Law & Order: UK

Friday, 17 February 2012, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

Series final: 

In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two groups. The police who investigate the crime, and the Crown prosecutors who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories… 

The critically acclaimed cast of Law&Order: UK are back for a sixth series with Paul Nicholls in the role of DS Sam Casey. 

This seven part series starring Bradley Walsh, Harriet Walter, Freema Agyeman, Peter Davison and Dominic Rowan, ends on a dramatic note tonight. 

Says Bradley Walsh:”At certain points during the series Ronnie does treat Sam like a scalded child. Rightly or wrongly he sometimes pulls on the reins imploring Sam not to make the mistakes he made. Sometimes Sam tells him to mind his own business but in this episode Paul’s character behaves totally inappropriately. In the end experience shows but Ronnie isn’t the sort of bloke to say I told you so, he never judges. He truly believes you learn by your mistakes and they have become pals even if they have differences of opinion.” 

Explains Paul Nicholls: “Sam behaves very recklessly in this episode but there is something about this particular victim that really touches him. He is affected by her vulnerability and just wants to help and protect her. He really believes there is something between them. He’s got a failed marriage, he is always working and he gets too involved. Ronnie warns him many times but Sam is stubborn. He has something to prove to the world but he ends up jeopardising the case and risking his career.” 

In the final episode of series six the crime strikes a little closer to home when police forensics lab technician, Kelly Mahon, is stabbed to death in her home. While Sam (Paul Nicholls) and Ronnie (Bradley Walsh) pursue their lead suspect, another victim is attacked in what appears to be an identical crime. However, the second victim, Lucy Kennard (Lydia Leonard) survives and is able to identify her attacker. In a fragile and vulnerable state, the victim feels safest in the company of the police and before long, she and Sam fall for each other. 

What should be a straightforward case soon to be proves anything but for Jake *(Dominic Rowan) and Alesha (Freema Agyeman) owing to Sam’s indiscretion. Desperate to regain his colleagues’ respect, Sam puts his own feelings aside to pursue justice. But in this heartfelt and surprising series finale, is that enough to save his career? Also starring Patricia Potter, Luke Roberts and Jennifer James. 

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, written by Emilia di Girolamo and directed by David O’Neill. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production. 

Friday, 10 February 2012, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

The critically acclaimed cast of Law&Order: UK are back for a sixth series with Paul Nicholls in the role of DS Sam Casey. 

This seven part series starring Bradley Walsh, Harriet Walter, Freema Agyeman, Peter Davison and Dominic Rowan, sees the police and legal teams facing a shocking crime captured on video, up against the clock in the search for a hostage, and exposing a tragic, medical cover-up. Cases are reopened, the past threatens to catch up with Ronnie (Walsh) and careers are on the line… 

Tonight’s episode is a day in the life of the heroes of Law & Order: UK, the action of the episode takes place over one long day as our team work three separate cases. The first begins at 6am when DS Sam Casey (Paul Nicholls) and DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) are called to a deserted city street where community police officers have found the body of murdered barman, Derek Strachan, shot dead in his car. On their way back to the station from the crime scene, our heroes respond to a 999 call in a nearby office where a sibling spat has turned murderous. A frenetic morning for the cops takes an unexpected turn when an allegation of police intimidation is made against one of the team. 

The day proves no less busy for Crown Prosecutors Jake Thorne (Dominic Rowan) and Alesha Phillips (Freema Agyeman) who are hit from left field when one of the defendants in an attempted murder trial alleges to have made a false confession after being intimidated by a police officer. With their case hanging in the balance, the team have until day’s end to prove the allegation is false. On a day that proves to be the longest 24 hours in their working lives, will all of the team make it through with their careers intact? 

This episode is written and produced by Richard Stokes and directed by Mark Everest. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production. 

Friday, 27 January 2012, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

The critically acclaimed cast of Law&Order: UK are back for a sixth series with Paul Nicholls in the role of DS Sam Casey. 

