britain’s
Best Home. The series focuses on individuals who
are passionate about their homes: ordinary and
extraordinary people who have toiled over build,
design and décor to leave a personal stamp on
their properties. This week’s instalment features a
woodland cottage, a modern flat set within a
Gothic mansion, and a Georgian townhouse in the
West Country.
I Own Britain’s Best Home sees a team of three
presenters travel the length and breadth of Britain
in search of the nation’s best residence. Property
consultant Melissa Porter, architectural designer
Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell
Harris have the expertise and the eye to hunt
down truly exceptional homes.
After making their selections, the presenters
spend 24 hours in their favourite properties, getting acquainted with the buildings and sniffing out the special features that make them unique.
However, I Own Britain’s Best Home is not just interested in beautiful design and architectural flourishes – the series emphasises ‘the home’ as opposed to ‘the building’, and it aims to
encompass the story of the owners’ relationship with their properties. To this end, the presenters get to know the owners and their families to find out what drove them to design and build their homes.
They are keen to explore the individual charms of the properties, irrespective of value or location.
Each programme features three properties of different types, from thatched country cottages to urban bachelor pads. At the end of the show, viewers have the opportunity to vote for their favourite. The winner from each heat goes through to the final, where one property will eventually be awarded the title of Best Home.
Homes featured across the series include a converted chapel in Yorkshire, a Georgian manor house in Essex, an award-winning new build in North London, a surprising bungalow in Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house in Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing properties promises an extremely tough competition – but only one home can win the ultimate accolade.
In this week’s programme, the team road-tests an amazing restoration of a woodland cottage, a modern flat set within a Gothic mansion, and a boutique hotel-style refurbishment of a Georgian townhouse in the West Country. Which property will win a place in the final for a chance to claim the coveted title and a cool £25,000?

This nine-part series sees the owners of some of
the most beautiful properties in the country
competing for the right to say they own Britain’s
Best Home. The series focuses on individuals
who are passionate about their homes: ordinary
and extraordinary people who have toiled over
build, design and décor to leave a personal stamp
on their properties. This week’s instalment
features an ancestral home in Essex with a castle
in the garden, a 16th-century thatched cottage in
Berkshire and a tribute to art deco in Durham.
I Own Britain’s Best Home sees a team of three
presenters travel the length and breadth of Britain
in search of the nation’s best residence. Property
consultant Melissa Porter, architectural designer
Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell
Harris have the expertise and the eye to hunt
down truly exceptional homes.
After making their selections, the presenters
spend 24 hours in their favourite properties,
getting acquainted with the buildings and sniffing
out the special features that make them unique.
However, I Own Britain’s Best Home is not just
interested in beautiful design and architectural
flourishes – the series emphasises ‘the home’ as
opposed to ‘the building’, and it aims to
encompass the story of the owners’ relationship
with their properties. To this end, the presenters get
to know the owners and their families to find out
what drove them to design and build their homes.
They are keen to explore the individual charms of
the properties, irrespective of value or location.
Each programme features three properties of
different types, from thatched country cottages to
urban bachelor pads. At the end of the show,
viewers have the opportunity to vote for their
favourite. The winner from each heat goes through
to the final, where one property will eventually be
awarded the title of Best Home.
Homes featured across the series include a
converted chapel in Yorkshire, a Georgian manor
house in Essex, an award-winning new build in
North London, a surprising bungalow in
Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house in
Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing properties
promises an extremely tough competition – but
only one home can win the ultimate accolade.
First up this week, Charlie travels to an ancestral
pile in Essex where some lucky locals enjoy a
home life steeped in history. Not only do these
homeowners live in a Georgian manor house
dripping with shabby chic, they boast a Norman
keep in their garden. The stunning Hedingham
Castle sits proudly in the manor grounds – offering
dramatic views.
Elsewhere, Melissa is in Cookham Dean,
Berkshire, where she meets Kym and John, the
proud owners of a beautiful thatched cottage.
Melissa learns that buying a 16th-century, Grade
II-listed cottage can certainly test one’s patience
when it comes to renovation work. But with a bit
of perseverance and a lot of hard work, Kym and
John have given their home a contemporary look
whilst maintaining many of its original features.
And for the third property this week, Russell
heads to Durham to view a stunning art decoinspired
villa. Owner Mike Keen explains that,
having lived in a 1950s bungalow on the same
site for 15 years, he decided it was time to realise
his dream of building his own tribute to art deco.
The result is a high-tech, stylish villa with Spanish
influences, boasting its very own swimming pool,
bar and dance floor.

