Monster Moves

Tuesday 14th July 8.00pm

The titanic transportation series concludes. In the final instalment, disused paddle steamer the SS President is in deep trouble. Entrepreneur Sereta Barnes has an ambitious plan to turn the ship into a luxury hotel – but will the neglected vessel survive the 130km journey?

The SS President was once the flagship of the JS Line – a steamship company that operated luxury tours up and down the rivers of the American Midwest. Launched in 1924, she was in use for three quarters of a century, propelling musicians such as Louis Armstrong to fame on her voyages. However, the boat is now in serious trouble. After years of neglect, the damaged hull may not survive another winter freeze.

Some 130km inland, florist Sereta Barnes wants to change the fortunes of the abandoned pleasure boat. Her plan is to move the President from St Louis to her hometown of St Elmo and turn it into a lavish hotel. Sereta is heir to an oil fortune and is hoping that there is enough black gold left in the town to finance the £3million project. “We’re going to take the boat and give it a whole new life in Elmo,” she says, enthusiastically. “It’s going to improve the whole esteem of our community.”

The President is gigantic. As long as a football field and encompassing a cavernous ballroom, it weighs in at 4,000 tons. As St Elmo is landlocked, simply sailing the President to its new home is not a possibility. The mammoth task of moving the boat is entrusted to the head of Patterson Structural Movers, Jeremy Patterson. Jeremy discounts the possibility of moving the ship by rail, which could take years. The vessel is also too heavy to travel by road. Instead, Jeremy decides to use tugboats to move the President to a dry dock for dismantling, before moving it piece by piece to St Elmo.

With just ten weeks to dismantle and reassemble the President, Jeremy has to work fast. The first task is to use two tugboats to drag the ship to a dock in Alton. “I’m on top of the world!” Jeremy shouts to the well-wishers lining the riverbank. His good humour is short lived, however. To reach the dock the team must cross dangerously shallow water. Deckhand Tom Chrismer soon spots jumping fish, a sign the boat is running out of depth. Sure enough, the President grinds to a halt in the Mississippi mud, painfully close to the dock.

All attempts to move the President seem doomed to failure. Jeremy attempts to use a crane to move the boat, but the cables snap under the strain. “We’re so close, but so far away,” Jeremy sighs. His original plan was to haul the boat into the dock, drain it and use a crane to lift whole decks. With the craft still water-bound, the only way to dismantle it is to use a mobile crane to lift smaller pieces. Mooring fees of £500 per day mean it will be a much more expensive task to complete.

Jeremy removes a number of walls inside the ship to reveal the steel skeleton, in order to work out which beams he can cut. After a crash course in crane operation, Jeremy gets to work, first lifting a piece half the size of a tennis court. Sereta has arrived to watch the dismantling of the President. “Any project is going to be worth it in the end,” she says.

All goes well until the team reaches the Captain’s pilot house, which causes the crane to buckle. Jeremy decides to drop the house onto the deck below. He then sets up steel beams and slides the house towards the dock using his favourite lubricant – bananas. “We’re hoping the bananas will come through for us!” he announces. Luckily the pilot house is successfully moved on to dry land, and the team begins shipping the loads to Elmo.

However, Jeremy has a bigger challenge to face – the thick, steel walls of the 2,000-ton hull. Can he pull the hull out of the water? Or could this be the death of the President?

Tuesday 7th July 8.00pm

The titanic transportation series continues. In this week’s instalment, former heart surgeon Jack Sternlieb entrusts his custom-built yacht, the Star Sapphire, to a team of maritime movers. But with 22 boats to transport, can the Yacht Express make it across the Atlantic without damaging its precious cargo?

When he retired, millionaire heart surgeon Jack Sternlieb channelled £7million of his fortune into his new yacht, the Star Sapphire. His pride and joy, the boat boasts two bars, a gym, a jacuzzi and even a garage. After some time sailing around the Mediterranean coast, Jack has decided to go home to Florida – but with the Sapphire weighing in at 200 tons, this floating palace is going to be tough to move. “Some sailors like harrowing experiences – I like it smooth!” Jack laughs.

