Trial and Retribution

Friday, 13 February 2009, 9:00PM on ITV1

Satchell wants to go and confront the Bilkins. He wants to have it out with them. If necessary he’ll beat it out of them. Connor has to calm him, they’re just trying to scare him. Going off and attacking the Bilkins won’t serve any purpose, it’ll just play right into their hands. Anyway, they have their alibis ready. The kidnap unit are being briefed and readied, and Satchell is getting to breaking point, when there’s a breakthrough. Kay calls Satch, tells him that her and Abi have been released by their kidnappers, who posed as police officers. Satchell and several patrol cars rush to pick them up from the street corner they’ve been left on. They’re shocked, but back in one piece with their unborn baby unharmed.

What’s concerning Walker is how it was discovered that Satch was the eyewitness at Miller’s murder? Do they have a mole in their team. DC Short meets with Donna and Zoe Bilkin. She says they never mentioned anything about kidnapping Satchell’s wife and kid. If he had have done he’d have not gone anywhere near it. Short is about to get out of the car, when Zoe grabs her by his hair. She jerks her head back and tells her she’d better listen. They make it clear that they need to know how the Miller investigation is going. Short is their inside man and she better not forget that.

A burnt-out white van has been discovered on a piece of wasteland, the same one that was used in Miller’s killing. Prints are lifted of the petrol can found nearby, belonging to Johnny Howells. When questioned, he claims he just walked past and picked it up, that’s all. He denies all knowledge of the Bilkins. Connor is convinced that Howells was part of the abduction.

Joe Miller’s murder is brought back into focus with a breakthrough. CCTV footage of a white van pulling in at a petrol station near the health club, just after the shooting. A man gets out, but he wears a baseball cap and his collar turned up, so it’s impossible to get a good look at him. But they do at least now have the vehicle registration. Ballistics are back on Miller. The killers were taking no chances – eleven bullets in total, four in the chest, three in the head. What’s interesting is the fact that bullets extracted from the body are also like the ones that killed Wilson. Walker is thinking this has to be the same gun which Bilkin passed to his sons.

On Wimbledon common, a dog walker finds a gun dumped in a bin-bag. Just like the one used in both killings, so now they have another go at Bilkin. Lenny Bilkin isn’t letting his stay in prison alter his belief that he is some sort of untouchable human being. He stares Walker straight in the eye. He denies ever owning a Beretta pistol. Now Miller’s dead the police have nothing. He couldn’t have killed Miller, he was in the nick.

Connor requestions Jamie Johnson. He discloses that Joe was having a relationship with Barry Bilkin. Was Joe shot because of business, or by a jilted lover? Connor goes to Wendy. Did she know her husband was gay? When Joe turned up as a prosecution witness, Barry wanted him dead for two reasons – he’d betrayed him and he didn’t want Lenny discovering his son’s sexual preferences. Walker is convinced Terry is the shooter, but Connor asserts that Barry is the one with motive. Walker confronts Satch – someone, somewhere let the Bilkins know that Satch was there.

Satch knows what Walker is implying and blows up, threatening to quit the force. Palmer interrupts with an update – they’ve found the Toyota that was used to abduct Kay and Abi. Prints found on the car identify Johnny Howells and small time criminal Fabio Conte. Under questioning Howells refuses to finger the Bilkins, claiming the kidnapping was his idea. The Bilkins’s reputation still instils fear it seems.

Satch tells Short he knows who the shooter is and is ready to positively identify Miller’s assassin. Later at home, his mobile goes, it’s Donna Bilkin. She tells him he has a choice – she can pay him to lose his memory. Satch tells her he’s ready to deal. But now Satch confronts Short – he now knows that she must be the mole. He grabs her, nearly strangling her. Short breaks down and confesses. She tells them that the Bilkins have a safe house in Hertfordshire – that’s where Satch is to meet Donna.

In a woodland clearing near the safe house, Satch faces Donna and Terry. Terry raises his gun, but a shot rings out from the covert police marksman, and Terry falls to the ground, and Donna runs to his side. Connor visits Lenny in prison, telling him about Terry death and that Barry has given a statement admitting to the two killings. Lenny is distraught – he’s now lost both his children.

Friday, 13 February 2009, 9:00PM on ITV1

Satchell wants to go and confront the Bilkins. He wants to have it out with them. If necessary he’ll beat it out of them. Connor has to calm him, they’re just trying to scare him. Going off and attacking the Bilkins won’t serve any purpose, it’ll just play right into their hands. Anyway, they have their alibis ready. The kidnap unit are being briefed and readied, and Satchell is getting to breaking point, when there’s a breakthrough. Kay calls Satch, tells him that her and Abi have been released by their kidnappers, who posed as police officers. Satchell and several patrol cars rush to pick them up from the street corner they’ve been left on. They’re shocked, but back in one piece with their unborn baby unharmed.

