Police Camera Action

Thursday, 19 August 2010, 9:00PM – 10:00PM on ITV1

When Lorries Become Lethal

There are over 400,000 lorries on British roads and when they crash, their sheer size can cause devastation. ‘When Lorries Become Lethal’ looks at why HGV’s are one of the biggest killers on our roads and what can be done to address the problem.

Strict regulations on working hours govern life as a lorry driver. A driver is not allowed more than 10 hours on the road and must have two 45 minute breaks in this time. To make sure they stick to the rules, a tachograph is installed in the lorry and records every minute that a driver is on the road. Unfortunately, it is easy to tamper with the tachograph in order to drive longer hours, illegally.

Gethin joins the police on patrol in Birmingham as they try to reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths that occur on the motorways. Gethin witnesses PC Nairn stop a driver after his erratic driving raises suspicions. At first the driver is adamant he has done nothing wrong and claims his boss drove the first part of the journey. However, after extensive questioning from PC Nairn he finally admits to fiddling his tachograph and produces a second tachograph he has hidden in the cab.

Gethin is impressed with PC Nairn: “Amazing work by Angus. He was right to be sceptical. All of a sudden the lorry driver produced the missing tachograph from behind the seat. He’s now in a lot of trouble.”

Gethin then heads to a lorry stop where he meets two truckers to find out why they are willing to take risks when the consequences can be so severe. Shaun Graham was a trucker for eight years and admits he fiddled his tachograph when driving in Britain and Europe.

Shaun says: “I used to be told to leave the depot on a Sunday afternoon in Yorkshire and be in Vienna for Monday night. You’d have to drive down to Dover on your boss’s tachograph. Then put your own in and drive as far as you possibly could. You’re probably driving a good 15 to 20 hours but you know you can’t pull over and have a rest because your boss is going be on phone, wanting to know why you’ve stopped.”

Walla Longden has been driving lorries for over 30 years but now only works part-time. He claims he was often asked to drive beyond his legal hours.

Walla says: “I stopped doing it and I would not, under any circumstances whatsoever, go over my time. And so I practically became unemployable.”

Gethin is shocked to hear Walla’s story: “So you’re basically saying you’d become unemployable because you weren’t able to do the hours other people were doing because they were fiddling their tachos? That’s outrageous.”

Having taken his HGV test, Gethin is keen to find out how a sleep deprived lorry driver’s schedule will affect his own body. He visits the Transport Research Centre in Wokingham to take two driving tests in a simulator. During the first test, Gethin is fully alert and drives well, keeping to the lanes and driving smoothly.

He then spends the night sleeping in the cab of a lorry at a busy truck stop. Legally, drivers must rest for a minimum of nine hours before their next shift begins. Many start in the early hours when the traffic is lightest. Gethin plans to get up at 4am but struggles to fall asleep until midnight. After just four hours sleep, which isn’t unusual for some lorry drivers, he is back on the road to drive for two and a half hours.

Back at the research centre, his second driving test proves very different from the first.

Dr Mark Chattington says:”Gethin’s having a little bit of trouble at this point. He’s quite regularly crossing the white line and running onto the hard shoulder.”

Dr Chattington is looking to see if Gethin experiences a micro sleep during his test. A micro sleep is a brief period of inattention where you are not fully asleep but neither are you awake. You experience it for a couple of seconds but your body then wakes you back up again.

Soon, Gethin collides with a road user and the simulation immediately stops. During the video playback of his simulation he is amazed to see his eyes closed for brief periods when driving.

Dr Chattington then delivers the shocking news that Gethin was asleep for a total of 18 seconds when his micro sleeps are added up.

Professor Jim Horne, one of the world’s leading sleep experts, from the Loughborough Sleep Research Centre says, incredibly, Gethin’s limited four hours sleep is within the law.

Professer Horne says: “Although legally within a 24 hour period drivers must have at least nine hours continuous rest, there’s no stipulation that this rest has to be actual sleep itself. Rest is no substitute for sleep. Particularly if there’s a very noisy and cold cab environment.”

The programme covers the case of lorry driver David Walsh who caused a crash on the M61 near Manchester in 2006, during the evening rush hour. He fell asleep at the wheel and caused a devastating crash as his vehicle drifted onto the hard shoulder and then smashed into the central reservation.

Gethin meets Roger Bailey whose life has been destroyed by the accident. He was left with long term injuries and has not worked since.