In search of ways to move the Sapphire safely, Jack visits the Monaco Boat Show for inspiration. Tieke Sprenger, loading master for Dockwise Yacht Transport, discusses the possible ways to move the Sapphire. Although it is feasible to move yachts by plane or freighter, the size of the Sapphire makes both of these options risky. Instead, Jack books a place on a semi-submersible yacht carrier, the Yacht Express. Dockwise Yacht Transport’s president Clemens van der Werf is very proud of his company’s newest vessel. “This is a special year for us, because this is the first year we have had our Yacht Express in service,” he says.

The Yacht Express is already booked to carry 21 other yachts from Genoa to the United States, so the Sapphire must move fast to make it to the ship in time. With yachts valuing $160million, Tieke has her work cut out to fit the boats on board. If she packs them too tightly they will bang into each other – but if she packs them too loosely they will not fit on board. The weight must also be distributed evenly to avoid loading stress.

As the loading deadline nears, Tieke prepares the ships for boarding in Genoa. To prevent damage to the boats, the Yacht Express is submerged by blasting out water from the ballast tanks. The crew must then build hull cradles for each yacht before the deck is flooded. “I can’t be there at every point,” Tieke tells the nervous crew, “I need your eyes for me.”

As the ship submerges, the volume of sea water poses a threat to the vessel’s stability. While the water floods onto the deck, Captain Valeriy Yakovlyer monitors the flow of water to make sure the ship submerges evenly. “The ship should be upright all the time. We are continuously watching the trim of the vessel,” he says. It takes nine hours for the ship to sink 13 metres, which should be enough to stop the vessels scraping the deck with their keels.

As the yachts are loaded, the operation hits a snag – the Star Sapphire is denied access to the port. “You start to lose patience after a while with pencil- pushers,” fumes the Sapphire’s captain, Peter Charles. The yachts can only be loaded when the sea is calm. As the water becomes more choppy, the Sapphire’s delay jeopardises departure. However, the Sapphire is finally cleared to enter the port and Tieke gets to work loading the remaining nine vessels. After a sticky moment when the swell causes the yachts to shift around, the water is drained and the Yacht Express sets sail.

Jack is delighted with the loading of the Sapphire. “They’ve done an incredible job of loading the boat,” he enthuses. But as the Express enters the Atlantic, a storm is brewing. Around 500 miles south of the boat’s position, hurricane Omar makes its presence felt. Can the Yacht Express plot a course away from the storm before it derails the whole operation?

The mammoth moving series continues. In this week’s instalment, the entire town of Malartic in Quebec is uprooted to make space for a new gold mine. Elsewhere, North Carolina’s oldest mansions are also on the move.

Malartic is one of Quebec’s oldest gold towns. In 1926, exploratory drilling found five million ounces of gold, leading to a massive boom. However, by 1965 the gold had run out and production ground to a halt. Things looked bleak for the town until geologists investigated the site in 2005 and discovered untapped gold worth £3billion was sitting underneath the church. To reach the gold, 150 houses must be moved to a new location.

Because of the size of the project, Peter Tobin, head of Heneault and Gosselin Structural Movers, had to hire a whole new team. “This is something you can’t learn in school. We basically had to start up a whole academy of house movers,” he says. Before starting work on the real job, the team practises the procedure on a mock-up of one of the houses. With the price of gold rocketing, they are under pressure to move the houses to a tight schedule.

When the day of the move finally arrives, Malartic resident Sean Rose has mixed feelings about the relocation, particularly when he observes the way the team handles his home. “I thought they were going to leave the balcony and the porch. I can’t believe what’s going on here!” he exclaims. In moves of this kind, hydraulic jacks are used to lift the houses off the ground. For this project, the developers have made jacks that fit under all four corners of the frame, halving the time it takes to raise the houses from their foundations.