What’s concerning Walker is how it was discovered that Satch was the eyewitness at Miller’s murder? Do they have a mole in their team. DC Short meets with Donna and Zoe Bilkin. She says they never mentioned anything about kidnapping Satchell’s wife and kid. If he had have done he’d have not gone anywhere near it. Short is about to get out of the car, when Zoe grabs her by his hair. She jerks her head back and tells her she’d better listen. They make it clear that they need to know how the Miller investigation is going. Short is their inside man and she better not forget that.

A burnt-out white van has been discovered on a piece of wasteland, the same one that was used in Miller’s killing. Prints are lifted of the petrol can found nearby, belonging to Johnny Howells. When questioned, he claims he just walked past and picked it up, that’s all. He denies all knowledge of the Bilkins. Connor is convinced that Howells was part of the abduction.

Joe Miller’s murder is brought back into focus with a breakthrough. CCTV footage of a white van pulling in at a petrol station near the health club, just after the shooting. A man gets out, but he wears a baseball cap and his collar turned up, so it’s impossible to get a good look at him. But they do at least now have the vehicle registration. Ballistics are back on Miller. The killers were taking no chances – eleven bullets in total, four in the chest, three in the head. What’s interesting is the fact that bullets extracted from the body are also like the ones that killed Wilson. Walker is thinking this has to be the same gun which Bilkin passed to his sons.

On Wimbledon common, a dog walker finds a gun dumped in a bin-bag. Just like the one used in both killings, so now they have another go at Bilkin. Lenny Bilkin isn’t letting his stay in prison alter his belief that he is some sort of untouchable human being. He stares Walker straight in the eye. He denies ever owning a Beretta pistol. Now Miller’s dead the police have nothing. He couldn’t have killed Miller, he was in the nick.

Connor requestions Jamie Johnson. He discloses that Joe was having a relationship with Barry Bilkin. Was Joe shot because of business, or by a jilted lover? Connor goes to Wendy. Did she know her husband was gay? When Joe turned up as a prosecution witness, Barry wanted him dead for two reasons – he’d betrayed him and he didn’t want Lenny discovering his son’s sexual preferences. Walker is convinced Terry is the shooter, but Connor asserts that Barry is the one with motive. Walker confronts Satch – someone, somewhere let the Bilkins know that Satch was there.

Satch knows what Walker is implying and blows up, threatening to quit the force. Palmer interrupts with an update – they’ve found the Toyota that was used to abduct Kay and Abi. Prints found on the car identify Johnny Howells and small time criminal Fabio Conte. Under questioning Howells refuses to finger the Bilkins, claiming the kidnapping was his idea. The Bilkins’s reputation still instils fear it seems.

Satch tells Short he knows who the shooter is and is ready to positively identify Miller’s assassin. Later at home, his mobile goes, it’s Donna Bilkin. She tells him he has a choice – she can pay him to lose his memory. Satch tells her he’s ready to deal. But now Satch confronts Short – he now knows that she must be the mole. He grabs her, nearly strangling her. Short breaks down and confesses. She tells them that the Bilkins have a safe house in Hertfordshire – that’s where Satch is to meet Donna.

In a woodland clearing near the safe house, Satch faces Donna and Terry. Terry raises his gun, but a shot rings out from the covert police marksman, and Terry falls to the ground, and Donna runs to his side. Connor visits Lenny in prison, telling him about Terry death and that Barry has given a statement admitting to the two killings. Lenny is distraught – he’s now lost both his children.

Friday, 6 February 2009, 9:00PM on ITV1

Belsize Park. Night. A BMW, and a white van, pull up outside the home of Colin Wilson, jewellery shop manager. Three men get out, balaclavas over their faces. Two carry guns, one carries a sledge hammer. The moment Wilson opens the door, The Sledgehammer Man is straight in, smashing everything in sight. The other two men are hard on his heels waving guns and screaming. In the struggle, one attacker’s balaclava is ripped off – Lenny Bilkin, mid-50s with a complexion like it’s been cultivated by plenty of afternoons on the golf course. He puts his balaclava back on before dragging Wilson outside, bundling him into the BMW’s boot, with his wife and child in the van. They arrive at the jewellery shop, where the alarm goes off as Wilson is frogmarched through the door, a Beretta pushed against the back of his head. In his panic to turn off the alarm, he hits the wrong button. Now there’s no turning it off. The man in the balaclava doesn’t hesitate. The game’s over. He pulls the trigger, blowing Wilson’s brains out.

The Old Bailey, several months later. Lenny Bilkin, and his two sons Barry and Terry, are in the dock. Terry’s early thirties, a chip of the old block – his younger brother doesn’t seem to have the Bilkin confident swagger. In the gallery are their wives, Zoe and Wendy. Beside them sits Donna Bilkin, Lenny’s wife. The defence barrister, Felix Levington, is doing a fine job of discrediting the prosecution’s case. From the wife’s identification to the forensic evidence, all are undermined enough to plant reasonable doubt. Even what should be the damning testimony from Joe Miller, a known associate of the Bilkins who says he was approached before the jewellery job, is taken apart by Levington.