This seven part series starring Bradley Walsh, Harriet Walter, Freema Agyeman, Peter Davison and Dominic Rowan, sees the police and legal teams facing a shocking crime captured on video, up against the clock in the search for a hostage, and exposing a tragic, medical cover-up. Cases are reopened, the past threatens to catch up with Ronnie (Walsh) and careers are on the line… 

Talking about tonight’s epiosde Dominic Rowan, who plays Jack Thorne, says “This episode looks at a case of medical negligence where Toby Stephens character is pressing for completion of a drug trial to get it on to the market. It is great to work with contemporaries like Toby. He is a great actor and was very genial and funny. I really enjoyed filming all the twists and turns inthis storyline. 

“By now Jake is aware of his position in the CPS, the hierarchy and what is expected of him. He isn’t the new boy any more. If he thinks for instance that Sam is impeding his work he lets him know in no uncertain terms – “we’re running the show you investigate if we say so”. Jake doesn’t worry about the personal relationship but the structural relationship and getting the right outcome.” 

In tonight’s episode the murder of an elderly janitor, Jonathan Waldman, was so carefully planned and executed that the police are left without a single piece of forensic evidence to pursue in the hunt for Waldman’s killer. Adding to the mystery of the case is the fact that the highly elaborate crime is notated in exhaustive and precise detail in a manual purchased three weeks earlier in the victim’s name. Was the killer trying to frame the victim for his own murder? 

Through painstaking detection, DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) and DS Sam Casey (Paul Nicholls) find the killer who freely admits to the crime but a successful prosecution is complicated when canny defence lawyer, Rachel Mathesson (Pennie Downie), has a key piece of evidence excluded. When it looks like the killer might get off entirely, Jake (Dominic Rowan) and Alesha (Freema Agyeman) take drastic action and uncover a heartbreaking piece of evidence which means there is more than one killer to prosecute. Starring Toby Stephens. 

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, directed by David O’Neill and written by Nick Hicks-Breach. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production. 

Friday, 13 January 2012, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

Immune: 

Paul Nicholls joins Bradley Walsh, Harriet Walter, Freema Agyeman, Peter Davison and Dominic Rowan for the sixth series of the crritically acclaimed ITV drama Law & Order: UK. 

This seven part series sees the police and legal teams facing a shocking crime captured on video, up against the clock in the search for a hostage, and exposing a tragic, medical cover-up. Cases are reopened, the past threatens to catch up with Ronnie (Walsh) and careers are on the line… 

Tamzin Outhwaite guest stars in tonight’s episode. 

Says Nicholls, who plays DS Sam Casey:”This was a favourite episode for me and suited Sam’s character down to the ground. Sam and his partner Ronnie (Walsh) have 12 hours to find a hostage and this style of policing lends itself to Sam’s way of working and his personality. 

“In this episode a criminal has leverage over the police and the CPS and wants immunity from the law in exchange for vital information. Basically his lawyer, played by Tamzin Outhwaite, wants a deal and Sam is outraged that the CPS would even consider bargaining with this criminal. He and Ronnie have 12 hours to use any means necessary to find this hostage. It’s when he is up against the clock that Sam’s his true character comes out. 

He is frustrated but the challenge really shows his investigative skills, intelligence and intuition and also his dedication to the job and drive to get to the truth.” 

In tonight’s episode a bungled robbery leads to an innocent have-a-go hero being shot dead and a cab driver being taken hostage by the two thieves making a getaway from the crime scene. When the police capture one of the accused, Frank Donovan (Rob Jarvis), they are desperate to know the whereabouts of his hostage who has a potentially fatal medical condition. Realising he has a bargaining chip to play with, Donovan offers the team a deal – he’ll tell them where the cab driver is in return for an immunity agreement. The stakes have never been so high for DS Sam Casey (Paul Nicholls)and DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) who are given a ten hour reprieve to find the hostage. 

Donovan’s lawyer, the uncompromising Miriam Pescatore (Tamzin Outhwaite), drives a hard bargain and with no physical evidence to connect Donovan to the scene, are Jake Thorne (Dominic Rowan) and Alesha Phillips (Freema Agyeman) about to watch a self-confessed killer walk free? 

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, directed by James Strong and written by Nick Hicks-Breach. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production.