Just as the Rose house looks set to move to its new location, the Department of Transport delivers some bad news. Concerned by the possibility of a crash, officials are insisting that Tobin’s team fits air brakes onto the vehicles used in the move, and shifts just one house at a time. The recruits must move three houses every two days in order to keep to their schedule. Is the project in jeopardy before it has even begun?

Elsewhere, a very different project is taking place in Raleigh, North Carolina. A new development of 500 homes is planned, threatening eight historic mansions built in 1855 to house state officials. Unwilling to sacrifice North Carolina’s heritage, the state plans to move the mansions to a new site and sell them as private homes. Architect Steve Shuster has been called in to find a way to preserve the dwellings. “The Merriman-Wynne house is one of the most historic homes in the Blount Street Project. Much of the richest history occurred in this house,” he says.

Mike Blake, head of the Blake Moving Company, decides it would be best to avoid dismantling the houses. As he makes plans to move the 300-ton Merriman-Wynne house, Mike worries the chimneys may be too brittle to survive and sends new recruit Jeb up on a lift to dismantle the brickwork. The rookie is unhappy with his task, however. “I’m not getting back on the lift. It wobbles too much,” he insists, leaving his boss to finish the job himself.

The Merriman-Wynne house is so heavy Mike is also forced to attach a bulldozer for extra pulling power. With the mansion sinking into the soft soil, it takes two hours to haul the property to the roadside. Just as the mansion reaches the curb, disaster strikes – one of the tyres on the truck blows. With rush hour about to begin, can Mike’s team replace the tyre in time? And what does this hitch mean for the removal of the other mansions?

In a brand new series of ‘Monster Moves’, daring teams of structural engineers execute some of the most daunting relocations ever attempted. In the first instalment, the entire town of Malartic in Quebec is uprooted to make space for a new gold mine. Elsewhere, North Carolina’s oldest mansions are also on the move.

Malartic is one of Quebec’s oldest gold towns. In 1926, exploratory drilling found five million ounces of gold, leading to a massive boom. However, by 1965 the gold had run out and production ground to a halt. Things looked bleak for the town until geologists investigated the site in 2005 and discovered untapped gold worth £3billion was sitting underneath the church. To reach the gold, 150 houses must be moved to a new location.

Because of the size of the project, Peter Tobin, head of Heneault and Gosselin Structural Movers, had to hire a whole new team. “This is something you can’t learn in school. We basically had to start up a whole academy of house movers,” he says. Before starting work on the real job, the team practises the procedure on a mock-up of one of the houses. With the price of gold rocketing, they are under pressure to move the houses to a tight schedule.

When the day of the move finally arrives, Malartic resident Sean Rose has mixed feelings about the relocation, particularly when he observes the way the team handles his home. “I thought they were going to leave the balcony and the porch. I can’t believe what’s going on here!” he exclaims. In moves of this kind, hydraulic jacks are used to lift the houses off the ground. For this project, the developers have made jacks that fit under all four corners of the frame, halving the time it takes to raise the houses from their foundations.

Just as the Rose house looks set to move to its new location, the Department of Transport delivers some bad news. Concerned by the possibility of a crash, officials are insisting that Tobin’s team fits air brakes onto the vehicles used in the move, and shifts just one house at a time. The recruits must move three houses every two days in order to keep to their schedule. Is the project in jeopardy before it has even begun?

Elsewhere, a very different project is taking place in Raleigh, North Carolina. A new development of 500 homes is planned, threatening eight historic mansions built in 1855 to house state officials. Unwilling to sacrifice North Carolina’s heritage, the state plans to move the mansions to a new site and sell them as private homes. Architect Steve Shuster has been called in to find a way to preserve the dwellings. “The Merriman-Wynne house is one of the most historic homes in the Blount Street Project. Much of the richest history occurred in this house,” he says.