Both Terry and Barry Bilkin are found not guilty. However they were unable to reach a verdict on Lenny Bilkin, meaning he will have to be retried. The Bilkin Family celebrate. Joe Miller refuses the offer of police protection, claiming he’s not scared of the Bilkins. Walker and Connor know Lenny Bilkin’s first order from inside will be a revenge job on Miller. With ownership of the Trojan Health Club as his legitimate front, Miller is looking to move into the Bilkins’ territory. If the Bilkins were out of the way, Miller could expand his business overnight. There would be no one to stop him.

Connor and Satchell pay a visit to the Trojan. Miller works out while answering their questions. His boyfriend, Jamie, looks on. Jamie confirms Miller’s story – that Lenny Bilkin came to the club, that he and Miller had several meetings shortly before the jewellery job was pulled. Miller remains the key witness, but encouraged by Jamie, he is having second thoughts about testifying against Bilkin again. Miller tells Satch he won’t be appearing at the retrial.

As Satchell makes his way from the club, the screech of a van pulling up outside makes him turn. Miller is now walking to his car. The van door bangs opens, a man wearing a balaclava emerges, carrying a gun. A Beretta. He pumps four bullets into Miller’s chest. Satchell hits the deck. Crawling on his hands and knees he tries to stay safe. The shooter moves over to where Miller is lying, bleeding on the tarmac. Three more rounds into Miller’s head. Satchell, still hidden behind his car, gets a glimpse of the shooter as the van pulls away. Walker and Connor are quickly on the case. Satch is actually in a state of shock. Watching someone coolly executed is a new experience for him. Walker wants to talk to him before anybody else does. Satch tells Walker he’s positive the shooter was one of the Bilkin boys, he recognised his eyes. What about the van? White … transit van … at a guess a 2.0 TD. Partial ID on the reg – 04 – that’s all. Barry and Terry are taken in for questioning. Connor tells them they have an eye witness that saw them at the scene of a shooting. Terry just starts to smile. He has an alibi for the time – both he and Barry were with their wives and their mother, plus a dozen or so others. They were celebrating a friend’s birthday. Walker and Connor set about checking it out. DC Carol Short has been assigned to Connor’s team, following her past experience with the Bilkins. Climbing into her car after a long day’s work, Johnny Howells, career small-time villain, jumps into the passenger seat. From his coat pocket he takes a wad of cash – £10,000 – it’s hers if he tells them who the copper is that ID’d them at the shooting. Short looks at the money.

Kay Satchell is walking home from school with their daughter, Abigail. A Toyota car pulls up alongside. Kay speaks to the driver briefly, before she and Abi climb into the back of the car. Satchell has had a hell of a day. He calls home. No reply. She’s probably putting Abi to bed. He tries again. This time there is an answer – a man’s voice, telling him that they are ‘looking after’ his wife and child, then hangs up. Satchell stands there, before screaming he’ll kill them … he’ll kill them.

 

Friday, 30 January 2009, 9:00PM on ITV1

Walker pays a solo visit to the fair. Like Connor before him he gets a tarot session with Mrs Southwood. She blows him away bringing up his family situation, his lack of parenting, and he is warned that he must make decisions or there will be a tragedy.

Walker looks over the big wheel, which is still not allowed to work. He asks to check over the actual seat that broke causing the girl to fall to her death. He can see the loose bolts, and when he examines the other swing seats he’s not that sure if the big Wheel was ever safe.

Walker is walked through the ghost train and sees how the dead man had to have been propped up next to the giant spider. It is obvious to him that whoever used Pops body to create the scandal had to have known the layout and, as Pops was not a small man but over six feet, his body would possibly have been carried by two or more men into the ghost train.

Walker’s meets with Connor and her team. He is adamant that they are and should be looking at suspects working the Funfair. Anyone connected to the fair and gaining from its closure is hard to pin point, all the employees would lose out if it was closed. The property development company is legitimate and with a large project to be built on the waste ground and with building permits in place, just so long as the situation with Pops’ lease is cleared up.

Again, the obvious motive is that someone eager to sell to the property developers instigated the damage to the Big Wheel. This does not link to the Pops situation, why place his body in the Ghost train tunnel? To create more adverse publicity? Their suspicions focus on the new owners of the land because it now looks as if they have achieved what they wanted. The closure of the funfair is on the cards.

Walker suggests they investigate from a different angle. To date no one has talked to the young victim’s family, perhaps the motive they have all focused on is incorrect. They have not found anything incriminating from their interview with the developers – to the contrary they have been or appeared to be honest. They have also not met with any suspicious motives from the heir of the land, apart from losing out on a fortune if they can’t sell.

The victim is Vicky Ellis aged sixteen, a young local girl who, with her friends, frequented the fair almost nightly. The girls have not been questioned, previously as none were on the Big Wheel when the safety bar came loose. Only the young girl that survived the accident has been questioned. At the time she was still in a state of shock as she was almost killed herself.