Roger says: “I broke my leg in a few places. My shoulder, my elbow was broken and dislocated, my arm, my ribs were broken. Basically I was broken in two and crushed down my right-hand side.”

Also on the motorway that night was Lisa Dootson’s fiancé. Lisa remembers the events of that evening: “By half past seven he hadn’t arrived home, so I was starting to get a bit nervous wondering where he was. As I’m stood in the window waiting, a police car arrived. The police officer didn’t actually speak to me, he looked at me. I just said, ‘Do I have to expect the worst?’ And then he said, ‘Yes.’ I just fell to the floor.”

Despite an overall decline, there are still thousands of accidents involving lorries every year. Manufacturers are now addressing the issue and Gethin test drives a new truck which has an
in-cab alarm to warn sleepy or inattentive drivers when they are too close to another vehicle.

He also goes on patrol with Essex Police. PC Harry Sexton and his team are on the look-out for un-roadworthy trucks and drivers with false documentation. Gethin asks PC Sexton how many issues come to light when drivers are stopped.

PC Sexton replies: “On average, about 20 percent have something wrong with them. Either mechanical, driver’s hours or document offences. We quite often get drivers come in. They know we’re here and they ask us to give them a prohibition because their boss won’t let them stop. They’ve got defective vehicles and their bosses won’t fix them.”

Finally, Gethin also finds out how lorry drivers themselves have become victims. Police Camera Action hears shocking stories of lorry drivers being gassed and threatened with knives before thieves steal their cargo.

Wednesday, 18 August 2010, 9:00PM – 10:00PM on ITV1

When Lorries Become Lethal

There are over 400,000 lorries on British roads and when they crash, their sheer size can cause devastation. ‘When Lorries Become Lethal’ looks at why HGV’s are one of the biggest killers on our roads and what can be done to address the problem.

Strict regulations on working hours govern life as a lorry driver. A driver is not allowed more than 10 hours on the road and must have two 45 minute breaks in this time. To make sure they stick to the rules, a tachograph is installed in the lorry and records every minute that a driver is on the road. Unfortunately, it is easy to tamper with the tachograph in order to drive longer hours, illegally.

Gethin joins the police on patrol in Birmingham as they try to reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths that occur on the motorways. Gethin witnesses PC Nairn stop a driver after his erratic driving raises suspicions. At first the driver is adamant he has done nothing wrong and claims his boss drove the first part of the journey. However, after extensive questioning from PC Nairn he finally admits to fiddling his tachograph and produces a second tachograph he has hidden in the cab.

Gethin is impressed with PC Nairn: “Amazing work by Angus. He was right to be sceptical. All of a sudden the lorry driver produced the missing tachograph from behind the seat. He’s now in a lot of trouble.”

Gethin then heads to a lorry stop where he meets two truckers to find out why they are willing to take risks when the consequences can be so severe. Shaun Graham was a trucker for eight years and admits he fiddled his tachograph when driving in Britain and Europe.

Shaun says: “I used to be told to leave the depot on a Sunday afternoon in Yorkshire and be in Vienna for Monday night. You’d have to drive down to Dover on your boss’s tachograph. Then put your own in and drive as far as you possibly could. You’re probably driving a good 15 to 20 hours but you know you can’t pull over and have a rest because your boss is going be on phone, wanting to know why you’ve stopped.”

Walla Longden has been driving lorries for over 30 years but now only works part-time. He claims he was often asked to drive beyond his legal hours.

Walla says: “I stopped doing it and I would not, under any circumstances whatsoever, go over my time. And so I practically became unemployable.”

Gethin is shocked to hear Walla’s story: “So you’re basically saying you’d become unemployable because you weren’t able to do the hours other people were doing because they were fiddling their tachos? That’s outrageous.”

Having taken his HGV test, Gethin is keen to find out how a sleep deprived lorry driver’s schedule will affect his own body. He visits the Transport Research Centre in Wokingham to take two driving tests in a simulator. During the first test, Gethin is fully alert and drives well, keeping to the lanes and driving smoothly.

He then spends the night sleeping in the cab of a lorry at a busy truck stop. Legally, drivers must rest for a minimum of nine hours before their next shift begins. Many start in the early hours when the traffic is lightest. Gethin plans to get up at 4am but struggles to fall asleep until midnight. After just four hours sleep, which isn’t unusual for some lorry drivers, he is back on the road to drive for two and a half hours.