Mike Blake, head of the Blake Moving Company, decides it would be best to avoid dismantling the houses. As he makes plans to move the 300-ton Merriman-Wynne house, Mike worries the chimneys may be too brittle to survive and sends new recruit Jeb up on a lift to dismantle the brickwork. The rookie is unhappy with his task, however. “I’m not getting back on the lift. It wobbles too much,” he insists, leaving his boss to finish the job himself.

The Merriman-Wynne house is so heavy Mike is also forced to attach a bulldozer for extra pulling power. With the mansion sinking into the soft soil, it takes two hours to haul the property to the roadside. Just as the mansion reaches the curb, disaster strikes – one of the tyres on the truck blows. With rush hour about to begin, can Mike’s team replace the tyre in time? And what does this hitch mean for the removal of the other mansions?

Moving can be stressful, but transporting an entire
house in one piece sounds almost impossible.
This is the kind of daunting challenge facing teams
of structural movers in the third series of Monster
Moves, which features some of the most daring
relocation projects ever undertaken. This week’s
show follows two teams of engineers as they
attempt to move two enormous homes to new
locations. In Seattle, a pair of newlyweds want to
move a period house into the city. And in Texas, a
building collector dreams of transporting a stone
mansion for his mother.
This week’s programme charts the progress of two teams of movers who are determined to realise the dreams of some demanding customers. In Seattle, newlyweds Tawny and Ian Wilson want to relocate a period house across land and sea and set it down in the middle of the city. Aside from their love for this classical building, the couple have a practical reason for embarking on such an extravagant operation. Ian is six-feetnine- inches tall, and no house in the town has ceilings high enough to accommodate him comfortably. Can Canadian mover Jeremy Nickel deliver it to their garden intact?
Thousands of miles away in Texas, another man has dreams of providing his mother with the ultimate present: a vintage home that has been uprooted from its original setting and relocated to form part of a historical village. Building collector Adam Wooley has assembled a ‘town that time forgot’ consisting of reconstructed buildings from the early 1900s. He now wants his mother to live close by in a beautiful 200-tonne stone mansion.
A team of movers and engineers is set the enormous challenge of delivering this huge present – all the while dodging cacti and rattlesnakes on the dusty Great Plains of Texas.
And in an astonishing closing scene, Adam wraps up the relocated building in a giant red bow to present to his mother as a surprise. What will she make of this extraordinary gift?

Moving can be stressful, but transporting an entire
house in one piece sounds almost impossible.
This is the kind of daunting challenge facing teams
of structural movers in the third series of Monster
Moves, which features some of the most daring
relocation projects ever undertaken. This week’s
show follows two teams of engineers as they each
attempt to move enormous historic structures to
new homes. In Iowa, a huge hall is dragged across
a city; and in Canada, an old plane has to be
moved to a museum.
In this week’s Monster Moves, two teams of
movers attempt to haul two huge historic items to
new locations. In Des Moines, Iowa, house hauler
Jeremy Patterson attempts to relocate the largest
structure to be shifted in the world this year – the
immense 700-tonne Murillo Hall. This enormous
building needs to be hauled a distance of one
kilometre – right through the middle of bustling Des Moines city.
Built in 1903, the Murillo is one of the last remaining historic structures in the city, but it stands on a prime site destined for redevelopment.
Local property developer Phil Kaiser stepped in to buy the hall and plans to move it to one of his own sites across the city. “The Murillo is just a beautiful example of what our architecture was like at the turn of the century. There’s not many buildings like this around, and we need to preserve something like this,” says Phil.
Kaiser calls in Jeremy Patterson to haul the hall across the city at a cost of £200,000. But Jeremy faces an immense challenge. The walls of the building are made from four layers of solid – but brittle – masonry; the streets are narrow and bustling with traffic; and winter is fast approaching.
“It went from a tough project to a headache of a project real fast,” says Jeremy. The team must protect the immensely heavy structure from crippling the roads; while also devising a way to stop the walls from cracking as they are dragged over all manner of bumps and dips. Will the unwieldy four-storey structure survive the treacherous trek across town intact?
This week’s programme also follows the delicate operation to dismantle and move a vintage Canadian aircraft – a Lockheed Lodestar. First built in 1941, these planes saw service in the golden age of aviation. During World War II, they became reliable workhorses for transporting critical supplies to troops; and during peacetime, they
were fitted out to transport VIPs and dignitaries all over the world. This particular Lodestar has carried some of Canada’s most important passengers, including Prime Minister St Laurent, making it an iconic piece of Canadian aviation history.
The aircraft sits at the entrance to Langley Airport in British Columbia, but is in desperate need of restoration. To safeguard this legend of the skies, a team of aviation enthusiasts – led by former Lodestar Captain Bill Marr – organises a rescue mission to move and restore the plane for display 60 kilometres away at the Canadian Museum of Flight.
Moving the plane to its new home proves a big challenge. The aircraft no longer flies, but is too large to haul on the back of a truck in a single piece. Bill must therefore form a team to dismantle the wing and tail sections of the aircraft before hoisting the fragile fuselage of the Lodestar onto a specially rigged truck for transport. It is a precarious and time-consuming operation. “It’s worse than picking up an egg,” says lead mover Ron Bakker. “It’s like picking up a rotten egg!”
Ron and his crew negotiate tight turns, low bridges, city traffic and the daunting Trans- Canada highway in the middle of the night to reach the Lodestar’s final destination. Once there, the craft must then be painstakingly reassembled and restored.