This nine-part series sees the owners of some of
the most beautiful properties in the country
competing for the right to say they own Britain’s
Best Home. The series focuses on individuals who
are passionate about their homes: ordinary and
extraordinary people who have toiled over build,
design and décor to leave a personal stamp on
their properties. In this week’s instalment, the
experts visit a new-build in Fife, a castle in Halifax
and a Victorian renovation in Surrey.
I Own Britain’s Best Home sees a team of three
presenters travel the length and breadth of Britain
in search of the nation’s best residence. Property
consultant Melissa Porter, architectural designer
Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell
Harris have the expertise and the eye to hunt
down truly exceptional homes.
After making their selections, the presenters
spend 24 hours in their favourite properties,
getting acquainted with the buildings and sniffing
out the special features that make them unique.
However, I Own Britain’s Best Home is not just
interested in beautiful design and architectural
flourishes – the series emphasises ‘the home’ as
opposed to ‘the building’, and it aims to
encompass the story of the owners’ relationship
with their properties. To this end, the presenters get
to know the owners and their families to find out
what drove them to design and build their homes.
They are keen to explore the individual charms of
the properties, irrespective of value or location.
Each programme features three properties of
different types, from thatched country cottages to
urban bachelor pads. At the end of the show,
viewers have the opportunity to vote for their
favourite. The winner from each heat goes through
to the final, where one property will eventually be
awarded the title of Best Home.
Homes featured across the series include a
converted chapel in Yorkshire, a Georgian manor
house in Essex, an award-winning new build in
North London, a surprising bungalow in
Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house in
Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing properties
promises an extremely tough competition – but
only one home can win the ultimate accolade.
First up this week, Charlie heads to Fife on the
east coast of Scotland to examine a new-build
property. This dramatic and contemporary
building was designed as an intimate and private
home. The vast expanse of glass that makes up
the front wall of the house connects seamlessly
with the walled garden to provide an impressive
indoor/outdoor feeling.
Meanwhile, Russell visits the grand home of
David Gold in Surrey. When David first bought the
huge Victorian building in Caterham in the 1990s,
it was on the brink of collapse and many people
thought him mad. However, he has since proved
to be something of a visionary. Nestled in the
middle of 55 acres of land, the Chalet has been
restored with pride and passion and now stands
as a testament to both Victorian grandeur and
David’s determination.
Also this week, Melissa travels to Halifax in
West Yorkshire to discover how the owners of a
19th-century folly have transformed an
ornamental building into a breathtaking yet
practical home.