Back at the research centre, his second driving test proves very different from the first.

Dr Mark Chattington says:”Gethin’s having a little bit of trouble at this point. He’s quite regularly crossing the white line and running onto the hard shoulder.”

Dr Chattington is looking to see if Gethin experiences a micro sleep during his test. A micro sleep is a brief period of inattention where you are not fully asleep but neither are you awake. You experience it for a couple of seconds but your body then wakes you back up again.

Soon, Gethin collides with a road user and the simulation immediately stops. During the video playback of his simulation he is amazed to see his eyes closed for brief periods when driving.

Dr Chattington then delivers the shocking news that Gethin was asleep for a total of 18 seconds when his micro sleeps are added up.

Professor Jim Horne, one of the world’s leading sleep experts, from the Loughborough Sleep Research Centre says, incredibly, Gethin’s limited four hours sleep is within the law.

Professer Horne says: “Although legally within a 24 hour period drivers must have at least nine hours continuous rest, there’s no stipulation that this rest has to be actual sleep itself. Rest is no substitute for sleep. Particularly if there’s a very noisy and cold cab environment.”

The programme covers the case of lorry driver David Walsh who caused a crash on the M61 near Manchester in 2006, during the evening rush hour. He fell asleep at the wheel and caused a devastating crash as his vehicle drifted onto the hard shoulder and then smashed into the central reservation.

Gethin meets Roger Bailey whose life has been destroyed by the accident. He was left with long term injuries and has not worked since.

Roger says: “I broke my leg in a few places. My shoulder, my elbow was broken and dislocated, my arm, my ribs were broken. Basically I was broken in two and crushed down my right-hand side.”

Also on the motorway that night was Lisa Dootson’s fiancé. Lisa remembers the events of that evening: “By half past seven he hadn’t arrived home, so I was starting to get a bit nervous wondering where he was. As I’m stood in the window waiting, a police car arrived. The police officer didn’t actually speak to me, he looked at me. I just said, ‘Do I have to expect the worst?’ And then he said, ‘Yes.’ I just fell to the floor.”

Despite an overall decline, there are still thousands of accidents involving lorries every year. Manufacturers are now addressing the issue and Gethin test drives a new truck which has an
in-cab alarm to warn sleepy or inattentive drivers when they are too close to another vehicle.

He also goes on patrol with Essex Police. PC Harry Sexton and his team are on the look-out for un-roadworthy trucks and drivers with false documentation. Gethin asks PC Sexton how many issues come to light when drivers are stopped.

PC Sexton replies: “On average, about 20 percent have something wrong with them. Either mechanical, driver’s hours or document offences. We quite often get drivers come in. They know we’re here and they ask us to give them a prohibition because their boss won’t let them stop. They’ve got defective vehicles and their bosses won’t fix them.”

Finally, Gethin also finds out how lorry drivers themselves have become victims. Police Camera Action hears shocking stories of lorry drivers being gassed and threatened with knives before thieves steal their cargo.

Thursday, 12 August 2010, 9:00PM – 10:00PM on ITV1

Episode Three: Distracted, Dangerous and Dumb.

Speaking on a mobile phone, texting, using a sat nav, eating and applying make-up are bad habits that many drivers commit on a regular basis. But everyday actions like these, done while driving, can turn ordinary people into criminals in a split second. Distracted driving contributes to thousands of accidents a year. Police, Camera Action investigates why nearly 40 per cent of drivers still take the risk.

The programme shows adrenalin-fuelled footage, including a girl talking on a mobile phone who completely loses control at the wheel, a driver reading a newspaper while driving and a bus driver, so engrossed in reading a text, that he fails to see the traffic ahead has stopped and crashes.

Gethin Jones begins his investigation into distracted driving with a confession. He says: “A couple of years ago I took a phone-call that I thought was important as I was driving home. But the police spotted me and I got three points and a £60 fine. The thing is, I knew it was wrong but I didn’t think it was that dangerous.”

The programme follows Gethin as he explores the killer habits of ordinary drivers. He goes on patrol for two days with the Central Motorway Police Group who cover 450 miles of the country’s busiest motorways. In just one morning with the PC Steve Rounds, Gethin sees him issue 11 people with fines and points for using their mobile phones.

