Zoo Days

The documentary strand profiling life at one of Britain’s busiest zoos concludes this week. Konnie Huq presents the series from Colchester Zoo, where 2,500 animals live under the care of a dedicated team of keepers.

Colchester Zoo boasts 270 different species and plays host to more than half a million visitors every year. The zoo’s team is involved in pioneering research and is at the forefront of some exciting conservation projects, working to ensure the survival of some of the rarest animals on the planet.

Supported by zoo and wildlife vet John Lewis, curators Clive Barwick and Sarah Forsyth head up a team of 60 keepers – all experts in their field with a passion for animal welfare to match.

This week’s programmes begin in dramatic fashion on Monday, as the keepers attempt to catch a poorly penguin who seems determined not to receive medical attention. Elsewhere, zoo curator Sarah has the job of feeding hand-reared cheetah cub Katavi, and a new arrival at the reindeer enclosure gives everyone a work-out.

In Tuesday’s show, there is an emergency when Piora the tamarin escapes. On the other side of the zoo, the keepers must step in to save a sick crowned crane chick, and there is an unusual naming ceremony for a cute new arrival.

When the team is tasked with moving some squirrel monkeys into a new enclosure on Wednesday, a shocking attack leads to a dash for the animal hospital. At the giraffe enclosure, meanwhile, new arrival Century gets measured. Over at the elephant house, mini cameras provide a keeper’s-eye view inside a four-tonne elephant’s mouth.

On Thursday, Zola the African elephant rejoins the females after eight months away. At the orang- utan house, the team prepares for a life-or-death procedure. Elsewhere, an upsetting discovery leaves big questions over Katavi’s future.

The series finale on Friday sees the vets anaesthetise Rajang the orang-utan for his move to a new home. Despite months of preparation, the keepers are not sure if he will survive the ordeal. Meanwhile, there is some exciting news at the aardvark house, and Katavi undergoes a series of tests to decide her fate.

The documentary strand profiling life at one of Britain’s busiest zoos continues. Konnie Huq presents the series from Colchester Zoo, where 2,500 animals live under the care of a dedicated team of keepers.

Colchester Zoo boasts 270 different species and plays host to more than half a million visitors every year. The zoo’s team is involved in pioneering research and is at the forefront of some exciting conservation projects, working to ensure the survival of some of the rarest animals on the planet.

Supported by zoo and wildlife vet John Lewis, curators Clive Barwick and Sarah Forsyth head up a team of 60 keepers – all experts in their field with a passion for animal welfare to match.

When a giant African spurred tortoise develops a leg problem on Monday, the team is left with no option but to operate. Elsewhere, Katavi the hand- reared cheetah cub accompanies zoo director Anthony to work, and the elephants are treated to a jumbo ice lolly!

In Tuesday’s show, the keepers face an emergency when a rare cat has a seizure; it is training day for some snappy crocodiles; and Colchester’s cheetahs get to play with a highly unusual ball of wool.

On Wednesday, an army of keepers is required to vaccinate an entire section of the zoo, but it will not be an easy task – weighing in at 12 stone, Merlin the Rocky Mountain goat will do all he can to avoid the needle. Elsewhere, night cameras are installed to capture fascinating footage of one of Colchester’s most elusive characters.

It is a busy day at the sea lion pool on Thursday as the team prepares for a new display for the summer season. There is only one problem – the sea lions seem determined to sabotage the rehearsals! Meanwhile, Katavi is given her inoculations, and troop leader Dume is put through his paces at the mandrill enclosure.

Friday’s instalment sees the keepers gather at Colchester’s aardvark burrow for a new arrival. At the mandrill enclosure, the veterinary team is called in when Dume develops a bad tooth. Elsewhere, the keepers shoot intimate footage of some baby crowned crane chicks moments after they hatch.

The documentary strand profiling life at one of Britain’s busiest zoos continues. Konnie Huq presents the series from Colchester Zoo, where 2,500 animals live under the care of a dedicated team of keepers. Colchester Zoo boasts 270 different species and plays host to more than half a million visitors every year. The zoo’s team is involved in pioneering research and is at the forefront of some exciting conservation projects, working to ensure the survival of some of the rarest animals on the planet. Supported by zoo and wildlife vet John Lewis, curators Clive Barwick and Sarah Forsyth head up a team of 60 keepers – all experts in their field with a passion for animal welfare to match.