Connor gets sketchy details that Vicky was quite sexually permissive and did hang out with the lads running the fun fair. She had been dating one guy Pavel, a Romanian immigrant who works at the fair. Pavel gives little away, just that he had dated the victim a couple of times but got sick of her hanging around every night. Asked if there was anyone else the girl might have been seeing he shrugs, and then infers that maybe they should talk to Tommy – old man Pops’ grandson – as he had a big thing for the girl.

The sad outcome is that Tommy under pressure admits that he did loosen the safety bar. Vicky had been playing him along and then laughed at him, he did not mean it ever to have such terrible consequences, he just wanted to frighten her.

Tommy had been in Pops’ trailer when the old man confronted him and accused him of messing with the big wheel. In a fit of fury when he discovered Tommy’s part in the ‘accident; he had collapsed with a heart attack.

Theresa, scared that it would all come out, and wanting to make it look as if there were other motives convinced Tommy to carry the old man to the ghost train, smash his head in and then prop him up behind the big spider, in an attempt to implicate Pavel.
Tommy is charged with the manslaughter of Vicky, Theresa with perverting the course of justice. The fun fair closes.

Satchell gets a visit from his Auntie and it isn’t not a pleasant one. She always suspected Tommy, but could never admit it to anyone, least of all Pops, who she has been in a sort of on-off relationship with for years. She wants the best barristers money can buy for Tommy and she has the cash to pay for it. Pops wasn’t the great man everyone thought he was, he’d taken fifty thousand pounds in cash to quit the lease for the fairground. It was always going to close… he just didn’t know how to tell everyone that he was pulling out.

The Trial of Tommy Henshall and the defence go for manslaughter. Prosecution try for murder – as a fifteen-year-old he will get time in a young offender’s prison.

Friday, 23 January 2009, 9:00PM on ITV1

The ‘accident’ occurs early evening at Gilberts Funfair. As the wheel turns with most seats taken, the last few customers get aboard and we pick out a very pretty teenager, Vicky. She is laughing and joking with her friend sitting beside her. The wheel begins its slow turn as the two girls get to the very top and now all seats are occupied. The wheel picks up momentum, and to screams of horror and terror the young girls safety bar comes loose. Both young teenage girls cling on as the team working the wheel shout for them to stay still. We see one of the fairground workers climbing up the wheel when Vicky topples from her seat and crashes to the ground below.

Connor and Satchell are winding down a case when Satchell gets a visit from a distant relative. He has never mentioned to anyone that part of his family on his mother’s side were not exactly travellers but had Gypsy connections. Teresa Southwood (Madame Zorna, fortune teller) turns up at the station. He has never met her, and knows little of this side of his family, and is very embarrassed.

Teresa asks Satchell to help her because due to the accident the funfair is in dire financial straights. She swears that the big wheel had been checked and double checked, and that it was not an accident but someone had tampered with the swing seat and loosened the screws on the safety bar.

Why would anyone want to do that?

Pops’ youngest grandchild, also called Tommy, although only a teenager, is a seasoned fairground kid. Tommy was part of the team over-seeing the Big Wheel when Vicky died.

The lease on the land, the owner and his son want to develop the land, but with a further ten years on the lease, and in a legal contract to Pops, they can’t sell.

Pops has had visitors making threats and told them to get stuffed. Teresa wants the police to investigate, and she implies that it was not an accident but murder.

Satchell has a word with Connor. She dismisses anyone from her team being able look into the situation. Satchell believes they should at least show some kind of ‘interest’ but again Connor refuses. No murder has occurred, but a tragic accident they cannot simply step in as a murder squad.

Satchell, in his free time, visits the Funfair. He talks to the group of men who run the Big Wheel, and they are adamant that all safety checks had been done. Even the young fifteen-year-old grandson Tommy says that he was there for all the checks which they do every day the fair is open for business. The Big Wheel is still not allowed to run until health and safety have finished their enquiry. The wheel is a big money spinner and out of action and the bad publicity the fair is not doing any business.

Satchell has a lengthy talk to Pops who, like his men, swear they were over-cautious regarding the wheel. Pops is sure somebody had tampered with it as he had refused to negotiate and sell the lease.

Satchell reports back to Connor, and again she is adamant that they can have nothing to do with the situation. She warns Satchell not to get too involved, if he wants to make enquiries on his own time that’s his prerogative but not as a Met officer. He should talk to the health and safety department and get their results.

Connor and Palmer discuss Satchell’s connections to the fairground and especially to Madame Zorna. Without mentioning it to Satchell they arrange an evening out at the funfair.

They walk around the funfair, buying candy floss and Palmer hits with a sledge hammer the weight target to ring a bell and gets a huge teddy bear. Although just having a ‘nose around’ they are never the less not exactly sight-seeing, but they are very interested by Madame Zorna’s booth and that she is the connection to Dave Satchell, something he has kept very quiet.