Friday, 6 January 2012, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

Survivor’s Guilt: 

In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two groups. The police who investigate the crime, and the Crown prosecutors who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories… 

Paul Nicholls joins the cast of ITV’s successful, long-running drama Law & Order: UK for series six which begins with an emotional cliff-hanger. 

Nicholls (Secret Diary of a Call Girl, Harley Street) is DS Sam Casey, a headstrong young officer with a strong sense of justice brought in to investigate the shooting of DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber). 

Nicholls joins a critically acclaimed cast, including Bradley Walsh, Harriet Walter, Freema Agyeman, Peter Davison and Dominic Rowan who achieved an average audience of 5.6 million and a 21% share during series five Law & Order: UK which was shown in summer 2011. 

This seven part series sees the police and legal teams facing a shocking crime captured on video, up against the clock in the search for a hostage, and exposing a tragic, medical cover-up. Cases are reopened, the past threatens to catch up with Ronnie (Walsh) and careers are on the line… 

Quality guest stars join the cast for series six including Colin Salmon, Tamzin Outhwaite, Toby Stephens, Eva Pope, Luke Roberts and Tim McInnerny. 

New boy Paul Nicholls admits he had to run to keep up with a fast moving production… 

“It was terrifying coming onto Law & Order: UK even though everyone was lovely. I think the show is amazing; the production values, the quality of storylines and acting. I’d done all my research, turned up on set all prepared but they shoot very quickly. If you start off in drama like that from the beginning people find their way through it together but I walked in and it was all up and running, and I had to run to keep up. I wasn’t used to that pace of work but I got used to it very quickly. Brad is an absolute diamond and did help me a lot. He sat me down on my first day and said ‘let me tell me you how this show works – like lightening!’ 

“Bradley is one of the funniest guys I’ve ever worked with. I’m terrible at corpsing so he knew that within days and would say something just before I was about to go on. He is such a joker but always keeps a straight face and does a great job. Then he’d tell me I’m unprofessional because I’m laughing… we had such a great time on set.” 

Talking about his character Paul says: “I see Sam as a nice guy who lives for his job. As a kid I think he probably could have gone either way; become a career criminal or joined the police force. The way I approached the part was by thinking ‘if you’re going to be a good detective you have to know how a criminal thinks’. So I did a lot of research on criminals and criminal behaviour. 

“I read a lot about organised crime and London gang culture. I was really shocked, I couldn’t believe it. Then I started watching this Discovery Channel show, 48 Hours, which was perfect for the part I was preparing for. I know reality is reality and fiction is fiction and any drama has to take liberties but what I saw about murder investigation was fascinating and I watched it religiously. 

“It is scary coming into an established show. From the start you want to make the character your own, put your own stamp on it, and not repeat what someone else has done. That’s what I did rightly or wrongly. I saw Sam as his own man. I played Sam as a poacher turned gamekeeper type – you have to know the game if you’re going to be one step ahead. As a consequence he is hot headed and doesn’t follow the rules all the time. For him it’s all about getting a conviction, all about the result and the quickest way to it. Sam doesn’t see why he has to deal with the red tape when it might be plainly obvious a suspect is guilty. 

“He’s not dishonest just impatient. His job is to investigate, find the perpetrator and make an arrest. But when he hands over to CPS the legal jargon starts happening and that’s when people can walk away from crimes they’ve committed on a technicality. On these occasions he clashes with Jake Thorne (Dominic Rowan) and Sam does take his frustrations out on Jake more than once. 

“Ronnie runs on his gut instincts and feelings but he is very wise. Sometimes Sam can be bit reckless or a bit immature but I think they are very similar. Sam is driven by his feelings and ruled by his heart. Ronnie can see a mile off every bad mistake Sam makes because he’s probably made them all himself. Sometimes Sam pushes the line of law enforcement or bends the rules but he’s just being impulsive. He is basically a very good detective and he wants to learn from Ronnie.” 

Paul continues: “I can see why people want to be a homicide detective or in CID because in my eyes that kind of public service consumes your whole life. It’s all consuming and it takes a certain type of person to be like that; to live through their work and live for it. 

“In a small way it is like that for me when I’m on set. Often when we were filming this I had an 18 hour day door to door. There was no time for anything else. I love that, it gives you meaning and purpose and makes you feels useful. I love getting lost in my work. I’m never happier than when I’m working long hours.” 