On Monday, the meerkats start their week with a hearty breakfast of boiled eggs. The keepers join Babyface the harbour seal in his pool when an underwater filter becomes blocked. And senior keeper Kelly gets a surprise when she discovers that Tallulah the timber wolf has given birth to six cubs.

In Tuesday’s instalment, Konnie catches up with Katavi the hand-reared cheetah cub as he takes his first steps outdoors. Elsewhere, new arrival Century the giraffe faces his biggest challenge yet when he comes face to face with Colchester’s rhinos.

Wednesday’s programme sees senior keeper Richard attempt an unusual experiment involving a melon, a tea bag and eight million ants. Meanwhile, Century is unveiled to the waiting public and Milly the mandrill introduces keepers to her new baby.

It is crunch time in the rhino house on Thursday. After months of hard work, the team finally discovers whether white rhino Cynthia is pregnant. If she is, Colchester Zoo could soon be celebrating the arrival of the first rhino ever born through artificial insemination in the UK.

Friday’s instalment finds the keepers enjoying a late Christmas celebration as Chaos the reindeer arrives. Chaos has never been handled before so could prove quite a challenge. Elsewhere, rare Amur tigers Igor and Anoushka take on the keepers in a tug of war; and Katavi the hand-reared cheetah comes face to face with zoo director Anthony’s dogs.

The documentary strand profiling life at one of Britain’s busiest zoos returns. Konnie Huq presents the series from Colchester Zoo, where 2,500 animals live under the care of a dedicated team of keepers.

Colchester Zoo boasts 270 different species and plays host to more than half a million visitors every year. The zoo’s team is involved in pioneering research and is at the forefront of some exciting conservation projects, working to ensure the survival of some of the rarest animals on the planet. Supported by zoo and wildlife vet John Lewis, curators Clive Barwick and Sarah Forsyth head up a team of 60 keepers – all experts in their field with a passion for animal welfare to match.

In the first episode of the new run on Monday, zoo director Anthony Tropeano steps in to save a newborn cheetah cub abandoned by its mother. The cub requires round-the-clock care and Anthony knows he is in for some sleepless nights. Elsewhere, the marine mammal keepers get a sea lion’s-eye view of Colchester Zoo when they don their scuba gear for a spot of underwater window cleaning.

In Tuesday’s instalment, Anthony has concerns for the newborn cheetah cub he is hand rearing. Vet John Lewis gives some expert medical advice before attending to Jasmine, a harbour seal with an infected eye. The zoo’s elephants have a game of football and the team prepares for the arrival of a baby giraffe from Longleat.

There is sadness on Wednesday when rare African hunting dog Depti leaves Colchester to begin a new life overseas. Meanwhile, the keepers are nervous when they have to get to grips with a giant anteater. Zookeepers have been killed by these incredibly powerful creatures in the past, so the mood is understandably tense. Will the procedure go smoothly?

Thursday’s programme catches up with mangabey monkey Sputnik, who is rapidly earning a reputation for his bully boy antics. After ousting a mob of mongooses from his enclosure earlier in the year, he turns his attention to his own troop – leaving the keepers to pick up the pieces. Elsewhere, the team’s attempts to listen to a rare leopard’s heartbeat are foiled by an unexpected problem.

Friday’s instalment features drama at the white rhino house. The keepers are hoping that female white rhino Cynthia will be the first in the UK to have a baby born through artificial insemination. Male rhino Simba has to be anaesthetised to play his part in the process, but when he fails to come round, the team is forced to spring into action.

Sunday 7th December at 12:00 and 12:30pm
Monday 8th December at 6:30pm
Tuesday 9th December at 6:30pm

The documentary series following daily life at Britain’s biggest zoo concludes this week.

Chester Zoo is home to 7,000 animals from 400 species and is visited by more than a million people each year. The zoo has some of the most experienced keepers in the business, working alongside a dedicated veterinary team with a fully equipped animal hospital on-site.

With so many animals in residence, a new baby is born at the zoo nearly every day. Keepers and their young charges often develop close bonds, as is the case with Rafters, a giraffe who has been hand-reared since birth. It is all in a day’s work for the vets and nurses based at the zoo’s Animal Health Centre –who sometimes admit to knowing more about the animals in their care than members of their own family. The series is narrated by actress Sarah Lancashire.

It is a stressful day for the keepers and vets at Chester Zoo on Monday. Samara, a 14ft-tall giraffe, must be anaesthetised for an operation. Getting her to the floor and back on her feet again safely calls for a massive team effort and great expertise. Will the procedure go smoothly?