Connor has her fortune read, and is taken aback by the quiet rather frightening woman. Mrs Southwood is very good, and reading the tarot cards gives Connor a shiver.

Connor and Palmer board the Ghost Train. As it does its rather tacky journey there are some trailing cobwebs and skeletons, but the screams get to fever pitch when a massive spider swings across the train and right behind the spider and falling across the empty seat in front of them is the body of Pops. His head has been smashed with a sledge hammer.

Connor now has the murder enquiry. This new development closes down the funfair. It is also a nightmare of an enquiry as there were so many punters around, and trying to ascertain who saw what is problematic.

Walker can’t believe it – Connor and Palmer on a ghost train. Never mind the implications of their connection via Satchell.

Satchell is questioned by Connor again, and he is angry saying he had even warned them that the ‘accident’ was a murder. Connor now has no alternative but to link the accident and subsequent murder of Pops as one case. This is due to the fact that swing that broke causing the accident had loose screws, yet the mechanic swears he checked it before the evening. Tommy is also questioned and he says he even sat in the chairs to make sure the bars were safe.

Connor begins the mass of interviews and also meets with the health and safety team for more details on their report. The motive she believes has to be the lease situation, so the owners of the land become the prime suspects. The more she delves into the ‘accident’ the more she begins to suspect the Big Wheel was tampered with and the tragic result was the death of the young teenage girl.

The post mortem report on Pops – the blow to his head had not killed him, he actually died of a massive heart attack. Somebody therefore moved his body to the ghost train ride.

Walker and Connor thrash out the case to date – it’s very complicated, They can charge someone for moving Pops’ corpse to the Ghost train, for wasting police time etc but if they can prove without doubt the big wheel was ‘tampered with’ and resulted in the death of a teenager then that will become the main focus of a murder investigation. Has Pops’ murder merely been an illusion?

Friday, 16 January 2009, 9:00PM on ITV1

In the lockup, as bodies are taken away, McGill and Connor recap to Walker the whole business of inducing liquid cocaine into plywood screens and delivering them to the UK. Back at base Walker confronts the team with the fact that they have to find Imogen before Hikmet does. They need to know where and who she might run to. Imogen is arriving in a cab at the lockup, seeing the gawkers, cops and morgue vans. She tries to stay calm as she gets the cab to turn around.

Connor needs to find and bring in Hikmet. McGill is playing the long game. That means finding Hikmet and tracking him to get to his distribution network. To find Hikmet, they have to find Imogen. Walker splits the investigation in two – and sends Connor to work with McGill. Something that may only fuel the sexual tension between them.

Walker puts a call into Imogen, leaving messages asking her to call. He knows he’s been taken in by her. A press conference appeal is broadcast by Tanya, asking her to come in. She has holed herself in a hotel, lying low. Imogen calls Hikmet, requesting a meeting, before attempting to board a plane. However, she’s made at the counter, and flees.

At the drug squad HQ, Connor is given the cold treatment by the team. So far as to hide details of their ongoing investigation from her, a wall of silence. In her frustration, Connor intercepts a call from McGill’s informant, about the whereabouts of Hikmet. Connor takes the message herself, and meets Christine, convincing her that McGill says it’s ok
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Christine tells her that Hikmet has threatened her that morning, asking where Clem is. She overhears the call from Imogen, and about their arrangement to meet.

Connor tells Walker and they arrange to be at the meet, without involving McGill. The stakeout is arranged. Hikmet is watched as he approaches. All the police in position. However, before anyone can move, Imogen, at the wheel her car. Her foot’s hard on the gas and she’s not going to stop until she’s mown down the man who killed Sebastian, the man who would kill her if she gave him chance. A sick thud of metal and bone and Hikmet is thrown over the windscreen. Hikmet survives, just, and is charged with murder in his hospital bed.

Despite her denials about the drug deal, the circumstantial evidence surrounding is mounting up. Under intense questioning from Walker and Satch, she is close to breakdown. Finally, she signs a witness statement, acknowledging her part in the drug import deal, and will testify against Hikmet which in turn is bad news for the drug squad. All their informants have gone silent, something has got them spooked. Christine has gone missing. McGill fears the worst. So does Connor. The worst appears to be true, Christine has been beaten within an inch of her life.

McGill knows what Connor has done, what line she has crossed. Connor left her exposed and vulnerable, with no protection. Imogen withdraws her agreement to testify.

At Sebastian’s funeral, Walker talks with Imogen. He’s worked out that she is worried she could be charged with causing Sebastian’s death by withholding his medication, causing his seizure. And it was that which killed him, not the gunshot from Hikmet. That’s what haunts and frightens her.

McGill is threatening to make a formal complaint against Connor, something in her heart she knows he has every right to do. Full of remorse, she talks to McGill. She even volunteers to surrender her badge.

He reminds her that it’s not the badge that matters, but the heart behind it.