Gethin then meets four drivers who admit to being distracted while driving. Cameras are placed in their cars to record their everyday driving behaviour and the results are eye-opening. Twenty-six year old engineer Jamie regularly texts behind the wheel as he drives around the country for work. Jasmine, a 21 year old student, applies make up when driving and regularly lets her dog sit on her lap when she is behind the wheel. Thirty-two year old Simon is a professional singer. In-car footage shows him using his car as a mobile office while driving and swerving to miss something while texting. Finally, Gabrielle, an 18 year old student, regularly eats behind the wheel. The camera catches her both eating an apple and texting, while driving.

Despite being confronted with their dangerous driving behaviour caught on camera, some of the drivers refuse to admit they were not in complete control of their vehicles. So they are taken to a track to assess their skills behind the wheel, in a specially designed hazards test at a driving centre.

Gethin is also curious to find out how his driving is affected when he is distracted. He takes part in a unique experiment for the programme to compare the impact of texting on his driving, against the effects of alcohol. He drives round a track twice, once fully in control and once while receiving and replying to a text message. On his second attempt, Gethin’s car swerves badly as he struggles to keep his eyes on the road. He also nearly hits a cyclist.

After watching back the footage of his two attempts he is shocked: “The difference between those two laps is quite incredible. In the second lap I was quite anxious if anything. I don’t remember looking out of my windscreen that much. I was looking down at my phone either texting or receiving a text. It’s just a bit of a disaster all the way through to be honest.”

Gethin then repeats the test under the influence of alcohol. Drink driving is the second biggest killer after speeding. After five glasses of wine, a breathalyser test reports that Gethin is over the legal limit..

Gethin feels very uncomfortable whilst driving and says: “This is really, really strange. I would never get in the car if I was feeling like this. I would never get in the car if I’d drunk as much wine as I have.”

Gethin asks Sergeant Chris Smith which performance was the worst. Sergeant Smith says: “When we look at the experiments you’ve done, it proves beyond all reasonable doubt that texting whilst you’re driving is as dangerous as drink driving. We all know how bad drink driving is. However, if you’re silly enough to text whilst you’re driving then I could be going to give a message to a family that one of their loved ones is dead.”

Gethin says: “I’ve been trying to compare which one is worse, texting whilst behind the wheel
or having a drink and driving. As I’m sobering up I’ve realised that they’re both awful. I never drink and drive. Never have and never will. But one thing’s for certain, I won’t be using my phone behind the wheel again.”

Gethin then spends the day with Devon and Cornwall Police who have launched a huge campaign against dangerous driving with Operation Vortex. Gethin learns that in the four weeks since the operation began, the police have pulled over nearly 1000 dangerous drivers and a quarter of these were distracted on the road.

PC Steve Morris tells Gethin about one shocking case: “One of my colleagues stopped a driver on the A30 in Cornwall and he was using dumbbells and working out whilst driving. He was training whilst driving and was reported straight to court.”

The programme also includes the heartbreaking story of Victoria McBryde who was killed in 2007 by Philippa Curtis. In a ground breaking case, Thames Valley Police claimed that receipt of a text was the distraction that caused Philippa Curtis to plough into Victoria’s stationary car which had broken down. After an extensive investigation, police discovered she had received twenty texts from five different friends as she drove.

Jennifer Ford, Victoria’s mother, speaks exclusively to the programme about the impact the accident has had on her family. “There was a policeman and a police woman standing at the door. They were holding Victoria’s bag. They said she’d been in a fatal accident and she’d been killed. I just stood here numb and then they repeated it and I just started screaming. The whole family was in total shock and I don’t think that we’ll ever, ever get over it. Since Victoria’s died our whole family has been blown apart.”

Finally, Gethin introduces Jamie, Jasmine, Simon and Gabrielle to Pauline Bradley who was walking across a pedestrian crossing when she was hit by a car four years ago. The driver admitted that because he was changing music on his CD player he didn’t see her. Pauline sustained huge injuries to her head and nearly died.

Pauline describes her injuries: “My face was smashed to pieces which meant that I had to have my head cut open. They had to pull all my face down to try and rebuild the bones that were broken. I’ve got three metal plates in my forehead. The head injury was so severe I now have problems with short term memory. I’ve lost my sense of smell, my sense of taste. It’s changed my life. My life will never be the same as it was before. I’ve suffered severe headaches. I’ve been told I can suffer severe epilepsy. I can’t work.”

Jasmine says: “I’ve never known someone to be in a serious accident so you never think it’s going to happen. And then when you meet someone it’s actually affected, you realise how stupid your actions are.”