So how does Paul relax when he isn’t working? 

“Boxing. When I’m not working I find that I still get up early so I go to the gym. I might do a two mile run, do five rounds on a punch bag – I don’t spar anymore as I got concussion once! – have a go on the bike, and I just find whatever has been going through my head, whatever stress I had, simply lifts. I don’t do it every day but when I’m not working gym is massive part of my life. Healthy body; healthy mind.” 

In this week’s episode a drive-by shooting outside the Old Bailey leaves one police officer dead and another wounded in what appears to be a targeted attack on a witness giving evidence in an attempted murder trial. However, as DS Casey (Paul Nicholls) and the team investigate, they are surprised to learn the gunman was specifically targeting police officers believing his family to be the victim of a police cover-up. 

In a case that sees the whole team emotionally spent, defence barrister, Doug Greer (Colin Salmon) argues that his client was the victim of police racism. Have our heroes gone too far in trying to bring a cop-killer to justice? In failing to separate the personal from the professional, the trial is at risk of being derailed unless Jake (Dominic Rowan) and Alesha (Freema Agyeman) can convince the jury that the defendant is not a victim but a murderer. 

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, directed by Andy Goddard and written by Emilia di Girolamo. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production. 

Sunday, 14 August 2011, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

Series finale: 

Deal: 

The final episode of series five sees the police and prosecutors of Law & Order: UK facing their darkest hour.

In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two groups. The police who investigate the crime, and the Crown prosecutors who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories… 

The final episode of series five sees the police and prosecutors of Law & Order: UK facing their darkest hour.

Lead writer Emilia di Girolamo says: “We end series five on an enormous cliffhanger and we believe for our loyal audience it’ll be worth the wait for series six to find out what happens. In these two episodes we have the most explosive, emotionally charged and heart-rending episodes Law & Order:UK has ever done.”

Peter Davison and Dominic Rowan join the cast of ITV’s highly successful drama Law & Order: UK for the fifth series.

This time around the critically acclaimed cast, including Bradley Walsh, Jamie Bamber and Freema Agyeman have a tough, new ally in their fight for justice in the form of Senior Crown Prosecutor Jake Thorne; a gifted and uncompromising prosecutor played by Dominic Rowan (Catwalk Dogs, The Family Man).

And Peter Davison (Unforgiven, Distant Shores,The Last Detective) is Henry Sharpe taking over the job of Director of the CPS. Henry is a down to earth pragmatist and a great boss who has worked with Jake Thorne before.

In the last episode of the series the team struggles to understand the involvement of 12-year-old Kaden Blake in the shooting of mother and carer, Lia Brown. DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber) is drawn to this damaged boy, saddened to see a life doomed by circumstance, furious that gang leader and local dealer, Mark Ellis (Charles Mnene), remains untouchable by the law.

Matt forces the hands of our Crown Prosecutors to move Ellis into the frame for the crime. The culture of intimidation and silence that rules gang life seems set to undo all of our heroes’ good work. It is up to Kaden himself to find the courage to speak out. In doing so, he sets in motion a shattering chain of events. One day that will shake the world of our heroes forever. Lucy Speed guest stars.

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, directed by Andy Goddard and written by Emilia di Girolamo. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production.

Sunday, 10 July 2011, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

SERIES FIVE: 

In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two groups. The police who investigate the crime, and the Crown prosecutors who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories… 

Peter Davison and Dominic Rowan join the cast of ITV’s highly successful drama Law & Order: UK for the fifth series. 

This time around the critically acclaimed cast, including Bradley Walsh, Jamie Bamber and Freema Agyeman have a tough, new ally in their fight for justice in the form of Senior Crown Prosecutor Jake Thorne; a gifted and uncompromising prosecutor played by Dominic Rowan (Catwalk Dogs, The Family Man). 

And Peter Davison (Unforgiven, Distant Shores,The Last Detective) is Henry Sharpe taking over the job of Director of the CPS. Henry is a down to earth pragmatist and a great boss who has worked with Jake Thorne before. 