In the final episode of the series on Tuesday , head keeper Alan gets news about Tejas, the lion cub he reared by hand. Samara the giraffe is loaded into a trailer for the journey to her new home. And the rhino team prepares for the birth of Kitani’s baby.

The documentary series following daily life at Britain’s biggest zoo continues. Chester Zoo is home to 7,000 animals from 400 species and is visited by more than a million people each year.

The zoo has some of the most experienced keepers in the business, working alongside a dedicated veterinary team with a fully equipped animal hospital on-site.

With so many animals in residence, a new baby is born at the zoo nearly every day. Keepers and their young charges often develop close bonds, as is the case with Rafters, a giraffe who has been hand-reared since birth. It is all in a day’s work for the vets and nurses based at the zoo’s Animal Health Centre –who sometimes admit to knowing more about the animals in their care than members of their own family. The series is narrated by actress Sarah Lancashire.

On Monday, unseasonable weather creates problems in the flamingo enclosure over May Bank Holiday weekend. Elsewhere, senior keeper Belinda Porter devises a cunning plan to get Strolch the bear to take his medicine. And Norman the Komodo dragon goes on a dinner date with his new lady friend.

In Tuesday’s instalment, an orthopaedic surgeon tends to Isobel the deer’s broken leg. The weather continues to wreak havoc at flamingo HQ. And now that Kitani the black rhino is with child, her usual routine needs a shake-up.

On Wednesday, the moment of truth has arrived for Strolch. Has pioneering eye surgery restored his vision? And there is good news regarding Sheba the elderly elephant.

On Thursday, baby giraffe Margaret returns to the herd after an illness. Meanwhile, a rare macaw departs for a new life abroad. And keepers struggle to catch a colony of bats.

And on Friday, a hot-headed crocodile shows his displeasure when he is transferred to a new compound. The cheetahs get a newfangled toy. And the jaguars tuck into an ice lolly feast.

The documentary series following daily life at Britain’s biggest zoo continues. Chester Zoo is home to 7,000 animals from 400 species and is visited by more than a million people each year.

The zoo has some of the most experienced keepers in the business, working alongside a full-time veterinary team with a fully equipped animal hospital on-site.

With so many animals in residence, it comes as no surprise that a new baby is born at the zoo nearly every day. Keepers and their young charges often develop close bonds, as is the case with Rafters, a giraffe who has been hand-reared since birth. It is all in a day’s work for the vets and nurses based at the zoo’s Animal Health Centre –who sometimes admit to knowing more about the animals in their care than members of their own family. The series is narrated by actress Sarah Lancashire.

On Monday , the zoo’s eye surgeon prepares for a pioneering operation on Strolch the bespectacled bear. The stakes are high because without the risky surgery, Strolch could lose his sight. Meanwhile, baby giraffe Margaret confounds her keepers.

In Tuesday’s instalment, Strolch goes under the knife. Jaguar couple Salvador and Sofia are reunited after some time apart. Elsewhere, a spider monkey arrives from France to work his Gallic charm on the girls.

And on Wednesday , there is exciting news when Kitani the black rhino is found to be pregnant. Meanwhile, head keeper Mike Crumpler has to be careful when dealing with three baby stingrays. And some cheeky chimpanzees give a display of bad manners when squabbling over a treat.

The documentary series following daily life at Britain’s biggest zoo continues this week.
Chester Zoo is home to 7,000 animals from 400 species and is visited by more than a million people each year. The zoo has some of the most experienced keepers in the business, working alongside a full-time veterinary team with a fully equipped animal hospital on-site.

With so many animals in residence, it comes as no surprise that a new baby is born at the zoo nearly every day. Keepers and their young charges often develop close bonds, as is the case with Rafters, a giraffe who has been hand-reared since birth. It is all in a day’s work for the vets and nurses based at the zoo’s Animal Health Centre –who sometimes admit to knowing more about the animals in their care than members of their own family. The series is narrated by actress Sarah Lancashire.

On Monday, vet James Chatterton must operate on one of the zoo’s big cats. But with this ferocious feline, it is not going to be a straightforward task. Elsewhere, Chester’s baby penguins have outgrown their nesting boxes.

In Tuesday’s instalment, a giant bat has a flying accident and is given the once-over by James to make sure no serious damage has been done. Meanwhile, black rhinos Ema and Magardi continue their clumsy courtship.