Friday, 9 January 2009, 9:00PM on ITV1

The vastness of the equatorial rain forests – seen from the air. A mighty river curves through it. Paper masks half hide South American faces – brown eyes below thick black hair. Decorated screens are sprayed with layers of lacquer. Cut to: An ambulance pulls up outside a London flat.

Paramedics race inside. A man writhing in pain on the hallway floor. A young woman yelling about getting him to hospital. Ambulance doors slam shut and it races away. The driver’s doing seventy-five, but in the wing-mirror he sees a BMW is gaining, and pulls level. Tinted windows roll down, a gun is aimed at the ambulance driver. The BMW accelerates, swings across. A crunch of metal. The ambulance forced off the road, a 360-degree roll as it tumbles into a ditch. Siren screaming.

Connor and Walker at the scene. The ambulance was heading back to A&E with a mid 20s male. First name Sebastian. An unknown woman was with him. Connor and Walker circle the ambulance. The rear doors are open wide, there lies Sebastian, very dead. There’s no ID on him. But where’s the woman?

At the flat, the front door’s open wide. Satch enters warily. The place is empty. No furniture, no carpets, curtains – nothing. Either someone’s just moving in or just moved out. Satch turning into the gravel drive of a large house. A delivery of furniture — bubble-wrapped chairs, a table, a wooden screen — in the drive. Tanya Buller – mid 50s, very verbal, very loud – signs for the delivery. Satch asks her to confirm she’s the owner of an empty flat and does she know a man named Sebastian? Yes he’s her daughter Imogen’s fiancé.

Connor joins Walker on the edge of the service station area. A shout goes up. They head towards a commotion fifty yards away. A figure (Imogen) – bruised, bloody, unsteady and barefoot – steps out of the darkness. She’s shaking and sobbing, pleading for help. Connor briefs Walker on Imogen Buller-Turi – ‘it girl’ and favourite of the redtops, full-time socialite, hooked up with Sebastian a year ago.

Imogen’s in a private bed. She’s been cleaned up and sedated. She’s badly bruised from the crash, no fractures. Walker can see Connor doesn’t get what they’re dealing with here. Celebrity mother. Tabloid couple – it’s tabloid heaven.

In a North London Turkish café Hikmet catches sight of the TV news in the corner. He yells in Turkish for quiet. The report shows the crime scene. Then it identifies Imogen as the daughter of rich and famous parents. This is obviously news to Hikmet.

Connor and Satch check take a closer look around Seb’s car and flat. An empty blister pack of pills beside its box on the floor in the kitchen.

Meanwhile, Hikmet arrives at the hospital. However, once he sees the two armed officers outside the private room he heads away.

Palmer fills in Connor on Imogen and Sebastian’s recent movements. They made arrangements for their wedding in a few weeks time, then took a holiday together. First a few days in North Cyprus then trekking through Ecuador. Satch discovers a substantial sum of money was transferred from Imogen’s trust fund to a Cyprus bank – £150k. Was the boyfriend financing a drug deal? A drug deal that went wrong and lead to him getting a bullet in his skull. Walker wants to know about the trip to Ecuador. He hears they stayed in a small town just 30 km from the Columbian border. Did Sebastian make any trips on his own or arrange to meet anyone when she wasn’t around? Imogen tries to cover up the truth, but under pressure admits Sebastian did make a trip alone. He said he wanted to camp overnight in jungle he thought was too dangerous for her.

Connor assesses. As an ‘amateur’ he’d need bone fide introductions to an importer before they’d even take his call. Find out the go-between and they’ll get closer to Sebastian’s killer. Then a clip turns up on YouTube: A man (Hikmet) in a baseball cap crosses to the open doors of the ambulance and fires a shot.

Satch has something; Sebastian Cole used to share a flat with a man named Clem Ross – a known middle market cocaine supplier. Connor and Satch arrive at Clem’s address in vain. Staking out the place are drug squad, senior officer is DI McGill.The two teams shift into mutual suspicion mode – neither wants to give away information about their investigation until they have to. Finally, reluctantly, McGill tells they were trying to connect Clem to a middle market dealer with plans to move up the chain and import cocaine. A Turk by the name of Orhan Hikmet who was in Columbia at the time Sebastian Cole was in Ecuador.

Walker and Satch question Imogen about Clem. She tells them yes he was a good friend of Seb’s, this is absurd. He must have the wrong Clem.

Walker sees six items on the delivery note and five in the hall. Walker races up the stairs, bursts into Imogen’s room – she’s gone.

Connor and McGill are visiting a lock-up an informant told them Clem was using. We see sheets of plywood have been removed from inside the decorative screen. Shavings from them are in the process of being boiled down in a large vat. We pull back and see four bodies on the floor. Three are young men. The last one we see is Clem Ross.

Thursday 27 March 2008 9:00pm – 10:00pm on ITV1.