This series sees prosecution team Alesha Phillips (Freema Agyeman) and Jake Thorne (Dominic Rowan) struggle to get to the truth behind a missing toddler and the brutal murder of a much loved couple asleep in their new home. 

While DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) and DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber) investigate a hospital department with more than its fair share of untimely deaths, track down a rampaging gunman and discover the events that led to an innocent woman being gunned down in her own home – events that have serious consequences for the team. 

A quality array of guest stars including James Fox, Lesley Manville, Greg Wise, Sam West, Lucy Speed and Patricia Potter will join the cast for series five. 

Playing Senior Crown Prosecutor Jake Thorne certainly had an effect on Dominic Rowan; he started to cross-examine in his sleep! 

“Apparently I wasn’t cross-examining a particular witness but I was lodging ‘an objection my lord’ in my sleep, which I have no recall of,” says Dominic. “Because of a relatively tight schedule and courtroom scenes between me and a witness, which can be four or five pages long, I was drumming the lines into my head so I had flexibility and always knew what was coming up. I must have been rehearsing it in my sleep because I wanted to be sure I could do it well. Luckily the sleep prosecuting didn’t last.

“In the first episode I had James Fox in the witness box and we had a four and a half page duologue which was fantastic but a bit nerve wracking. It was tricky because not only was there ‘legalese’ but as he was playing a doctor, medical terminology too but he was great and very professional and we just got on with it.” 

Tonight’s episode is The Wrong Man Guest starring James Fox as Dr Edward Austen and Frances Tomelty as Sister Logan. Brought into A&E with flu-like symptoms and leaving in a body bag, Suzanne Morton’s death is treated as suspicious by DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) and DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber) as they investigate a hospital department which has had three such untimely deaths within six months. With an extremely busy A&E ward the night Suzanne died, can our heroes find the killer before the killer finds their next victim? 

Senior Crown Prosecutor, Jake Thorne (Dominic Rowan) is pulled in opposite directions when the chief suspect in the case claims to have been framed for the murder by others within his department. With a conspiracy of silence permeating the hospital staff, it’s clear that there’s more to this case than meets the eye and only by penetrating the web of professional loyalties can the truth emerge. 

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, directed by M.T. Adler and written by Debbie O’Malley. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production.

Monday, 28 March 2011, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

In series four of LAW&ORDER: UK the critically acclaimed cast; Bradley Walsh, Jamie Bamber, Harriet Walter, Ben Daniels, Freema Agyeman and Bill Paterson tackle more emotionally gripping, unmissable stories. 

In Duty of Care, the fourth episode, when a fire at his home leads to the death of Ian Parnell – a teenager with severe disabilities – DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber) and DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) soon discover the fire was no accident. The investigation draws our cops in many different directions by a multitude of potential perpetrators capable of having started the fire including the victim himself. But the finger of blame soon points towards the last person one would have expected. 

Complications develop in prosecuting the defendant when Crown prosecutors James Steel (Ben Daniels) and Alesha Phillips (Freema Agyeman) find themselves up against ‘win-at-all-costs’ defence lawyer Dominic Peck (Oliver Dimsdale) whose outrageous ego threatens the fair outcome of the trial. With Peck constantly shifting the goalposts and misinforming his client, Megan Parnell (Beatie Edney) James finds himself acting as defence and prosecution at the same time. In an emotionally heart-rending climax, the consequences of Peck’s behaviour are brought to a crashing conclusion. Diana Quick is Judge Mary Hall. 

Talking about his character, Jamie Bamber says: “I really like playing Matt. I love the way he shoots from the hip, is enthusiastic about most things, acts first and thinks second and I love the honesty he displays. But most of all I love the relationship with Ronnie, Bradley Walsh’s character. Their differing energies compliment each other; they have an unstated respect for each other and a typical male uncommunicative type of friendship. 

“Most guys stick them in a restaurant across a table looking at each other and they’d find it awkward but stick them in a room, side by side with a football match on in the corner and they’ll have plenty of banter back and forth and even admit things about themselves and how they feel. Matt and Ronnie absolutely adore each other but would never talk about that relationship they just function well together.” 