This nine-part series sees the owners of some of
the most beautiful properties in the country
competing for the right to say they own Britain’s
Best Home. The series focuses on individuals who
are passionate about their homes: ordinary and
extraordinary people who have toiled over build,
design and décor to leave a personal stamp on
their properties. In this week’s instalment, the
presenters visit a sleek, modern home in Leeds, an
art-deco house in Middlesex, and a palatial
Victorian house in South London.
I Own Britain’s Best Home sees a team of three
enthusiastic presenters travel the length and
breadth of Britain in search of the nation’s best
residence. Property consultant Melissa Porter
(presenter of ‘Put Your Money Where Your House
Is’ and ‘Get a New Life’), architectural designer
Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell
Harris have the expertise and the eye to hunt
down truly exceptional homes.
After making their selections, the presenters
spend 24 hours in their favourite properties,
getting acquainted with the buildings and sniffing
out the special features that make them unique.
However, I Own Britain’s Best Home is not just
interested in beautiful design and architectural
flourishes – the series emphasises ‘the home’ as
opposed to ‘the building’, and it aims to
encompass the story of the owners’ relationship
with their properties. To this end, the presenters get
to know the owners and their families to find out
what drove them to design and build their homes.
They are keen to explore the individual charms of
the properties, irrespective of value or location.
Each programme features three properties of
different types, from thatched country cottages to
urban bachelor pads. At the end of the show,
viewers have the opportunity to vote for their
favourite. The winner from each heat goes through
to the final, where one property will eventually be
awarded the title of Best Home.
Homes featured across the series include a
converted chapel in Yorkshire, a Georgian manor
house in Essex, an award-winning new build in
North London, a surprising bungalow in
Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house in
Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing properties
promises an extremely tough competition – but
only one home can win the ultimate accolade.
First up this week, Charlie heads to Yorkshire to
examine a modern family home in the ‘millionaire’s
row’ area of Leeds. With interiors inspired by the
Sanderson – a lavish, five-star boutique hotel in
the heart of London – this ultra-modern house is
sleek and stylish. However, the space avoids
appearing cold and clinical thanks to a passion
for creating a comfortable and warm family home
on the part of owners Marc and Lucinda.
Melissa, meanwhile, visits Northwood in
Middlesex to look at a detached, art-deco style
house built in the 1950s. Ken and Yvonne Spektor
moved into the property 22 years ago, and have
since built numerous extensions and undertaken
substantial renovations. Behind the elegant greenand-
white exterior is a unique, interesting interior.
Open-plan living acts as a perfect backdrop for
Yvonne’s paintings and a plethora of eclectic
artefacts, bold furniture and decorative
accessories. Surrounded by modest suburban
architecture, the Spektors have created something
rather special in this quiet corner of Middlesex.
Finally this week, Russell visits a Victorian
house in the southwest of London. Michael and
Catherine Bains, an architect and a writer/stylist
respectively, have created their own interpretation
of a white palace within their five-bedroom
Victorian house in Tooting. With a love of all things
white, the couple have painstakingly restored the
original fixtures and fittings, and have extended
the property at the rear with an ultra-modern
lounge/dining area. Michael’s masculine
approach to design is softened by Catherine’s
passion for classic French style. But is the
property grand enough to win the coveted title?

This new nine-part series sees the owners of some
of the most beautiful properties in the country
competing for the right to say they own Britain’s
Best Home. The series focuses on individuals who
are passionate about their own homes: ordinary
and extraordinary people who have toiled over
build, design and décor to leave a personal stamp
on their properties. This episode visits a modern
flat in London’s Barbican Centre, a converted
watermill in Gloucestershire and a 1930s
bungalow in Eastbourne.
I Own Britain’s Best Home sees a team of three
enthusiastic presenters travel the length and
breadth of Britain in search of the nation’s best
residence. Property consultant Melissa Porter
(presenter of ‘Put Your Money Where Your House
Is’ and ‘Get a New Life’), architectural designer
Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell
Harris have the expertise and the eye to hunt
down truly exceptional homes.
After making their selections, the presenters
spend 24 hours in their favourite properties,
getting acquainted with the buildings and their
characters, and sniffing out the special features
that make them unique.
However, I Own Britain’s Best Home is not just
interested in beautiful design and architectural
flourishes – the series emphasises ‘the home’ as
opposed to ‘the building’, and it aims to
encompass the story of the owners’ relationship
with their properties. To this end, the presenters get
to know the owners and their families to find out
what drove them to design and build their homes.
They are keen to explore the individual charms of
the properties, irrespective of value or location.
Each programme features three properties of
different types, from thatched country cottages to
urban bachelor pads. At the end of the show, the
public have the opportunity to vote for their
favourite. The winner from each heat goes
through to the final, where one property will
eventually be awarded the title of Best Home –
and its owners presented with a cool £25,000.
Homes featured across the series include a
converted chapel in Yorkshire, a Georgian manor
house in Essex, an award-winning new build in
North London, a surprising bungalow in
Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house
in Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing
properties promises an extremely tough
competition – but only one home can win the
ultimate accolade.
First up this week, Melissa, Charlie and Russell
visit London’s famous Barbican Centre to find out
how two architects have added their distinctive
touch to their home. The Barbican Centre is one
of the biggest architectural statements of 1960s
London, so what happened when owners Ken
and Tracey had the chance to refashion one of its
flats? The answer is a hyper-cool, ultra-functional
family home. Ken and Tracey have created a
super-sleek space that celebrates the fabric of
the Barbican itself, whilst catapulting it into the
21st century.
The team’s next destination is in
Gloucestershire, where a Grade II-listed watermill
set in the spectacular grounds of a 17th-century
home has been converted into a comfortable
base for a family of five. Boasting seven
bedrooms, five bathrooms, a music room, a
maze, a tennis court, a wooden bridge and a
waterfall, this remarkable home’s crowning glory
is the River Leach, which runs directly beneath
the property.
The final home this week is a 1930s bungalow
located in a quiet cul-de-sac in the seaside town
of Eastbourne, East Sussex. Owner and designer
Martin Swatton has turned his home into an
open-plan bachelor pad. Working with a
surprisingly low budget, Martin has managed to
achieve designer good looks in a property that is
high on style and functionality – the ideal space
for a man in his position!