The trial begins. The prosecuting QC presents her evidence: the incredible, coincidences, the tracks crossing again and again. The boys’ lies and subsequent admission about being at the pit. Andy meeting Maria at the club. The boys on CCTV with Maria at the petrol station. The prints on the bottle. Darren is looking increasingly agitated. Andy trying to reassure him. The defence begins. Darren looks nervous and white-faced as he stands up in the dock. He tells the judge he’s changed his mind, he wants to give evidence. Andy shouts across the court, what he’s doing, telling him to sit down. His barrister looks worried. The judge adjourns until the following morning.

As they get back home, Ray takes Andy to one side, gives his son a pep talk. He understands Andy fancied the girl, he wanted to have a bit of fun with her at the chalk pit but it’s obvious it was Darren who flipped out and killed Maria. We get the feeling that this is what Ray has always done, stamped his authority and attitudes onto his son. He tells Andy he’ll get him out of this mess, even if it means being at Darren’s expense. Later that night at the Harper home, the phone rings – it’s the tagging company. Andy’s signal has been immobile for over an hour – they think Andy has removed the tag and done a runner. Ray goes upstairs, finding that Andy has hung himself. A note reads “Sorry dad”.

Darren is at Feltham. His barrister arrives telling him of Andy’s death. He’s in deep shock but withdrawn, hard to read. It seems obvious what will happen next, Darren will pin it on the dead boy. After all Andy isn’t around to argue. Darren’s barrister leads him through his defence, how Andy knew the girl, how Andy picked her up to show off, how he took her to the pit despite Darren’s concerns.

Ray can barely contain his anger. He shouts that Darren’s a liar, that Andy was a good boy, that Darren killed the girl and is now responsible for his son’s death. Darren’s eyes on Ray. He asks him if he really wants to know the truth? Who’s really responsible for his son’s death? And it starts to spill out. Darren’s barrister tries to interrupt, to get him back on course, but Darren tells him to shut up. His story is quiet and intense. They didn’t tell the truth because Andy was terrified of anyone finding out the truth about him. They didn’t go to the pit that night to have sex with Maria. They went there to have sex with each other. The court is in shock. The jury find Darren not guilty, though Walker tells Connor to keep on it, be a stubborn copper, go back again and again. She decides to go and talk to Darren.

At the flat, the front door ajar. A baby crying. The door swings open. Connor sees Ray Harper, sitting on the floor. He faces Darren who holds a gun, knowing that Ray would be coming to kill him after the trial. Connor tries to calm Darren. She’s just came to talk to him. He should put down the gun. But he continues, he needs to talk, to tell someone. They weren’t planning to hurt Maria. They were trying to help her.

They picked her up at the petrol station, when they stopped for vodka and coke. Darren persuaded Andy to help her out, give her a lift. Once in the car, she recognised Andy, and how he wasn’t exactly turned on by her performance back at the club. She picks up Andy’s camera, flicking through the photos – photos of Darren and Andy, together. The penny drops for Maria, and begins to mock and tease the boys. The son of big tough-guy Ray Harper is gay. Terrified of who she might tell, trying to shut her up, Andy pulls off the road and into the chalk pit. Maria jumps out of the car, stumbling out across the mud, in the driving rain. Darren tries to calm her down, but she’s having none of it.

Satch and Palmer pull up outside the flat, running upstairs. Inside, Darren continues to tell Ray and Connor the story, Ray now has the gun, the tension in the tiny flat increasing. At the pit, Maria continues to scream at the top of her lungs about Andy Harper being gay. In a desperate attempt to stop her, Andy raises the vodka bottle, and smashes it across Maria’s head. She falls to the ground, howling in agony, and crawls away into the dark, rainy night. Darren runs off, while Andy waits for his father to pull out his now stuck car.

Inside the flat, Ray drops the gun, pushes past Connor out into the daylight. Darren sobs in Connor’s arms.

Ronnie Reid is brought to London for questioning, accompanied by a mocking and nonchalant DI Mullins. During interview, Ronnie’s stutter makes it a slow and frustrating process for DCS Walker and DI Lynch. Ronnie admits he was fond of Margaret, but that he was in not in Glasgow at the time of her disappearance. He totally refutes the entries in Anna’s journal, and can produce witnesses to prove that he could not have been in London on the dates stated. His claims are backed up by Anna’s mother, Eileen Banks, who doesn’t believe that Anna wrote sections of the diary, there are many inconsistencies. Her suspicions are confirmed when the files are examined by the Met’s IT experts – entries were made after Anna was reported missing. With Ronnie’s alibi appearing to back up his claim that he couldn’t have been in London on the dates specified, it looks like somebody is trying to frame him and Kevin is brought in for questioning.

Walker is called back up to Glasgow – his mother’s condition has deteriorated further. He pays what feels like a final visit, an emotional moment where mother and son waltz slowly around the hospital room. While in Glasgow, Walker meets Mullins at Ronnie’s garage, where he finds petrol receipts proving he was in London when the diary suggests. Detailed checks of CCTV brings up Ronnie’s car near Kevin and Anna’s house on the day of her disappearance.