Jamie explains what he likes about his role in the show: “Police work is dealing with the most horrendous pain in other people’s lives; pain, anger, guilt and grievances which they deal with on a daily basis. But to see that reflected in their own lives can sometimes be a bit soap operatic. I like the clean, dry functionality that the police have in our show. That is definitely a strength which is why the show works. Occasionally as an actor you get frustrated with not being able to flex your whole emotional range but I’ve learnt to love it. We come to work and life imitates art; Brad and I have a parlance and banter with the crew and with new actors just as Ronnie and Matt do together and with the people they meet every day. 

“I’m thrilled people like our partnership. It comes from the fact that Brad and I really enjoy being together. I really respect him and have learnt a lot from him. Of course it also comes from the writing and from the original American show. 

“What makes our partnership different is that we are equals. There are a lot of sidekicks in British TV; more established actors and younger sidekicks. They have been very clever with these two characters while they have differences they’re both the same rank, both carry the same weight in an episode and both see each other as equals. There are certain areas where Ronnie is undeniably senior and he carries an emotional weight. The victim’s pain is very much with Ronnie but equally the weight of anxiety for justice and the locomotion of scenes are with Matt. They do different things but first and foremost their characters have been well crafted, we used what’s there and luckily we clicked.” 

Speaking of the storyline in episode six where James Steel accuses Ronnie of concealing evidence, Jamie adds: “The two sides function as law and order but nevertheless it is ‘us and them’, there is a difference between the police and CPS. We are closely involved, all working to the same end but in different departments. There is always a slight frissant as though they are on foreign ground whenever they show up at station. So when James goes for Ronnie’s Achilles heel – the drinking that for years meant he wasn’t in control of life – Matt gets very territorial. Matt sees it like a good Catholic should; Ronnie’s done his penance and should be allowed to get on with his life. So his knee jerk reaction is ‘don’t have a go at him on his patch’. He stands up for his mate and quite rightly.” 

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, directed by Julian Holmes and written by Debbie O’Malley. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production.

Monday, 21 March 2011, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

In series four of LAW&ORDER: UK the critically acclaimed cast; Bradley Walsh, Jamie Bamber, Harriet Walter, Ben Daniels, Freema Agyeman and Bill Paterson tackle more emotionally gripping, unmissable stories. 

In the third episode, ID, when a pregnant junior doctor is found beaten to death in the car park of the hospital where she works, the prime suspect becomes her boyfriend, Joe Nash (Matthew McNulty), who cannot provide a solid alibi for where he was at the time of the killing. Mobile phone traces put him in the right place at approximately the right time but when his therapist Daniela Renzo (Nicola Walker) provides him with an alibi for that evening, DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber) and DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) begin to suspect they are having an affair. On arrest, a more harrowing truth emerges. 

What initially seems like a crime of passion soon unravels into a conspiracy involving senior level government officials. Risking their careers and defying the instruction of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Crown prosecutors James Steel (Ben Daniels) and Alesha Phillips (Freema Agyeman) must get to the bottom of this case before another life is destroyed. 

Bradley Walsh says: “This storyline is exceptional. I’m sure these things go on – people are given new identities while the rest of society goes about its business. Most people wouldn’t know who their neighbours are. This could really happen and I find it intriguing. You never know what goes on behind your neighbour’s net curtains… 

“Our show isn’t scared about taking on issues. There are plenty of dramas with more gore or violence. LAW&ORDER: UK isn’t like that but it shows the intensity and relationships between the perpetrator and police and judicial systems; that whole three way dynamic is quite incredible.” 

Bradley’s character, Ronnie Brooks, faces some tough accusations later in the series.

He says: “Ronnie believes everyone deserves a second chance. He knows people don’t usually wake up in the morning wanting to commit a crime but circumstances make it happen. He knows there is often a reason – be it family problems or drugs; all things that are symptomatic of today’s society. And he knows this because of is own failings as a younger man; the drinking and the failed marriages. 

“So when James Steel points the finger at him and suggests that maybe evidence went missing because he was drunk on the job it is a shameful for Ronnie to have to deal with. But what gives him strength is how his boss and his partner round on Steel and jump straight to Ronnie’s defence.” 