This new nine-part series sees the owners of some of the most beautiful properties in the country competing for the right to say they own Britain’s Best Home. The series focuses on individuals who are passionate about their own homes: ordinary and extraordinary people who have toiled over build, design and d́ecor to leave a personal stamp on their properties. The first episode in the series visits a mock-Georgian house in Hertfordshire, a converted chapel in Yorkshire and a stunning seaside home in Folkestone.

I Own Britain’s Best Home sees a team of three enthusiastic presenters travelling the length and breadth of Britain in search of the nation’s best residence. Property consultant Melissa Porter (presenter of ‘Put Your Money Where Your House Is’ and ‘Get a New Life’), architectural designer Charlie Luxton and property developer Russell Harris have the expertise and the eye to hunt down truly exceptional homes.
After making their selections, the presenters spend 24 hours in their favourite properties, getting acquainted with the buildings and their characters, and sniffing out the special features that make them unique.

However, I Own Britain’s Best Home is not just interested in beautiful design and architectural flourishes – the series emphasises ‘the home’ as opposed to ‘the building’, and it aims to encompass the story of the owners’ relationship with their properties. To this end, the presenters get to know the owners and their families to find out what drove them to design and build their homes. They are keen to explore the individual charms of the properties, irrespective of value or location.

Each programme features three properties of different types, from thatched country cottages to urban bachelor pads. At the end of the show, the public have the opportunity to vote for their favourite. The winner from each heat goes through to the final, where one property will eventually be awarded the title of Best Home – and its owners presented with a cool £25,000.

Homes featured across the series include a sleek family flat in London’s Barbican Centre, a Georgian manor house in Essex, an award-winning new build in North London, a surprising bungalow in Eastbourne and a footballers’ wives-style house in Hertfordshire. Such a wealth of amazing properties promises an extremely tough competition – but only one home can win the ultimate accolade.

In the opening episode of the series, Melissa, Charlie and Russell visit Ambleside House in Hertfordshire. They find out what it is like to live in this stately mock-Georgian pile with a spot of cooking and a big dinner.

Elsewhere, the team heads to Holmfirth in Yorkshire to visit a converted 18th-century chapel. Owner Martine was determined to stop the building falling into the hands of a property developer, so she set about transforming it from a derelict church into a contemporary, light-filled family home. The born-again chapel is inspired by –and designed around –its beautiful stained-glass window.

Also this week, the presenters inspect a four-bedroom 18th-century house in Folkestone that has been converted into a modern two-bed bachelor pad. This striking property backs onto the pebbled beach and its glass exterior offers stunning panoramic views of the English Channel. The home also boasts an array of cheeky boys’ toys including a futuristic thumbprint detector instead of a front door key. The property has already won a RIBA Downland Prize in the Best Conversion category and has been shortlisted for a Kent Design Award. But has it got what it takes to be voted Britain’s Best Home?

Saturday March 15

  • BBC One
  • BBC Two
  • BBC Three
  • ITV1
  • ITV2
  • 4
  • E4
  • Film4
  • More4
  • Five
  • Fiver
  • Sky1