Moving can be stressful, but transporting an entire
house in one piece sounds almost impossible.
This is the kind of daunting challenge facing teams
of structural movers in the third series of Monster
Moves, which features some of the most daring
relocation projects ever undertaken. This week’s
show follows two teams of engineers as they each
attempt to move enormous historic structures to
new homes. In Iowa, a huge hall is dragged across
a city; and in Canada, an old plane has to be
moved to a museum.
In this week’s Monster Moves, two teams of
movers attempt to haul two huge historic items to
new locations. In Des Moines, Iowa, house hauler
Jeremy Patterson attempts to relocate the largest
structure to be shifted in the world this year – the
immense 700-tonne Murillo Hall. This enormous
building needs to be hauled a distance of one
kilometre – right through the middle of bustling Des
Moines city.
Built in 1903, the Murillo is one of the last remaining historic structures in the city, but it stands on a prime site destined for redevelopment.
Local property developer Phil Kaiser stepped in to buy the hall and plans to move it to one of his own sites across the city. “The Murillo is just a beautiful example of what our architecture was like at the turn of the century. There’s not many buildings like this around, and we need to preserve something like this,” says Phil.
Kaiser calls in Jeremy Patterson to haul the hall across the city at a cost of £200,000. But Jeremy faces an immense challenge. The walls of the building are made from four layers of solid – but brittle – masonry; the streets are narrow and bustling with traffic; and winter is fast approaching.
“It went from a tough project to a headache of a project real fast,” says Jeremy. The team must protect the immensely heavy structure from crippling the roads; while also devising a way to stop the walls from cracking while they are dragged over bumps and dips in the road. Will the unwieldy four-storey structure survive the treacherous trek across town intact?
This week’s programme also follows the delicate operation to dismantle and move a vintage Canadian aircraft – a Lockheed Lodestar. First built in 1941, these planes saw service in the golden age of aviation. During World War II, they became reliable workhorses for transporting critical supplies to troops; and during peacetime, they were fitted out to transport VIPs and dignitaries all over the world. This particular Lodestar has carried some of Canada’s most important passengers, including Prime Minister St Laurent, making it an iconic piece of Canadian aviation history.
The aircraft sits at the entrance to Langley Airport in British Columbia, but is in desperate need of restoration. To safeguard this legend of the skies, a team of aviation enthusiasts – led by former Lodestar Captain Bill Marr – organises a rescue mission to move and restore the plane for display 60 kilometres away at the Canadian Museum of Flight.
Moving the plane to its new home proves a big challenge. The aircraft no longer flies, but is too large to haul on the back of a truck in a single piece. Bill must therefore form a team to dismantle the wing and tail sections of the aircraft before hoisting the fragile fuselage of the Lodestar onto a specially rigged truck for transport. It is a precarious and time-consuming operation. “It’s worse than picking up an egg,” says lead mover Ron Bakker. “It’s like picking up a rotten egg!”
Ron and his crew negotiate tight turns, low bridges, city traffic and the daunting Trans- Canada highway in the middle of the night to reach the Lodestar’s final destination. Once there, the craft must then be painstakingly reassembled and restored.