Simon says: “To be honest, I’m angry with myself. I’m not just saying that because I’ve got a camera in my face. I am extremely angry with myself for even thinking that I could have got away with in the first place, to be honest. And it’s certainly going to change my driving habits.”

Thursday, 5 August 2010, 9:00PM – 10:00PM on ITV1

Episode Two: Fast & Furious

Speeding is the most common offence committed on British roads and leads to thousands of accidents a year, with one in four deaths on the road involving someone driving too fast. Yet many drivers continue to risk speeding at some point. In this episode, Gethin Jones investigates drivers who risk lives by recklessly going too fast and breaking the rules of the road.

The programme features shocking footage showing the risks people are prepared to take while speeding. This includes an American man reckless enough to climb into the cab of a speeding pick-up truck while being pursued by the police and a woman caught doing 118 miles an hour with a baby in the front seat next to her.

Gethin visits Oulton Park race track to experience the thrill of driving at 120 miles per hour. He discovers the rush driving at speed creates and what drives people to speed on the roads.

Gethin says: “That is just unreal. That feeling of pure speed is a massive adrenalin rush and you can probably tell I’ve got a big smile on my face.”

He then goes out on patrol with Central Motorways Police and Essex Police to search for speeding drivers on Britain’s roads. Among those stopped by the police is a man caught doing 104 mph with his wife and two children in the car.

Gethin also meets four drivers who are happy to admit they are serial speeders.

Mark, a manager in a packaging company, admits to speeding every day and has driven at a top speed of 150 miles per hour. Having been caught three times, he has received nine points. Property consultant Sunny, drives an Aston Martin and admits to a top speed of 170 miles per hour. He has been disqualified from driving three times and admits to having done 120 miles per hour in a 30 mile per hour zone. Michelle, a sales rep, is also addicted to the thrill of speeding and is quite happy to drive at 110 miles per hour in her car. Despite this Michelle says: “When I’m doing 100 miles an hour I feel completely safe. I don’t feel in any danger at all.”

Service engineer, Naz, drives over 60,000 miles a year for his job and has been banned in the past. Despite having 8 points on his license and admitting to a top speed of 155 miles per hour, he says: “I personally don’t think it’s speeding that kills. I think it’s incompetent drivers who kill. It’s people who don’t know how to handle their car and how to drive within their capabilities.”

Gethin says: “I’m amazed by these driver’s attitudes. They say they only speed on motorways and dual carriageways but they’ve all done racetrack speeds and believe they’re capable of handling it. If you travel at high speed you can quickly lose control.”

Gethin admits that he has also been caught for a speeding offence: “I must admit I’ve been done for speeding myself, I was doing 58 in a 50 zone. At the time I didn’t think I was going so fast that it could be called dangerous. How risky can an extra eight miles an hour be?”

To find out the potential consequences of his speeding, Gethin takes part in an exclusive test. PC Angus Nairn has marked out a course with a hazard and the safe stopping distance for a car doing 50 miles per hour. Gethin and PC Nairn both drive a car along the track, PC Nairn at 50 miles per hour and Gethin at 58 miles per hour. Gethin is shocked when both cars break and his car smashes straight through the hazard set up earlier.

He says: “Well I braked as hard as I possibly could, but I just could not stop in time. Angus stopped three metres before the barrier. But doing just eight miles an hour faster I could only stop 12 metres further on.”

PC Nairn has further news which frightens Gethin. He says: “As you are going through this tape you’d be doing almost 30 miles an hour. Deceleration only really occurs in the last few metres because you’ve got to consider your thinking time and then your reaction time to brake.”

Gethin is horrified by the results of the test. He says: “If that barrier had been a child I’d have hit them at 30 miles an hour and could have killed them. It’s a revelation to me that just a few extra miles an hour can make such a difference. From now on I’ll really watch my speed.”

The programme also features the tragic case of the Edwards family who were involved in a high speed road crash in 2006. Nineteen year old Antonio Boporan was driving his mother’s Range Rover at over 70 miles per hour in a 30 mile per hour zone, when he crashed into the Edwards family car.

Tracey Edwards talks to Gethin about the impact the accident has had on her daughter Cerys, who was just a year old at the time. Her mother says Cerys effectively died at the scene but was resuscitated. She cannot walk or talk and can survive only with a permanent ventilator. The round-the-clock care and medical equipment she requires means the Edwards family have to rent a house across the road from their home for Cerys to live in.