Wednesday is a big day, as two new cheetahs arrive at the zoo. Also in this edition, a rare barbirusa piglet wins another admirer.

On Thursday, the keepers are thrilled to see an old face back at the zoo. Sibu the orang-utan has been away for several years doing the rounds of other wildlife parks. This happy reunion is tainted with sadness, however, as Margaret the baby giraffe falls ill.

In Friday’s episode, vet Steve Unwin is operating on Mac the zebra –but first he has to administer anaesthetic. And the cheetahs explore their new home, much to the amusement of both keepers and visitors.

This week sees the return of the documentary series following daily life at Britain’s biggest zoo. Chester Zoo is home to 7,000 animals from 400 species and is visited by more than a million people each year. The zoo has some of the most experienced keepers in the business, working alongside a full-time veterinary team with a fully equipped animal hospital on site.

With so many animals in residence, it comes as no surprise that a new baby is born at the zoo nearly every day. Keepers and their young charges often develop close bonds, as is the case with Rafters, a giraffe who has been hand-reared since birth. It is all in a day’s work for the vets and nurses based at the zoo’s Animal Health Centre –who sometimes admit to knowing more about the animals in their care than members of their own family. The series is narrated by actress Sarah Lancashire.

On Monday, Strolch the South American bear pays a visit to eye surgeon Guy Clare. Can anything be done to save his eyesight? Elsewhere, six newborn lemurs settle into their new home.

In Tuesday’s instalment, baby giraffe Margaret woos the crowd at Chester Zoo as she goes on a family outing. And the renovation of one of the enclosures looks set to be thwarted by some cheeky orang-utans.

Wednesday sees Sheba, the matriarch of Chester Zoo’s elephant family, being kept awake by the younger members of her herd. Can keeper Mick Jones solve her problem?

Love could be in the air on Thursday, as a pair of Indian rhinoceroses meet for the first time. And vets Steve Unwin and James Chatterton give Junior the mandrill a check-up before he moves to his new home in Russia.

In Friday’s episode, head vet Stephanie Sanderson is attacked by a legion of escaped South American leafcutter ants. Also, keeper Niall Ormerod whips up a breakfast treat for 30 hungry chimpanzees.

The documentary strand profiling life at one of Britain’s busiest zoos concludes this week. This time around, Zoo Days is presented by Konnie Huq and comes from Colchester Zoo in Essex.

Every day, Konnie takes viewers behind the scenes at the zoo, providing privileged access to over 2,500 animals and the dedicated team of 60 keepers that looks after them.

Occupying an area of 60 acres in the Essex countryside, Colchester Zoo attracts more than half a million visitors every year, but is run as a family business – a concept that gives the zoo a unique, friendly atmosphere. The staff at the zoo are full of character and passionate about their work.

For the 60 curators, keepers and vets at Colchester, working at the zoo could never be described as routine. Caring for elephants, tigers, lions, rhinos, chimps and giraffes, no two jobs are ever the same. On one day, staff might be required to encourage endangered species to breed, while the next might see them having to support their animals through dangerous medical operations.

Throughout the series, viewers have met such characters as Zola, the African elephant who is carrying the hopes of the whole zoo on her shoulders; a desperately fragile baby aardvark; and Jez, the zoo’s innovative new animal trainer.

In Monday’s show, baby elephant Jambo arrives at his new home – a state-of-the-art zoo in Spain. Back in Colchester, Veri the binturong finds her peace and quiet disturbed by the arrival of a new male partner; and new keeper Hayley’s first big day in charge of the sea lions is getting closer, but will she be ready in time?

In Tuesday’s programme, there are serious doubts about the future of the tiger cubs, presenting zoo director Anthony with some tough decisions. Elsewhere, new keeper Adam faces his first major challenge when Ed the giraffe urgently needs medicine; and spring brings some welcome new arrivals to the zoo.

The alarm is raised at the tiger house on Wednesday, after developments with pregnant mum-to-be Anoushka. And a two-tonne tearaway rhino gives the whole team the run-around.

In Thursday’s instalment, it is crunch time at the tiger house as Sarah discovers the fate of the cubs; keeper Richard provides an ants-eye view of the world; and Malaika the baboon gets lippy.

In the last episode of the series on Friday, zoo director Anthony looks to the future for Zola, the African elephant with the troubled past; it is Hayley’s first public display in charge of the sea lions; and Jez’s training with Rajang moves on to a whole new level.

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