Moving house can be stressful, but transporting an entire house in one piece sounds almost impossible. This is the kind of daunting challenge facing teams of structural movers in the third series of Monster Moves, which features some of the most daring relocation projects ever undertaken. In this instalment, the challenge is to transport a vintage steam locomotive 10,000 km across two continents.

This week, a team of British engineers led by expert heavy hauler and steam enthusiast Andrew Goodman heads to Bloemfontein in South Africa on a rescue mission. Their quarry is the 15F 3007 – a classic, 100-tonne steam locomotive made over 60 years ago in Glasgow. In the first half of the 20th century, the North British Locomotive Company built locomotives and shipped them all over the world –including some 2,000 to South Africa.

Today, very few of these vast machines remain, and the Glasgow Transport Museum wants one back. “It’s really important to take one home,” says Scottish engineer Jim Mitchell. However, moving a 15-metre locomotive nearly 10,000 km across land and sea is no easy task.

For the first leg of the journey –a 650 km trip across South African bush to Durban on the east coast –Andrew has a number of choices about how best to procede. He could attempt to move the vehicle using its own steam power, but the boilers are so old they could explode. He could use another engine to shunt the 15F along existing tracks, but it is difficult and expensive to secure a route. Another option would be to dismantle the locomotove and transport it to Scotland piece by piece, but this is incredibly time-consuming. In the end, Andrew decides to transport the locomotove by road using a huge, six-axle lorry.

But before the lorry can even leave the depot, disaster strikes –the local transport police make an unexpected visit and inform Andrew that he cannot proceed because the trailer is not big enough. Without a larger lorry at his disposal, Andrew is forced to reconsider his plans.

Turning his attention back to the railway, Andrew visits the local rail network and manages to borrow a diesel engine and secure a route. But before the 15F can start its journey, it must undergo a complete overhaul. Having not moved for over 20 years, the locomotive needs to be fully greased; its cab needs to be reinforced; a specialist driver must be flown in; and extra carriages need to be attached to provide sufficient braking power. “All for the love of steam!” exclaims Andrew.

It takes hours of work, but the 15F eventually starts moving. However, progress is slow and arduous, since every 25 km, the team stops the locomotive to lubricate its wheels. To make up for lost time, they work through the freezing-cold night and must build makeshift heaters in the cab using oil drums and wood. “We might survive now,” jokes Andrew. “We might be able to keep hypothermia at bay!”
After two days and nights, the 15F reaches Durban, but there are more problems ahead. A broken diesel, clogged tracks and an abandoned truck mean that it takes the team the best part of another day to shift the locomotive 800 metres to the dockside. “It’s absolutely incredible,” says a frustrated Andrew. Once it finally arrives at the water’s edge, it takes 20 people six hours to get the 15F onto the ship that will take it to Hamburg.

At Hamburg, Andrew and the team wait anxiously to see if the locomotive has survived its 40-day voyage through rough seas, before overseeing its transfer to another vessel that will take it to Britain. The final leg of the 15F’s epic expedition sees it crawling up the British motorways on the back of a huge lorry, before it eventually arrives back in Glasgow for the first time in 60 years. “That’s got to be the journey of a lifetime,” says an emotional Andrew.

