The Tempest

Recently on ITV 4 I watched a version of William Shakespeare’s the Tempest, I decided read the script for the play and write an article for how I would portray this on stage.

Stage Directions for Miranda – The Tempest – Act 1, Scene 2

Miranda’s first few lines state that she is confused. Miranda says “What is it, a spirit? Lord how it looks about! Believe me, Sir, It carries a brave for. But it is a spirit.” During this fragment I would recommend the character portraying Miranda maybe fell to her knees with delight and wonder, spoken with a soft voice, an over whelmed facial expression, speaking in a confused and curious manner. I would use a violin playing quietly in the background to enhance the words spoken. To re-enforce the feeling Miranda has having never seen a man other than Caliban who isn’t really a brave noble husband she is looking for. The evidence in the text which would make me decide to portray it this way are Miranda’s confused words, for example the frequent usage of question marks in the punctual side of the text make me think she is inquisitive and confused about the present event.

The “I might call him a thing divine, for nothing natural I ever saw so noble.” segment of the text should be portrayed with a hand on the heart after a few seconds and a forwards strafe and with a loving gaze slowly look up to the sky after the last word (Noble.) Pronounce the adjectives very over the top and slow as if the character is in love and is flabbergasted by the sights she is seeing. The text makes me in my head portray this part like this because of all the compliments Miranda is giving and comparing him to a divine and calling him noble.

“No Wonder, Sir, but certainly a maid.” This could be spoken with a pause after the “sir” and spoken in a slightly slow and a love stricken tone. After that part then “But certainly a maid” Should be spoken quickly as if the words before this disadvantaged her in some way, to make sure she advertised her self slightly.

“Why speaks my father so urgently? This is the third man that I ever saw, the first that I ever sighed for. Pity moves my father to be inclined my way!” This is the next piece that Miranda will be required to say. In my view the portrayal of this segmentation would be an exasperating tone. Miranda should burst out and almost verbally attack her father’s words with a slightly angry and annoyed expression on her face.

In the section where Miranda speaks again and says “there is nothing so ill can dwell in such a temple. If the ill spirit have so fair a house, Good things will strive to dwell with it.” Miranda says this in a soft tone with love in her heart, we should be able to feel the love in her heart though the tone of her voice. Miranda should look deeply into Ferdinand’s eyes and smile softly. Maybe you could hear some bears singing softly in the background and see Miranda gently touch Ferdinand’s cheek and slowly stroke his face and moving her hand down his face, ONLY ONCE, not as if Miranda is stroking a cat but just romantically feeling his soft cheeks.

After Ferdinand draws his sword and is charmed from moving Miranda’s character says “O dear father, make not too rash a trial of him, for He’s gentle and not fearful” Miranda should express this in a soft and gentle manner, but still enough to make a convincing plea to her father. This should be spoken with a prominent pitch.

The short three word line of Miranda which follows Prospero’s counter threats mean Miranda’s portrayal of this part “Beseech you Father” should be in an angry manner meanwhile grabbing Prospero’s robes and attempting with all her might to stop him.

The part where Miranda speaks to Prospero “My affections are most humble. I have no ambition to see a goodlier man.” should be spoken in a convincing tone which explains to Prospero that Miranda is perfectly satisfied with Ferdinand even after Prospero’s words to convince her to abandon him.

The final segment of this scene spoken by Miranda is “My Father’s of a better nature, sir, than he appears by speech, this is unwanted which now came from him”. This should be spoken in a convincing and reassuring tone.

Recently on ITV 4 I watched a version of William Shakespeare’s the Tempest, I decided read the script for the play and write an article for how I would portray this on stage.

Stage Directions for Miranda – The Tempest – Act 1, Scene 2

Miranda’s first few lines state that she is confused. Miranda says “What is it, a spirit? Lord how it looks about! Believe me, Sir, It carries a brave for. But it is a spirit.” During this fragment I would recommend the character portraying Miranda maybe fell to her knees with delight and wonder, spoken with a soft voice, an over whelmed facial expression, speaking in a confused and curious manner. I would use a violin playing quietly in the background to enhance the words spoken. To re-enforce the feeling Miranda has having never seen a man other than Caliban who isn’t really a brave noble husband she is looking for. The evidence in the text which would make me decide to portray it this way are Miranda’s confused words, for example the frequent usage of question marks in the punctual side of the text make me think she is inquisitive and confused about the present event.

The “I might call him a thing divine, for nothing natural I ever saw so noble.” segment of the text should be portrayed with a hand on the heart after a few seconds and a forwards strafe and with a loving gaze slowly look up to the sky after the last word (Noble.) Pronounce the adjectives very over the top and slow as if the character is in love and is flabbergasted by the sights she is seeing. The text makes me in my head portray this part like this because of all the compliments Miranda is giving and comparing him to a divine and calling him noble.

“No Wonder, Sir, but certainly a maid.” This could be spoken with a pause after the “sir” and spoken in a slightly slow and a love stricken tone. After that part then “But certainly a maid” Should be spoken quickly as if the words before this disadvantaged her in some way, to make sure she advertised her self slightly.

“Why speaks my father so urgently? This is the third man that I ever saw, the first that I ever sighed for. Pity moves my father to be inclined my way!” This is the next piece that Miranda will be required to say. In my view the portrayal of this segmentation would be an exasperating tone. Miranda should burst out and almost verbally attack her father’s words with a slightly angry and annoyed expression on her face.

In the section where Miranda speaks again and says “there is nothing so ill can dwell in such a temple. If the ill spirit have so fair a house, Good things will strive to dwell with it.” Miranda says this in a soft tone with love in her heart, we should be able to feel the love in her heart though the tone of her voice. Miranda should look deeply into Ferdinand’s eyes and smile softly. Maybe you could hear some bears singing softly in the background and see Miranda gently touch Ferdinand’s cheek and slowly stroke his face and moving her hand down his face, ONLY ONCE, not as if Miranda is stroking a cat but just romantically feeling his soft cheeks.

After Ferdinand draws his sword and is charmed from moving Miranda’s character says “O dear father, make not too rash a trial of him, for He’s gentle and not fearful” Miranda should express this in a soft and gentle manner, but still enough to make a convincing plea to her father. This should be spoken with a prominent pitch.

The short three word line of Miranda which follows Prospero’s counter threats mean Miranda’s portrayal of this part “Beseech you Father” should be in an angry manner meanwhile grabbing Prospero’s robes and attempting with all her might to stop him.

The part where Miranda speaks to Prospero “My affections are most humble. I have no ambition to see a goodlier man.” should be spoken in a convincing tone which explains to Prospero that Miranda is perfectly satisfied with Ferdinand even after Prospero’s words to convince her to abandon him.

The final segment of this scene spoken by Miranda is “My Father’s of a better nature, sir, than he appears by speech, this is unwanted which now came from him”. This should be spoken in a convincing and reassuring tone.

 

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