Tracey describes the accident to Gethin: “His lights were coming at us and he didn’t seem to slow down. I started screaming. It was like a tank and it was a huge bang. And then we were pushed 57 feet behind, into another vehicle.”

Gethin is horrified what the Edwards family have gone through. He says: “That family’s life has changed forever in a split second. They did absolutely nothing wrong. On the contrary they made sure Cerys was strapped in her baby seat in the back. They were keeping to the speed limit, they reacted quickly. But they just couldn’t do anything about the guy coming towards them because he was going so fast.”

Gethin then meets PC Andy Salt, a police forensic expert who collects and interprets evidence from road crashes.

Despite Antonio Boporan saying that he thought it was a 40 mile an hour limit and claiming he was doing just over that, PC Salt’s painstaking work allowed him to digitally recreate the accident and prove that Boporan was driving at a minimum of 71 miles per hour. He used a ‘black box’ from within the Range Rover to calculate the minimum speed the vehicle was travelling at, in a case which was the first of its kind in the UK.

Antonio Boporan was sentenced to 21 months in prison and served six. He also got a five year driving ban. He has never spoken publicly about the crash but speaks exclusively to the programme for the first time since the accident. Gethin visits his home to ask him about the crash and how he lives with the consequences.

Gethin then introduces Tracey and Cerys Edwards to Mark, Sunny, Michelle & Naz in an emotional confrontation at the end of the progamme. The details of their story have a profound effect on the drivers.

Speaking to the drivers about Cerys, Gethin says: “She needs a nurse and a carer at night. And she needs two people in the day. It doesn’t matter how good a driver you are. You could have had Michael Schumacher in there, he wouldn’t have stopped in time.”

The four speeding drivers are horrified. Mark says: “Words fail me. I just can’t explain how I’m feeling at the moment. Your beautiful daughter. Somebody did this and it was never your fault.”

Sobbing, Michelle says: “I just feel disgusted with myself I really do. I just feel really bad, I can only apologise for speeding.”

Thursday, 29 July 2010, 9:00PM – 10:00PM on ITV1

Brand new series presenter GETHIN JONES is at the helm of an action packed, fresh new format as the revamped Police Camera Action returns to ITV1 with four new programmes this summer.

Every show tackles head on a different issue currently affecting Britain’s road safety including speeding, distracted driving, young drivers and sleep deprived lorry drivers.

In each programme Gethin meets drivers who admit to taking risks behind the wheel. In-car camera footage shows how reckless their driving can be. The series challenges them to confront the reality of the dangers they pose to themselves and others in hard-hitting tests. Gethin also meets families forced to live with the devastating consequences of criminal driving and introduces them to the drivers who, hearing their tragic stories, are left to reflect on their own habits on the road.

Each episode also sees Gethin out on patrol with the police, as he immerses himself in the world of traffic crime, drawing attention to some of the most significant law enforcement issues on the road today.

And Gethin admits to his own past driving mistakes, speeding and using a mobile phone. He demonstrates the potential danger of one of them, speeding, along with other transgressions by getting behind the wheel in a series of experiments. He compares the effect of texting whilst driving to the consequences of being over the drink driving limit. He also drives an HGV after just four hours of sleep to examine how devastating the consequences of sleep deprivation can be. The shocking results of these challenges highlight just how easy it is to become a dangerous driver.

The series features insightful and emotional first-hand accounts from both victims and perpetrators of driving crimes. Some are telling their stories for the very first time to send out a strong road safety message in the hope of preventing tragedies similar to those they have experienced.

And Police Camera Action still contains heart stopping police footage showing the real life dangers of speeding and other reckless manoeuvres. The new series is must-see television and sees the return of one of ITV’s best loved brands.

Police Camera Action
Thursday 25 October 2007 10:00pm – 10:30pm on ITV1.

Police Camera Action is back with a new series featuring some of the most shocking driving and outrageous police chases captured on police cameras from Bedfordshire to Kentucky.

Programme Five focuses on customised cars with Alastair Stewart and Adrian Simpson investigating when radical design becomes radically dangerous.

Adrian attends the Ace Cafe London car meet with City of London Police Sergeant Andy Birks to demonstrate the five most dangerous and illegal car modifications. He explains that, while staff at the Ace Café are able to monitor and control the behaviour of those within the meet, the same does not apply to the road outside.