Tuesday 18th March at 8pm on five

Moving house can be stressful, but transporting an entire house in one piece sounds almost impossible. This is the kind of daunting challenge facing teams of structural movers in the third series of Monster Moves, which features some of the most daring relocation projects ever attempted. This week, an iconic lighthouse must be shifted before it crumbles into the Atlantic Ocean. And in Sweden, an entire mining town needs to be relocated or it will be swallowed up by a mammoth sinkhole.

This season of Monster Moves follows teams of expert movers as they haul supersize structures on road, rail, sea and air journeys across Britain, America, Canada, South Africa, Egypt, Sweden and America. This year, the structures are bigger, the routes are longer and riskier –and the stakes for the haulers and owners are much higher. This week’s episode shows how Mother Nature can wreak havoc on man-made structures and force movers to race against time.

On America’s east coast, the stormy conditions that regularly batter Nantucket Island have put the towering Sankaty Head Lighthouse at risk of plunging down a crumbling cliff. Having been a beacon to Massachusetts seamen for over 150 years, the lighthouse is still in use today. The locals carry great affection for Sankaty, one woman calling it a “touchstone”. With one more bad storm having the potential to spell the end for the tower, the township band together and raise $4 million to fund the relocation project.

Standing tall at 90 feet and weighing in at 500 tons, the lighthouse proves to be a massive job for Expert House Movers. Safe ground lies 400 feet away, and the movers identify three possible options to get from A to B. Using computer-generated images, the film demonstrates in detail how each method will work. But with hurricane season brewing, the team will need to get things rolling quickly.

Meanwhile, the colossal task of moving an entire town in Sweden lies in the hands of 26-year-old house-mover Andreas Martensson.

Malmberget, in the Arctic Circle, was founded on is iron ore mines in the late 19th century. Now the
very industry that the town was built on threatens to consume it for good. In 1985, one of the several
mine shafts collapsed, causing a sink hole to develop on the outskirts of town. Since then, the hole has been a growing concern for the town’s residents. Mining must continue for the sake of Malmberget’s prosperity, so the people are left with no choice but to uproot the 462 homes to more stable foundations five miles away.

With the Arctic winter looming, the movers must contend with short daylight hours and plummeting temperatures to get the job done, street by street. Before they can even make a start, an unexpected development threatens to hamper the project. But nothing is too difficult for Martensson, and on the day of the first move, the locals turn out in droves to witness the surreal sight of a two-ton house inching along at a snail’s pace down the main street.

Saturday 8 – Friday 14 March on Five

Moving house can be stressful, but transporting the entire house in one piece without it falling apart is a logistical nightmare. This is the kind of daunting challenge facing teams of structural movers in the third series of Monster Moves, which returns with some of the most daring relocation projects ever attempted. The series begins with a special programme revealing how 20 Egyptian temples were rescued from the rising waters of the River Nile in the 1960s.

This season of Monster Moves follows teams of expert movers as they haul supersize structures on road, rail, sea and air journeys across Britain, America, Canada, South Africa, Egypt, Sweden and America. This year, the structures are bigger, the routes are longer and riskier –and the stakes for the haulers and owners are much higher. The series begins tonight with a special programme marking the 40th anniversary of the biggest Monster Move ever attempted – the transportation of 20 Egyptian temples away from the rising Nile.

The programme recounts how engineers cut the precious twin temples of Abu Simbel into over 1,000 massive blocks, before moving them to higher ground and reassembling them at their new location. Throughout the film, the drama of this incredible task is conveyed using stunning CGI animation, rare colour archive film, interviews with members of the original move team and a live-action practical demonstration on a specially carved replica of Ramasses.

Also in the programme, British Royal Navy diver Ed Thompson explains how flooded monuments on the Island of Philae were rescued by dismantling them underwater and floating them to the surface. And Egyptian engineers reveal the unique techniques they devised to move the 900-ton temple of Amada two miles across the Egyptian desert on rail tracks.

Tuesday 4th March at 8:00pm on five

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