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, directed by Andy Goddard and written by Emilia di Girolamo. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production. 

Monday, 7 March 2011, 9:00PM – 10:00PM

In the new six-part series of LAW&ORDER:UK the critically acclaimed cast; Bradley Walsh, Jamie Bamber, Harriet Walter, Ben Daniels, Freema Agyeman and Bill Paterson tackle more emotionally gripping, unmissable stories. 

Series four sees DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) and DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber) investigating the death of an ex-Premier League Footballer and the witness intimidation which follows; the murder of a junior doctor which unravels into a conspiracy involving senior level government officials and the attempted murder of a high court judge. Meanwhile Senior Prosecutor James Steel (Ben Daniels) is accused of tampering with evidence and perverting the course of justice after an old case is reopened… 

A quality array of guest stars including Juliet Stevenson, Eddie Marsan, Tobias Menzies, Nicola Walker and Matthew McNulty will join the cast for series four. 

In Help, the first episode, ex-Premier League Footballer, Robbie Nichols, is beaten to death with a tyre iron on a London street one evening in what looks like a robbery gone wrong. Investigations lead DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber) and DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) to everyman, Mike Jones (Lorcan Cranitch). He was seen in the area at the time of the murder, has motive and, once arrested, has his DNA matched to the murder weapon. Proclaiming his innocence, Mike points the finger at a well known East End gangster who he says he saw at the scene of the crime on the evening in question. The police are at odds as to who to believe. 

Trying the accused is no mean feat for Senior Crown Prosecutor James Steel (Ben Daniels) who is up against the eccentric defence barrister Jason Peters (Eddie Marsan). Witness intimidation, false plea bargaining and corruption stand in the way of the truth but in the end, will the decency of one good samaritan be enough to finally put a murderer where they belong? Michael Cochrane is Judge Burchville. 

Freema Agyeman, who plays Alesha Phillips, believes this is the kind of storyline that makes LAW&ORDER: UK so pertinent to today’s society. 

“This episode is addressing the culture of fear that has come to the fore of late when bystanders have to face the possible consequences of doing the right thing. Everyone will have an opinion on this subject; we’ve all thought about and considered what we might do in a similar situation,” says Freema. 

“That is one of the things I love about this show that the stories are so relevant in 2011 even though they are based on much older episodes from the US. That and the fact that we tackle dramatic storylines which address completely different issues each week whether it be racism, conspiracy, mental health or corruption. 

“Some of these subjects will never be easy for me to deal with but paradoxically I always feel better after we have tackled a traumatic episode because I feel like I have contributed in a public forum; we are able to air it and discuss it. Apart from being a great hour’s entertainment, one of the functions of this show is to provoke and promote discussion and that all starts with the cast and crew.” 

Freema is very excited at the reception LAW&ORDER:UK has received in the US. 

She explains: “It’s the biggest relief that they like it! A real buzz has been generated over there about our show. I feel a real sense of pride on behalf of the show.” 

And Freema admits the US has shown an interest in her as a result. “My agent is getting requests so I might just give it a try later this year. I’ve never really had the confidence to go over and self promote before but it is something I have always wanted to try – although I’m fully expecting it to be a totally different world than I’m used to.” 

Having now filmed four series of the show, Freema says she feels ‘completely at home’ in the role of Alesha. And her new found self-possession has translated into her character as well. 

“I’m really comfortable in the role and have a real sense of pride on behalf of what all of us have achieved with the show. And I think as I get more comfortable playing Alesha so she gets more confident. 

“A director who we worked with back at the beginning and who recently returned for another episode told me he loved the headmistress in Alesha which he’d never seen before. I think she’s outgrown that rather Victorian child aspect of the role where she was there to listen and learn. There has been a change in her status and there is certainly plenty more room for her to grow which keeps me interested in the part. I can see the journey we’ve come on and the one ahead; I really enjoy playing Alesha.” 

This episode is produced by Richard Stokes, directed by James Strong and written by Terry Cafolla. The executive producers are Andrew Woodhead, Stephen Garrett and Jane Featherstone. Dick Wolf is creator and executive producer of the series. A Kudos/Wolf Films/NBC Universal Production.

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