However, not all customised cars are hazards. Footage shows an already rare Lamborghini Gallardo, which the Italian State Police have modified to enable it to both record dangerous driving and keep organs destined for transplant recipients cool at 196 miles per hour.

Police in Befordshire are called in to break up an impromptu car cruise on a roundabout and Cambridgeshire Police Officers explain how over-tinted windows can be potentially deadly.

Police Camera Action is an Optomen Television Production for ITV1, produced and directed by Sarah Williams. The executive producer is Simon Walton.

Police Camera Action
Monday 15 October 2007 10:00pm – 10:30pm on ITV1.

Police Camera Action is back with a new series featuring some of the most shocking driving and outrageous police chases captured on police cameras from Bedfordshire to Kentucky.

In programme four, Alastair Stewart and Adrian Simpson address the issue of theft and learn that, as the crime diversifies, so must the measures taken to combat it.

Adrian meets Vehicle Inspector Martyn Weightman of Greater Manchester Police, who explains that not just high end performance cars are at risk from car thieves. As global demand for scrap metal grows, older cars without immobilisers are increasing being targeted for scrap.

Greater Manchester Police pursue a stolen Landrover which is breaking the speed limit heading the wrong way down a dual carriageway, while police in Peterborough enlist the help of Cambridgeshire’s Air Support Unit to track a youth on a stolen motorbike racing down pedestrian paths and across a football pitch in his attempts to evade capture.

And a new weapon in the battle against the criminals is revealed as footage shows car thieves in Canada caught on recently developed in-car cameras. But hi-tech tools need not be necessary, as Adrian discovers at the Motor Insurance Research Centre in Thatcham, where he learns how a wheel lock costing as little as £40 can stop even an extremely determined car thief.

With big trucks and vans involved in around 30 thousand accidents a year, in programme three presenters Alastair Stewart and Adrian Simpson focus on supersize vehicles causing supersize havoc.

Police Camera Action is back with a new series featuring some of the most shocking driving and outrageous police chases captured on police cameras from Bedfordshire to Kentucky.

In programme four, Alastair Stewart and Adrian Simpson address the issue of theft and learn that, as the crime diversifies, so must the measures taken to combat it.

Adrian meets Vehicle Inspector Martyn Weightman of Greater Manchester Police, who explains that not just high end performance cars are at risk from car thieves. As global demand for scrap metal grows, older cars without immobilisers are increasing being targeted for scrap.

Greater Manchester Police pursue a stolen Landrover which is breaking the speed limit heading the wrong way down a dual carriageway, while police in Peterborough enlist the help of Cambridgeshire’s Air Support Unit to track a youth on a stolen motorbike racing down pedestrian paths and across a football pitch in his attempts to evade capture.

And a new weapon in the battle against the criminals is revealed as footage shows car thieves in Canada caught on recently developed in-car cameras. But hi-tech tools need not be necessary, as Adrian discovers at the Motor Insurance Research Centre in Thatcham, where he learns how a wheel lock costing as little as £40 can stop even an extremely determined car thief.

With big trucks and vans involved in around 30 thousand accidents a year, in programme three presenters Alastair Stewart and Adrian Simpson focus on supersize vehicles causing supersize havoc.

Police Camera Action is back with a new series featuring some of the most shocking driving and outrageous police chases captured on police cameras from Bedfordshire to Kentucky.

With big trucks and vans involved in around 30 thousand accidents a year, in programme three presenters Alastair Stewart and Adrian Simpson focus on supersize vehicles causing supersize havoc.

Blind spots are already a serious problem for large vehicles however, as officers in Bedfordshire discover, this problem is vastly increased for foreign drivers whose seats are positioned in the left hand side of the cab. Traffic cops are called to the scene of an accident on the M1 involving a Lithuanian driver who was unable to see the small vehicle driving along side him and as a result ploughed into it at high speeds when moving to overtake.

Blinds spots aren’t the only issues faced by foreign drivers on British roads. UK weight restrictions differ to those of some European countries, meaning lorries which are legal on their own roads can be deemed illegal, and dangerous, here.

The programme meets the professionals tasked with enforcing these restrictions, while Adrian Simpson demonstrates the dangers posed to cyclists by lorry drivers, and how to avoid them.

Also caught on camera are an inebriated employee who has made off with his boss’s lorry, some ‘Laurel and Hardy’ style antics from the occupants of a white van which has lost its load and a thief who engages in a high speed chase in a stolen Landrover – with its caravan still attached!

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