Ronnie confronts Kevin, an argument and struggle ensues. A frightened Jenny tells the police, and Walker arrives to find a sedated Ronnie locked in a deep freeze, and Kevin nowhere to be found. As soon as he recovers consciousness he makes his escape from hospital, calls Kevin and demands to meet him at the stock car racetrack.

In flashback we learn the truth of what happened. Kevin and Margaret in a furious row, her dog snarling and barking at him. As the dog makes a leap at Kevin, Margaret is knocked to the ground and falls unconscious. Seeing this as an opportunity to end his old life and start a new one, Kevin injects Margaret with a sedative, freezes her body in a deep freeze, before dismembering her and entombing her in the box. Eight years later, Ronnie visits his brother in London, where he sees for the first time Kevin’s new wife Anna. She appears at the door wearing the same dress that Margaret was last seen alive wearing. As Ronnie remembers the vision of Margaret, who he adored and doted on, the red mist descends. He forces his way into the house and attacks her. She falls and breaks her neck, dying instantly. Ronnie conceals her body underneath the stands at the race-track.

Walker, Satch and Lynch arrive at the track, but it’s too late. In his desire to end the psychological torment of what they have both done, Ronnie drives his car straight at Kevin, killing him instantly, before killing himself by deliberately crashing the car. It’s over, except for DI Moyra Lynch – she’s going back to where she started, to tell Eileen Banks that she has finally found her daughter.

Thursday 13 March 2008 9:00pm – 10:00pm on ITV1.

Dark night. Torrential rain. The glaring headlights of a car recovery vehicle moving through a sodden, marsh-like building site. It stops, illuminating two faces in front of their stranded vehicles. One fed up and furious man, Ray Harper, and his teenage son Andy, visibly frightened. Once freed, the two vehicles disappear fast. And now the recovery driver finds his own vehicle stuck. As the wheels spin and the vehicle finally jolts free we see what he hasn’t – the semi-naked body of a young woman.

Morning. Connor is driving towards the grim discovery. In the clay are three sets of tyre tracks. Some sort of gathering? A party? The site is popular with doggers and druggies. Casts of the tracks are made. A girl fitting the victim’s description has just been reported missing – Maria Cole. She and her friend Becky were at a bar in Archway. CCTV outside the Archway bar shows Maria getting on a bus. The interior bus CCTV: Maria half-asleep on the upper deck. And we see why she got off. Some hoodies grab her bag as the bus pulls into a stop. Maria runs downstairs after them. Bus stop CCTV shows her chasing them, disappearing alone into the darkness, running towards her death.

The recovery driver leads Connor to Ray Harper, and an address in a wealthy part of Essex. A freshly washed Lexus SUV in the driveway. Ray Harper is a bullish self-made man, who can’t help boasting about his son – smart, popular, football team captain Andy who has a place at Oxford. Ray confirms the truck driver’s story, says Andy called him from the pit and he went to try and help. 17-year-old Andy seems confident, unshakeable, almost cocky, a slicker version of his dad. When asked why he was at the pit, he replies that he belongs to a mentoring scheme – every Wednesday night he coaches a younger kid from a failing school, Darren Lewis. They spent the whole evening at his flat – Darren is tagged for a shoplifting offence and on a curfew. When he left Darren’s flat, Andy took a short cut via the pit, and got stuck. Ray and Andy claim they know nothing about Maria. They didn’t see or hear anything suspicious at the pit – there was so much rain and noise.

Maria made a 999 call reporting her bag stolen, from a petrol station half a mile from the bus stop. CCTV of the petrol station: Maria making her 999 call. And beyond, a car on the forecourt. Andy Harper’s Astra. Then Connor notices something. There is someone sitting in the passenger seat – Darren. Andy has been lying. Walker goes to find Andy at school. Andy is still cool, confident. He knows it was wrong but claims he only took Darren out because he felt bad for him, all cooped up in the tiny flat with a crying baby and a sister who doesn’t care. Connor visits Darren’s flat at the estate. His story matches Andy’s. Verbatim.

After speaking to Andy’s ex-girlfriend, it transpires that Ray took his son to a lap-dancing club for his birthday. Moreover, Ray paid for a private dance for his son. The dancer? Maria Cole. But it didn’t go exactly as planned. A lap-dance wasn’t exactly Andy’s cup of tea. So they knew her. Connor surmises that when they saw her at the garage, the boys offered Maria a lift, took her to the chalk pit, tried to have sex with her, and killed her to cover up their humiliation and guilt. Under questioning both boys stick to their claim that they didn’t see Maria. Walker and Connor can’t get a hair’s breadth between their stories. Walker and Connor question each boy in isolation. Anything to get them to crack, to slip up and contradict.

Satch and Palmer wading through a mountain of debris found in the chalk pit. Finally, they come across a broken vodka bottle with Andy’s prints and Maria’s DNA. Andy and Darren are charged with the murder of Maria Cole.

Thursday 20 March 2008 9:00pm – 10:00pm on ITV1

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